Tag Archive: logical reasoning

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Understanding causal relationships results in a better LSAT score.

Causal relationships are big on the LSAT. Failure to understand them causes problems. Causation comes up all over the place — in reading comp and in a bunch of logical reasoning questions. But causation is especially important in logical reasoning questions that ask you to strengthen or weaken arguments. A high proportion of these questions involve causation somehow.

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The December 2016 LSAT: Instant Recap

Good luck today! Check back here after the exam for information or to add what you know in the comments. We’ll be updating throughout the day.

An important note: LSAC prohibits us from publishing any big specifics from any LSAT (this includes individual questions/answers, trying to identify the experimental section, etc.). So if your comment is removed, it most likely violated some kind of rule or was close enough that we didn’t want to risk it. Here’s a pretty good guide for what’s acceptable.

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Sufficient and Necessary Assumption Questions, Demystified

Halloween may be over, but spookiness still lurks around the corner for LSAT-studiers who are just getting to sufficient and necessary assumption questions. These question types are tricky, and also appear frequently in the Logical Reasoning section, so it’s important to have a firm handle on what each type of assumption means. If all you know is that these question types are sufficient to give you a headache, read on!

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The flawless LSAT taker knows her flaws.

Flaw questions on the LSAT are many things, but unpredictable they ain’t – LSAC loves to use variations on the same flaw, over and over. (That’s one of the reasons why the LSAT is such a learnable test.) Obviously, in order to effectively tackle Flaw questions on the LSAT, you should have a good understanding of the flaws themselves. However, it’s also very helpful to know things that are very rarely flaws – things that show up frequently as an answer choice, but are almost never the correct answer.

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Quantify this!

Quantifiers. Some LSAT students think they’re the enemy. Blueprint classes cover quantifiers (some, most, all, and the valid inferences that can be drawn from those claims) in lesson 3 and it’s a lot of new material at once. It can be scary. But it’s worth getting it down. You’re likely to see quantifiers on a small handful of questions on the LSAT. Having quantifiers down can keep those questions from tying your brain in knots. If you have to figure them out on the spot, it’s not easy. If you know what you need to know, it makes things much more straightforward.

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The LSAT is all about analyzing arguments. Here are some shortcuts.

The folks at LSAC are very good at making a tricky test that (in combination with college GPA) correlates to some degree with first-year law school grades. But creative, they ain’t. As you continue studying for the LSAT, you’ll notice that the test uses the same argument structures over and over.

This is good news for you, the studious test-taker.

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Go quantify yourself.

Some LSAT students fail to learn quantifiers. No one who fails to learn quantifiers has mastered the LSAT.

If you’re scared already, fear not. It’s worth knowing your way around some, most, and all statements and the inferences you can and can’t draw from them. And while it’s worth just memorizing what you can and can’t do with quantifiers, it’ll be easier to memorize the valid inferences if you understand how they work.

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Your Final Weeks of Study, Logical Reasoning Edition

Yesterday, we covered how to brush up on the Reading Comprehension section in the final weeks before the June LSAT. Today, we’ll talk about how to handle the Logical Reasoning section in the coming weeks.

The first thing you’ll notice is that the basic strategy is the same: First, identify weaknesses; then work on your speed and endurance.

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The LSAT 5-Month Study Plan

A few weeks ago, we started a series of posts providing LSAT study plans of varying lengths, using the September 2016 exam as a target. Continuing that series, this post is going to outline a five-month study plan to help you maximize your preparation for the test. As an aside, if you’re not ready to start prepping yet, you don’t need to panic yet. As long as you give yourself at least three months, you should be in an optimal position to succeed.

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The LSAT 6-Month Study Plan

Now that it’s April, the June LSAT is fast approaching. The next test after that in September seems pretty far off. Some students may want to start preparing early, though. Trying to cram all of the material on the LSAT into a few weeks of studying can be very overwhelming. Some prefer to space the process out. For those folks, here is a template to help guide your studying over a six month period.