Tag Archive: lsac

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Logical Reasonings / 3.16.15

A) How to narrow your list of target law schools using rankings and statistics. US News & World Report

B) The dean at University of Iowa College of Law is downplaying their decision to admit students without an LSAT score. Iowa City Press-Citizen

C) LSAC is still fighting efforts to make it easier for students with disabilities to take the LSAT. Stay classy, guys. National Law Journal

D) Can the recorded words of accused murderer (and HBO star) Robert Durst be used against him in court? Possibly. Will it help the prosecution? Possibly. Wall Street Journal

E) Here’s a sneak preview of all the jokes ripping Justin Bieber in his upcoming Comedy Central Roast. I’d feel bad for him if he weren’t Justin Bieber. Vulture

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What Does The Increase In December LSAT Takers Mean?

LSAC recently released data revealing the number of people who took the December LSAT, and for the first time since 2009 that number increased. Sure, only by .8%, but given that the overall number of test-takers has been trending steadily (and steeply) downward, that’s still newsworthy.

If you’re planning on applying to law school soon, you might wonder how this news could affect you. After all, we’ve been saying for quite some time that, since the number of applicants is down, those who do end up applying to law school have better odds. If the number of law school applicants starts increasing again, the level of competition among applicants could increase, too.

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The 2014 LSAT Awards

With 2014 almost through, it’s time for us to hand out the LSATys – our annual awards recognizing things that stood out on this year’s LSATs. So put on your finest and get ready to walk the red carpet. We’ll award each of the following a golden #2 pencil. Or maybe just a regular #2 pencil.

Biggest WTF moment
Every LSAT has hard questions. It’s normal to leave the test center shaking your head at a few of them. But the fourth Logic Game on the June 2014 exam elicited the biggest collective freak-out in a while, possibly since the infamous mauve dinosaurs “dropped” in June 2009.  The game isn’t impossible, and LSAC has put out similar games in the past, but still: that game was weird.

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The LSAT Prep Christmas List

~All I want for Christmas is my No. 2, sharp pencil.~

Right? Something like that?

What a thing to be studying for the LSAT over the holidays. Remember when this time of year was simple? When you anxiously awaited the arrival of Santa, instead of anxiously awaited a random Sunday in February?

But you can still get in the holiday spirit, even as you stress about the February exam. Take your Christmas list, for example. Instead of asking for Tiffany & Co., you could write Santa for a, uh… more practical kind of jewelry.

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How Did You Do on the September LSAT?

Yesterday was the last major milestone in the circle of September LSAT prep (naaaaants ingonyama bagithi baba): score release day.

After weeks of anxiety, preppers got to experience just a little bit more — one final gift from LSAC — as scores rolled out painfully slowly, amid reports of crashes on the LSAC website. But hopefully the wait was worth it.

The September curve came in at -12 (that’s twelve wrong answers for a score of 170), slightly less generous than the previous two LSAT’s, but still more lenient than the historical average. This makes some amount of sense, as most of what we’ve heard suggests a fairly middle of the road exam: no outrageously difficult or surprising sections, but nothing that could be called a cakewalk, either.

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One Week Until LSAT Registration Deadline!

One week. We’re not talking Barenaked Ladies. Or Buster Keaton. Or even Joshua Jackson (although here at Blueprint HQ, we’re always talking Joshua Jackson… ducks fly together, yo).

No, we’re talking about the regular registration deadline for the September LSAT (the late registration deadline is September 5th, which will cost you an extra $70 smackeroos).

You have one more week to decide whether it’s time to take the plunge and sign up, or whether you’re better off waiting until the December exam. If you’re not sure that this is the moment, here’s something to consider.

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In It Together: Advice on Studying for the LSAT With a Partner

Misery loves company, as they say, so if you have a friend who is also studying for the LSAT you’ve probably already discovered the joys of commiserating about the devious questions created for you by LSAC.

That’s all well and good, but perhaps you and your friend have decided to take your relationship to the next level. Perhaps you’re ready to take the leap and start – yep, you guessed it – studying together.

First of all, you’ll want to find a quiet location. Light some candles. Put on some mood music and open a bottle of wine – wait, scratch that last part. In all seriousness, even though studying with a friend might involve more talking than your normal studying, you’ll still want to find a relatively quiet place to work. You’ll likely be spending a fair amount of time working on questions independently, so it’s important that you’re able to concentrate.

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How to Make the Most of Your LSAT Prep Homework Time

If you’re just starting your September LSAT prep, you’re already learning the joys of Logic Games, sufficiency and necessity. Unfortunately, just showing up for class is not sufficient for a good LSAT score. You’ll also need to do your homework, and you’ll need to do it the right way.

The point of LSAT homework is not just to get it done as quickly as possible. If you’re halfheartedly doing your homework with one eye on a rerun of Scrubs, you might as well not be doing it at all. Instead, the goal of LSAT homework is to make sure you fully understand the concepts you’re covering.

That means that you should take as much time as you need per question. Seriously, don’t mark an answer until you’re fully confident in your choice. This early in your prep, there’s no rush.

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Will the September LSAT Continue the Forgiving Curve Trend?

Curves. What a pointy, harsh, angular world it would be without them. And we can also thank them for their help boosting our scaled scores on the LSAT year after year. Recently, however, the LSAT seems to be reaching new heights on the Curvaceous Scale. The December LSAT had a -14 curve for a score of 170, and the June LSAT curve was -13.

Can we expect further blossoming of this trend, or is it soon to deflate?

While it would be a logical fallacy to assume a future outcome on the basis of past performance, we can entertain ourselves with speculation all we like. First, a little background on LSAT curve statistics.

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What to Do If Your June LSAT Score Came Back Lousy

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

If you are disappointed in your LSAT score, you need to start by putting it in perspective. Is your LSAT score really, objectively lousy (for example, in the 130s) or is it lousy based on your abilities, or lousy compared to what a particular law school accepts? If it’s simply that all of your friends did better, or that it won’t give your parents bragging rights, then that’s probably reason to book an hour with a therapist. But if it’s disappointing because of its impact on your goals, here are some strategies to consider:

1. Evaluate reasons for your poor performance.