Tag Archive: logic

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If it’s important, then you should review it.

Studying for the February exam? If you’re in one of Blueprint’s classroom courses, you’ve made it through the first four lessons and the first workshop. If you’re in the online course – or another course or self-studying for that matter – you should be around the same place in your learning as well: you’ve made it through the foundational material that will underpin and inform the rest of your studies.

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Logical Fallacies and the NBA Playoffs

We’re getting deep into the NBA playoffs. You may be tempted to avoid studying for the LSAT by watching these games, but with just about a month before the June exam, there isn’t a moment to waste. Fortunately, you can multitask and get some much-needed review of the common fallacies by paying close attention to the commentators in this series. Sports commentators fall victim to a lot of logical fallacies. This is especially true for TNT color man Reggie Miller. Here are some examples from the first-round Spurs-Clippers series …

In this series, the Spurs coach Gregg Popovich frequently employed the controversial Hack-a-Jordan strategy. This involves Pop sending one of his bench-riding scrubs out to deliberately foul star Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, and send him to the free throw line for two unobstructed shots. Why do this?

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Law Student Perspective: Deflategate

Hey there, sports fans! Today’s post is dedicated to a topic that has dominated headlines and social media for the last week—Deflategate. You’ll get perspective from one law student (me) on fallacies and misinterpretations from the media, as well as the potential ramifications for the Patriots organization.

Before we go any further, there’s one pet peeve I feel compelled to address: this habit of adding “gate” to the end of any word associated with a scandal really needs to stop. Not only does it not make sense (Watergate was the actual name of the hotel where the Nixon scandal began—it wasn’t Watergate-gate), but it is also an unoriginal way for the media to sensationalize an issue without putting in any effort.

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LSAT Logic Flaws on the Big Screen

We’re pretty close to the September LSAT, and I bet you’re pretty sick of thinking about it. Me too.

So rather than tackling a specific element of the test, or how you should be studying, or even talking law school applications, I want to turn your attention to one of society’s safe havens for logic flaws and faulty arguments: Hollywood.

Let’s take a look at the logical fallacies in three of the most famous lines in movie history.

1. “You want the truth? You can’t handle the truth!” – A Few Good Men

This oft-quoted Sorkinism is one of the most well-known movie quotes ever, in part because it’s delivered by one of Hollywood’s greatest stars.

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LSAT Logic Flaws: Correlation vs. Causation

Ever had this experience? Your gooberish buddy stumbles up to you, a couple drinks too deep, and spouts out an epiphany that (to him) rivals Einstein’s Annus Mirabilis. You and your LSAT-prepped mind, however, are not impressed. Something about the logic doesn’t sit right. It gives you an uneasy feeling deep in your gut — a sensation exacerbated by the PBR and stale pretzels sloshing around down there.

Let’s take an example. Say your friend — let’s call him Elliot — adamantly insists that when he stood up, Sexy Sadie looked over. He’s convinced that his standing caused her eyes to linger longingly on his portly physique and freshly-starched robin’s egg Polo.

You tell him, in accordance with your studies, that there are three methods by which we may seek to weaken a causal claim.