Tag Archive: logic games

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These Spooky Logic Games Are More Trick than Treat

Halloween Week continues here at Ghost Strongly Supported (speaking of which, have you entered our costume/pumpkin-carving contest yet??) with something truly spooky — we’ve got a super special set of Logic Games for you, hot and fresh out the proverbial kitchen.

We cooked up these games ourselves at Blueprint, using real LSAT logic games as an inspiration. If you’re truly stumped, we’ve provided some quick tips below to help you find deductions, but you should attempt the games on your own before checking out those hints.

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Reading Comp and Logic Games

Yesterday, we took a detailed look at the Logical Reasoning sections on the September 2017 LSAT. We found a set of sections that had a pretty typical distribution of question types, but that leaned heavily on conditionality. Overall, they were a set a pretty mild LR section. But what about the other two sections, Reading Comp and Logic Games? Everyone said the former was crazy difficult, and the latter crazy easy. We’ll dive into those, and this exam’s curve, below.

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Should I re-do Logic Games?

There is a surprisingly broad range of opinions when it comes to the question of re-doing Logic Games. I find that many students assume their time is better spent working on material they’ve never seen before, instead of repeating games they’ve already tried. Meanwhile, some LSAT tutors advocate re-doing games as many as 10 times to glean the maximum amount of knowledge from them. I’d argue that the truth, as is often the case, lies somewhere in the middle.

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

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A Grouping Game Overview

If you’re a student in one of Blueprint’s classes, you’ve probably wrapped up grouping games recently. What makes an In and Out game different from the rest? How are stable games different from unstable games? And what was a profiling game again? Let’s recap and talk about distinguishing the different types of grouping games from each other.

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Here we go, yo (again) … Scenarios for grouping games

When you can break an LSAT logic game down into a few possibilities up front, we call that making scenarios. When you do it right, it can make so many games so much easier, but you have to know when to use it. We covered hints that you might want to do scenarios in ordering games a couple weeks ago. Today, let’s talk about when scenarios are a good idea in grouping games.

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Here we go, yo—when should you make a scenario?

Scenarios are one of the most killer strategies for LSAT logic games. They don’t work for every game, but when you can split a game into two, three, or four possibilities upfront it’ll often make the questions just breeze by.

In general, look to do scenarios when there’s something in a game that can only go two to four ways and you think that trying those two to four possibilities would help you figure out other thinks in the game. Some kinds of rules lead to scenarios more often than others, so today we’ll cover rules in ordering games that often make scenarios a good idea. If you see one of the following things in a game, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you should do scenarios. But the thought should at least cross your mind.

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logic Games

Today we’re wrapping up our analysis of the June 2017 LSAT with an in-depth look at the Logic Games section. Unlike the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comp sections, early reports indicated was relatively gentle on battle-weary test-takers. Were those reports correct? Read on to find out!

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The Last Push: Logic Games

The Logic Games section is your most important section on the LSAT. This is because most of your improvement on the LSAT will come from the Logic Games section, which is by far the most learnable section of the test.

So with two weekends between you and the LSAT, let’s go over what you should concentrate on in your last push for Logic Games greatness.