Tag Archive: logic games

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The LSAT 6-Month Study Plan

Now that it’s April, the June LSAT is fast approaching. The next test after that in September seems pretty far off. Some students may want to start preparing early, though. Trying to cram all of the material on the LSAT into a few weeks of studying can be very overwhelming. Some prefer to space the process out. For those folks, here is a template to help guide your studying over a six month period.

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Logical Reasonings / 3.29.16

A. There’s still time to enter to win a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Reading Comprehension! Blueprint LSAT Preparation

B. Visual learner or not, you will understand time-honored mysteries like how a sewing machine works or what the heck pi is by watching these GIFs. Relatively Interesting

C. Here’s a Logic Game for kiddies from waaaay back in the day. Can you solve it? If not, do you really think you ought to be a lawyer? The Telegraph

D. In yet another story of a law school struggling financially, Valparaiso has offered buyouts to a number of faculty members. Onlooking vultures were quoted as saying, “Dinner time!” South Bend Tribune

E. Two words: Florida. Man. TC Palm

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4 Short Stories that Are Logic Games at Heart

Last time I blogged, I gave suggestions of podcasts that would give you some general subject familiarity that might help you on reading comp. Today’s suggestions are for short fiction that will help you with logic games. If that sounds pretty unlikely, that’s because it is.

These suggestions are quite tenuously related to actual studying, but if you’re casting about for a great read, you could do worse than these short stories, chosen for a logical complexity that mimics that of the games (and for their general coolness).

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An Introduction to the LSAT

If you’re perusing this blog, there’s a good chance you’re considering law school. Or maybe your heart has been set on law school since you took your first step. Or maybe you’re just doing some research for a friend or relative who may go to law school.

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The Logic of Skipping a Game

As the song goes, “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em and know when to fold ’em.” In a perfect world, you’d be able to finish all four Logic Games in a section within the given time, but sometimes that’s just not in the cards.

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The Rules for Logic Games Rules

There are just ten days left until the February LSAT, and at this point your methods for tackling Logic Games are pretty much settled. However, there’s still time to improve your speed on this all-important section.

As you know, one of the first steps when starting a Logic Game is to visually represent each rule so that you don’t have to keep re-reading the text.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

When you finish a 3.5 hour-long practice test, the last thing you want to do after scoring it is to go over the questions you got wrong. But reviewing practice tests is ridiculously important. It’s as valuable as taking the practice tests in the first place, if you go about it strategically.

First of all, don’t review your test right after you score it. You’re tired and frustrated – at least in my personal experience. I recommend reviewing each test the next day.

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The Day After the Day After

You shut your friends and family out of your life. You gave up that thing that was way too distracting. (Yes, we know about that thing. Blueprint is the Santa Claus of test preparation.) You studied and studied and studied. You pleaded with fate or whatever higher power you believe in. Maybe you even pleaded with a higher power you don’t believe in. In short, you turned your happy life upside down over a multiple-choice test. That test happened this past Saturday.

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A Pre-LSAT Pep Talk

You’ve waited for it. You’ve dreamt about it. You’ve lost friends incessantly talking about it and you don’t mind.

And here it is.

With the LSAT just hours away, students often wonder how to spend that last anxious day. Cram? Wind down? I’ve heard recommendations from all across the spectrum, and I think there’s some merit to each, but here I’ll divulge my tried-and-true personal strategy.