Tag Archive: LSAT advice

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Ready Player 1

If you’re thinking about taking the LSAT in June, you may feel like you’re in limbo at the moment. Prep classes don’t start for a while, but the LSAT is a beast that can take months to master. So what can you do in the meantime to prepare?

Of course, you can start studying for the test now to get a head start on class. This might be a particularly good idea if you know you won’t have a ton of time to study in the two months leading up to the exam.

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The Rules for Logic Games Rules

There are just ten days left until the February LSAT, and at this point your methods for tackling Logic Games are pretty much settled. However, there’s still time to improve your speed on this all-important section.

As you know, one of the first steps when starting a Logic Game is to visually represent each rule so that you don’t have to keep re-reading the text.

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Skip smart on LR.

With the February exam so painfully close – ack! – you should now be doing a whole lot of time-pressure practice. But just hurrying isn’t going to get you where you need to be. You have to hurry in a smart fashion.

When I was studying for the LSAT back before the wheel was invented (yes, the crusty psychometricians at LSAC are older than time itself, and so am I), I found myself hitting a ceiling. That ceiling was 168.

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How to Tackle Brutal Reading Comp Passages

You’ve been practicing your reading every day for the past two months, reading every “Warning: Slippery Floor” sign and nutritional label at the grocery store, but lo and behold, test day comes, and you get a reading passage with difficult subject matter. It’s something science-y, where every other word in the first paragraph is followed by a comma and its definition.

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Flawesome!

Flaw Questions are the most common single question type on the LSAT. They also happen to be my favorite question type. I love pointing out people’s flaws, but people don’t always appreciate it. Like this one time, a guy at my house was about to say “glad,” but then changed it to “nice,” and it came out “glice.” I tried to point out the error, but somehow I was the bad guy?

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Five Stress-Reduction Tips for the February LSAT

There’s just a little more than two weeks to go before the February LSAT. The pressure is on, the clock is ticking, etc., etc. Most students in our classroom courses have completed Lesson 13 by now – the last lesson with new subject matter – and so it’s time to review and practice under time pressure. Everyone knows this, but not everyone knows that preparing psychologically for the exam is just as important.

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To Retake or Not?

December LSAT scores are out, and that means many students are now facing a tough choice: retake the test or stick with the score you got?

The question is a perennial one, and one that we’ve tackled before here at Most Strongly Supported. According to data from LSAC, most mid-range test takers (those who scored in the 140s and 150s on their previous LSAT) increase their scores by slightly more than two points when they retake it.

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Five Resolutions for the February Exam

Welcome back to the grind, LSAT-takers! The holidays are over, and it’s time to put your game face on because the February LSAT sure ain’t gonna take itself.

On that note, I had the misfortune a few days back of hearing the smarmiest of exchanges on the radio.

Warming up her guest, the host politely inquired, “So, have you laid out your resolutions yet?”

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If it’s important, then you should review it.

Studying for the February exam? If you’re in one of Blueprint’s classroom courses, you’ve made it through the first four lessons and the first workshop. If you’re in the online course – or another course or self-studying for that matter – you should be around the same place in your learning as well: you’ve made it through the foundational material that will underpin and inform the rest of your studies.

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The Way Forward

The December LSAT was this past Saturday, which, huzzah, you’re done with studying for the dang thing. But what if you feel like you didn’t do as well as you wanted?

First of all, did you really do as poorly as you thought you did? Or are you someone who is always convinced that you did terribly after every exam (“I swear, I failed that test!”), but it always turns out that you did fine (“Never mind, I got an A.”)? In other words, are you a Chicken Little, convinced the world is going to end because you might’ve gotten a few problems wrong (which is perfectly normal, by the way)?