Tag Archive: logical reasoning

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Speed up!

There is a lot to learn for the LSAT, from diagramming conditionals, to memorizing flaw categories, to wrangling with combo games. The December LSAT is fast approaching, and hopefully students taking the test next month will be familiar with most of the material at this point.

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Conditional Logic: You Can’t Succeed Without It

Conditional statements are at the heart of the LSAT. And that’s no surprise, really, because they’re at the heart of the law as well. If this party breaches contract, then these are the repercussions. Unless this nation comes into compliance with international law, these consequences will follow. If you do not take steps to remediate this violation of my client’s rights, we will take legal action.

While each of the above is a conditional statement, expressing what will result if a particular condition is met or unmet, the phrasing and composition varies significantly between them. The simplest form of a conditional statement involves “if” and “then,” as in “if the frosting-to-cake ration is excessive then I will scrape some off.” Here, of course, the condition of excessive sugar-whip is sufficient to necessitate that I excavate my cake.

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Logical Reasonings / 7.22.15

A) Sorry Facebook, but hand all of it over. WSJ

B) #lawlibpickuplines – ’nuff said. Above The Law

C) Writing is a big thing for prelaws. Here are some resources to help you improve that skill. Pen and Chisel Blog

D) Law students make great pageant contestants. We ain’t mad. Above The Law

E) Who doesn’t love puppies? BuzzFeed

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The LSAT is Coming…dun dun dun

We’re just a few months away from the October LSAT, which means that our courses are ABOUT TO GO DOWN. If you’ve made the (right) decision to sign up with us, we’ve listed some tips to help you get the most out of your course and also some vital life-saving tips that’ll prevent you from totally sh*tting on yourself on that first day. We get it. It happens.

First, a bit about myself. Two years ago, I was gearing up to take an LSAT prep class with Blueprint. I was lucky enough to have Matt Riley as my instructor (he’s one of the founders of Blueprint—he is a fantastic teacher and a great guy). After completing the class and taking the LSAT, I landed a job as an instructor for Blueprint. I taught for a little while before accepting an offer of admission from Columbia. I am now gearing up to begin my second year there! All of that to say, I know the Blueprint course method from both the perspective of a student and the perspective of an instructor. Consider yourself a lucky reader.

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Blueprint’s June LSAT Predicitions

Finally, after years of learning at the Birkenstocked feet of the Blueprint LSAT gurus, my time has come to take the heavy mantle of making predictions for the upcoming LSAT. I have consulted my crystal ball (also known as a wine bottle) veeeery closely and I am finally ready to issue the following predictions:

Logic Games
The June 2014 LSAT was infamous for having a circular game that threw students for a loop (see what I did there?), and the February 2014 LSAT was rumored to have a pretty tough circular game as well. The tests since June 2014 have had Logic Games sections of pretty standard difficulty, so we’re about due for another killer game. So, friends, I’m calling it here — expect a game that falls outside the normal ordering/grouping operations.

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Work More Efficiently, Not Faster

If you’re taking the June LSAT, you’re probably concerned about timing. That’s normal. And here’s some good news: even in the next couple weeks until the LSAT, there’s time to improve.

Imagine this: you have to drive somewhere unfamiliar. There’s traffic. You don’t want to be late. Would you run to the car, say, “I don’t know exactly where it is, but I know it’s vaguely north of here,” and then drive north as fast as you can? You might not know where you’re going, but you’ll screech those tires around corners and gun it from every stoplight, even if you end up stuck in traffic a few seconds later. Or would you check traffic, plot a route that avoids it, and drive a little more sensibly?

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Last Minute Tips: Logical Reasoning

With less than three weeks until the June LSAT, it’s time to buckle down on studying. This week we’re offering one important last-minute tip for each LSAT section. In the last two days, we’ve looked at Reading Comprehension and Logic Games; today we’re talking Logical Reasoning.

The Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT can present an especially good opportunity to tweak your approach in the final weeks of prep. Why? Because many test-takers continually struggle with the same type of Logical Reasoning questions. It may be difficult to identify a pattern until you’ve taken a couple of practice exams, but once you have that practice under your belt, go back and look at all the questions you got wrong (or guessed correctly but didn’t know) on those tests.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.24.15

A) Yesterday we linked to news that law school applications are down for the zillionth (approx.) straight year. Spivey Consulting has more in-depth data.

B) Law schools may be in trouble, but they’ve also been in trouble many times before. Bloomberg

C) And there’s good news about the legal job market! Above the Law

D) There a lot of comic book movies happening, and you probably haven’t even heard of most of them. io9

E) If you like funny things, this 90’s Sizzler commercial is one of them. SIZZLER FOR AMERICAAAAA. YouTube

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Mistaking the Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

A question on the Top Law Schools message board caught our eye this week:

Is there a difference between ‘mistaking the sufficient condition for the necessary condition’ and ‘mistaking the necessary condition for the sufficient condition’? I can sort of see a difference, but I feel like it could be phrased either way and still be the same flaw.

This is a great question.  As it turns out, the two things have slightly different meanings.  If you mistake the sufficient condition for the necessary condition, you treat the thing that really is the necessary condition as if it were the sufficient condition.  If you mistake the necessary condition for the sufficient condition, you treat the thing that really is the necessary condition as if it were the sufficient condition.

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Strategies for the Last Month Before the February LSAT

<GULP!> Today marks one month—one month!—until the February LSAT. That’s a mere thirty-one days or, for those of you who are particularly obsessive, 744 hours. (Stop looking at the clock on your phone, and, no, I won’t break it into seconds for you.)

However you’re counting down, we’re getting down to the wire, and it’s time to put your game face on, turn on the afterburners, lock and load, etc. Choose whatever metaphor motivates you.

Up until now, you should’ve been slowly and methodically practicing questions and concepts without timing yourself.