Tag Archive: logical reasoning

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A Requiem for the Must Be False Question

We all know the people who write the LSAT have very little chill, dedicating their life’s work to constructing what can sometimes feel like an obnoxiously difficult exam. But did you know they were actual MURDERERS?

OK, don’t take that literally. They’re not murders in any legal sense (as far as we know … ). Technically, they’re not even murders in the figurative sense I’m getting at. But, after pouring over the Logical Reasoning sections of the last few LSATs, like any good gumshoe detective, I realized that the writers of the exam have left one Logical Reasoning question type on life support: the once mighty(-ish) Must Be False question.

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If You’re Studying for the LSAT, Memorize this List

In an episode of Bob’s Burgers, Tina spends all night practicing a song and dance for her book report on Call of the Wild (which she didn’t read).”You’ll be fine,” says Tina’s mom. “Just remember all the steps … memorize all the lyrics … and don’t mess it up.” For the most part, memorizing for the LSAT has a lot in common with practicing for a report on a book you didn’t read. You’ll be a lot better off working through actual LSAT questions (or just doing the reading for your book report) than you will be trying to take shortcuts.

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

Last Thursday, nothing related to the LSAT was supposed to happen. The scores for the June 2018 LSAT were supposed to be released on Friday, June 29. LSAC made a whole thing about how, instead of jerking around thousands of test takers and capriciously releasing LSAT scores sometime in the days surrounding the time they promised to release the scores (as had been the cases for pretty much every score release), they were going to release the June scores on the day they promised to release them. Which was Friday, June 29.

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Finally, Our Infallible Expert* Makes His Unimpeachable Predictions for the June LSAT

The June LSAT is coming up Monday, so it’s time for our favorite every-few-months ritual: predicting what will be on the LSAT. The usual disclaimer applies — we don’t have any insider knowledge about what’s going to be on Monday’s test. Even if we did, we’d remain silent lest a team of LSAC secret agents show up at our offices with a thirst for vengeance. So, uh, anyway, what follows is a guess. Nothing more, nothing less.

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The Rewards of Rereading

Logical Reasoning stimuli are generally quite dense. In deceptively small paragraphs, they contain nuanced propositions that you can expect to be tested on.

In encountering this complex material, even savvy students can struggle to catch all of the relevant content during their first read. Indeed, I’ve seen this happen with countless 160+ scorers.

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Last-Minute Tips for the June LSAT

With the June LSAT on Monday, June test-takers are in the final stretch. That means that if you’re taking the June exam, you should be honing your skills and putting the finishing touches on your approach. With that in mind, here are some quick reminders for how to approach each section:

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June LSAT Takers: Spend a Little Extra Time on This Stuff

The well-prepared test taker, just like the well-coached basketball team, should be best prepared for the most likely outcome. A well-coached basketball team, like, say the Warriors of the Golden State, should have been exceedingly well-prepared for the most likely outcome playing the Rockets of Houston last night.

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Approaching Resolve and Explain Questions Like a Riddle

It’s a chance to prove to others how smart you are … but usually it ends with you feeling annoyed at the person testing you. No, I’m not talking about the LSAT. I’m talking about riddles! But as it turns out, the Resolve and Explain questions on the Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT look an awful lot like riddles, and by giving you an effective strategy for tackling Resolve/Explain questions, you will also be equipped to reason through the next riddle that gets thrown your way.

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Getting to Know the Implication Family

With classes starting up for the June LSAT, we thought it would be a good idea to do a post covering one of the foundational groups of questions you’ll encounter on the LSAT. At Blueprint, we subdivide one of the big sections of the LSAT — the biggest section, in fact, Logical Reasoning — into three “families.” We’re going to zoom in on one of those families today: the Implication family.

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The Deal with Principles in Logical Reasoning

Principles come up in a few different contexts in Logical Reasoning on the LSAT. Often, the word “principle” makes LSAT students think that there’s something weird or different or special about a question. Questions involving principles are a tiny bit different, but it’s really not a big deal. So let’s work out how to do these questions.