Tag Archive: logic games

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Predictions for the November 2018 LSAT

The November LSAT fast approaches, and the time has come for us to brush off our crystal ball and peer into its murky depths in order to bring you some predictions about what you’ll see on the November 2018 LSAT.

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Get Some Practice Playing the Numbers

When someone tells you to “play the numbers” in a Logic Game, does your mind go blank, or even worse, to some kind of ill-conceived gambling scheme? If you’re not yet comfortable with playing the numbers, then you’re in luck (with your LSAT aspirations at least). Playing the numbers is mainly going to be a method deployed on overbooked and underbooked logic games. It’s a way to determine the parameters of the game (the smallest and largest numbers you can use while applying all of the game’s rules). This allows you to narrow down the game to a few possible scenarios. Let’s look at a couple examples to see how you would “play the numbers” in an actual game.

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A Look at the September 2018 LSAT: Logic Games

Today we’re continuing our look at the September 2018 LSAT by delving into the Logic Games section. There have been a few recent test administrations with some off-the-wall game types (like a vanishingly-rare circular game on the July administration of the test). Did LSAC continue the trend of unusual game types with this most recent test, or did they bring it back to basics? Read on to find out!

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What I Wish I Knew About Logic Games Before Taking the LSAT

There are some people who feel completely comfortable with LSAT logic games — they take to games like a fish to water, with nary a problem finding deductions or visualizing how the game works.

Back when I was studying for the LSAT, I was not one of those people. Don’t get me wrong, I did fine on the Games section, but I always had a lingering fear that I’d get some super hard game on my test and not be able to figure it out. I just couldn’t quite see how games worked in the way that other people could.

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When You Need to Triage Your LSAT Studies

In a hospital, triage is about assigning degrees of urgency to different patients when there are too many to treat right away. But what does triage look like in the context of the LSAT?

Many LSAT students get to a point when they realize that they just won’t have time to master every possible topic the LSAT could throw at them. Instead of giving each topic equal time, the best thing this student can do is to assign highest priority to those LSAT topics which are most common and most important to success.

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Gather ‘Round to Learn How to Conquer Circular Games

Circular logic games are a veritable unicorn of the LSAT, but the kind of unicorn you’d really rather not see, like one that poops ominous clouds instead of rainbows.

Takers of the July 2018 LSAT were unpleasantly surprised to find that their test included one of these mythical game types.

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Don’t Miss Out on Our Two LSAT Webinars Tomorrow!

Before we could harness the power of the internet to bring LSAT content directly to you, the industrious future attorney, some of the older LSAT knowers at Blueprint had to pile into a used Ford Econoline and hit the road, trekking all across this nation, dropping kernels of LSAT knowledge wherever we could. Like some weird, legal-themed Johnny Appleseeds. By the time we would reach the east coast, the van’s brakes would be shot, along with our patience for each other and our tolerance for a diet of gas station gastronomy.

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RSVP to Next Tuesday’s LSAT and Logic Games Webinars!

Back to school season is in full swing, and next week, Blueprint is taking you to class. That’s right — we’re hosting two free webinars, so you’ll be able to learn more about the LSAT as a whole or the Logic Games section specifically, from the comfort of your own home! Or the library… or work… or your friendly neighborhood coffee shop… you get the idea. Pants are optional (unless you’re in one of the latter places).

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Logic Games and the Curve

And we’re finishing up our fantastic voyage through the June 2018 LSAT today with Logic Games and “the curve.” In many ways, these are the easiest parts of the LSAT to predict. And yet, in my experience, these are the two sections students freak out about the most. The chance of getting a completely novel game tends to worry a lot of test takers. And yet, pretty much every games section features one basic ordering game, one tiered ordering game, a grouping game of some sort, and then either a second grouping game or a game that combines ordering and grouping. People worry about whether they’re going to get a hard test or an easy test, and then if it’s an easy test, they worry that the curve will be totally unforgiving. But, not for nothing, our resident LSAT soothsayer has been nailing the curve for awhile now.

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Finally, Our Infallible Expert* Makes His Unimpeachable Predictions for the June LSAT

The June LSAT is coming up Monday, so it’s time for our favorite every-few-months ritual: predicting what will be on the LSAT. The usual disclaimer applies — we don’t have any insider knowledge about what’s going to be on Monday’s test. Even if we did, we’d remain silent lest a team of LSAC secret agents show up at our offices with a thirst for vengeance. So, uh, anyway, what follows is a guess. Nothing more, nothing less.