Tag Archive: logic games

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Here we go, yo—when should you make a scenario?

Scenarios are one of the most killer strategies for LSAT logic games. They don’t work for every game, but when you can split a game into two, three, or four possibilities upfront it’ll often make the questions just breeze by.

In general, look to do scenarios when there’s something in a game that can only go two to four ways and you think that trying those two to four possibilities would help you figure out other thinks in the game. Some kinds of rules lead to scenarios more often than others, so today we’ll cover rules in ordering games that often make scenarios a good idea. If you see one of the following things in a game, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you should do scenarios. But the thought should at least cross your mind.

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logic Games

Today we’re wrapping up our analysis of the June 2017 LSAT with an in-depth look at the Logic Games section. Unlike the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comp sections, early reports indicated was relatively gentle on battle-weary test-takers. Were those reports correct? Read on to find out!

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The Last Push: Logic Games

The Logic Games section is your most important section on the LSAT. This is because most of your improvement on the LSAT will come from the Logic Games section, which is by far the most learnable section of the test.

So with two weekends between you and the LSAT, let’s go over what you should concentrate on in your last push for Logic Games greatness.

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Unlocking Logic Games with Organization

The more I work with LSAT students, the more I believe that the way you organize your work on the Logic Games affects your overall performance. I’ve seen a lot of students who are struggling to understand games or find deductions, and often when I look at their homework, it’s hard to even figure out what they’re doing because their work is all over the place and totally disorganized.

This is, of course, bad. Despite what you may think, the way that you organize your work for Logic Games makes a big difference on your performance, and the best practice is not to use up as much of the white space on the page as you can. Instead, your work should be kept to a limited, but well-organized, area. This is for two reasons: 1) speed, and 2) ease of finding deductions.

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Your Official One-Month LSAT Study Plan

As May rolls on and spring makes its entrance (very slowly, in the case of the Northeast), we are now officially one month from the June LSAT. If that sounds scary to you, it shouldn’t—a month is actually still quite a lot of time to prepare for the LSAT, and you can improve your score pretty significantly during that time. Here’s what to do to ensure you’re making the most of it.

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Early LSAT Check-In: What Is and Isn’t Important after the First Few Lessons

Blueprint classes for the June LSAT are underway—most students are a few lessons in at this point. If you’re studying for the June LSAT, let’s talk about what should and shouldn’t be important at this point.

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The Deal With That Trading Buildings Game

It’s rare in this world to find something that everyone can agree upon. In the hours after the December 2016 LSAT, however, we found something that fits the bill: the Logic Game about companies trading buildings was all kinds of f***ed up. Well, last week, as happens every year this time, the exam was released. And, of course, we got our grubby little hands on it immediately to take a gander at this oddity. To be sure, this game was weird.

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The Makers of the LSAT Are Playing (Logic) Games With Your Head

There have been some weird logic games lately. For a very long time, from the late 1990s until a few years ago, it seemed as if logic games had standardized. The vast majority of logic games asked you to put things in order, in groups, or both. The exact kind of ordering or grouping varied from test to test, but relatively standard games dominated.

Sure, there were hard games. Every test has one. Some games were weird. But back then, most of the weird games were recognizable as tricky variations of normal games, with many of the same kinds of rules.

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The December 2016 LSAT: Instant Recap

Good luck today! Check back here after the exam for information or to add what you know in the comments. We’ll be updating throughout the day.

An important note: LSAC prohibits us from publishing any big specifics from any LSAT (this includes individual questions/answers, trying to identify the experimental section, etc.). So if your comment is removed, it most likely violated some kind of rule or was close enough that we didn’t want to risk it. Here’s a pretty good guide for what’s acceptable.

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With Logic Games, a little time on the front-end pays off on the score report.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve found yourself scrambling to get an assignment done the night before it is due. Among those nights of panic and regret, you’ve probably also encountered the stomach churning realization that you’re not going to be able to complete your task on time. When I’ve been in those moments of desperate clarity, I’ve promised myself time and time again that I won’t procrastinate ever again–I’ll turn over a new leaf and stay ahead of my work. And yet, I keep finding myself in the same situation over and over again.