Tag Archive: law student

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Law School Admissions Trend to Watch For: Lower Tuition

It was only a matter of time before a law school did it, and Arizona decided to be the trailblazer.

After years of falling application numbers, a law school finally cut its tuition.

Many law schools have frozen increases, and other have upped their scholarship offers, but no one has taken the step of lowering tuition — all in the face of far-above-inflation tuition raises over the past decade coupled with a decline in law school applicants.

At the University of Arizona, tuition will drop 11% in-state and 8% non-residents, bringing the tuition to $24,381 and $38,841, respectively. Completely reasonable.

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5 Things Prospective Law Students Don’t Do, But Should

Today’s guest LSAT blog post is by Shawdi Vara, a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who is currently attending UC-Davis Law School.

Here are the top five things I learned about applying to law school. Specifically, here are five things prospective law students don’t do, but absolutely should (there is some overlap between each, but that’s to be expected):

#1 Thing Prospective Law Students Don’t Do, But Should: Spend more time thinking about the law schools you would actually go to
So many of us just blanket apply. Don’t do that. Really think about what type of law you wanna do.

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What Spring Break Means for Students in Law School

If you’re a (somewhat) newly minted law student, you’ve no doubt been looking eagerly ahead to Spring Break as a time to catch a much-needed breather.

Good luck with that.

While you won’t be burdened with as much reading and the necessity of visiting a classroom on a daily basis, law school will still follow you around — even on Spring Break.

At some law schools (my alma mater included), Spring Break is when you’ll be auditioning (read: doing research and a ton of writing) for law review. If you’re particularly ambitious, this is a path you may want to consider. I didn’t do it myself, but my colleagues assured me that both the write-on process and being on law review were entirely rewarding experiences.

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What Shrinking Class Sizes Mean For Law School Applicants

There are many ways law school admission deans are dealing with declining applicant numbers. Some find themselves weeping uncontrollably at MasterCard commercials. Others have turned to the bottle. And, finally, a few are deciding to decrease the number of admitted applicants.

The most recent of these is Loyola Chicago, following close behind Northwestern, it’s more prestigious neighbor. Both announced a 10% reduction in their incoming class sizes, citing the smaller law school applicant pool and the shifting legal market.

I, for one, applaud these law schools for taking the initiative. While I’m sure their motivations are less than magnanimous (after all, it’s a lot easier to maintain your medians when you’re admitting significantly fewer students), it is definitely a step in the right direction.

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The ABA Zeroes in on Law School Employment Data

I don’t know if you’ve heard, but law schools have been shamelessly inflating their employment statistics for years. Shocking, I know.

After cracking down on the way schools report their LSAT scores (a scandal or two helped push in that direction, *cough* Villanova and Illinois *cough*), the ABA has now turned its attention to law school employment data. In fact, the ABA is currently soliciting proposals, so feel free to throw your hat in the ring.

This is going to be a much more difficult program than the one designed to ensure correct LSAT info. For admissions data, the LSAC acts as a central repository for all law school application data. Anyone who has an LSAT score took the test through LSAC.

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Logical Reasonings / 12.11.12

A) An open letter to law school deans (especially the ones who hate the media). Above the Law.

B) Huh. Turns out appeals do sometimes work. CNN.

C) A law student was gunned down in Manhattan yesterday. Suspect still on the loose. ABA Journal.

D) After years of debate, Sesame Street is finally going to talk about divorce. Time.

E) Send all your old baseball cards to these guys. Stat. Baseball Card Vandals.

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Logical Reasonings / 11.2.12

A) If you’re going to be a first-generation law student, this law school might be for you. Law.com.

B) New York mayor Michael Bloomberg decides it’s probably best not to run a marathon in his hurricane-ravaged city. CBS News.

C) Here’s how New York law firms are dealing with the aftermath of Sandy. Wall Street Journal.

D) Anyone need some walnuts? This thief has 82,000 pounds of them. Yahoo! News.

E) If you’re voting in California on Tuesday, make sure you know about Prop 53. Team Coco.

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Logical Reasonings / 8.10.12

A) The dean at Saint Louis School of Law has resigned, accusing the university of raiding funds. National Law Journal.

B) Don’t forget: You can always use that law degree to run a girls’ rock and roll camp. Oregon Live.

C) This law student dropped out and applied to work for the San Diego Padres 30 times. When they repeatedly said no, she wrote them a nice little letter. Deadspin.

D) Better pay off those federal student loans if you want social security when you retire. Market Watch.

E) Have you had your dolphin fix today? io9.

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Logical Reasonings / 8.8.12

A) Hmm. Some law schools want to change their tuition figures for US News & World Report. Wall Street Journal.

B) This New York University law student has resorted to post signs to help pay off his law school debt. Village Voice.

C) Randy Travis almost has more mugshots than Grammys. CNN.

D) It was pretty hot in July, huh? Only the hottest month in US history. New York Times.

E) Famous album covers recreated with socks, please. The Sock Covers.

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Logical Reasonings / 7.11.12

A) Yale Law School unveils a PhD in law — the first of its kind. But will it solve the legal job market pickle? Wall Street Journal.

B) A Texas Tech law student was named Miss Texas 2012. Yee v. Haw! Above the Law.

C) Police in California are using new software that predicts when crimes will be committed. So if you’re going to rob a convenience store, best do it five minutes early. CNN.

D) If you have DirecTV but lost a couple channels last night, here’s why. Deadline.

E) I know I already posted something about sharks this week, but this one is much better. Trust me. BuzzFeed.