Tag Archive: LSAT blog

Philip - LSAT Blog - The LSAT is Coming
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The LSAT is Coming…dun dun dun

We’re just a few months away from the October LSAT, which means that our courses are ABOUT TO GO DOWN. If you’ve made the (right) decision to sign up with us, we’ve listed some tips to help you get the most out of your course and also some vital life-saving tips that’ll prevent you from totally sh*tting on yourself on that first day. We get it. It happens.

First, a bit about myself. Two years ago, I was gearing up to take an LSAT prep class with Blueprint. I was lucky enough to have Matt Riley as my instructor (he’s one of the founders of Blueprint—he is a fantastic teacher and a great guy). After completing the class and taking the LSAT, I landed a job as an instructor for Blueprint. I taught for a little while before accepting an offer of admission from Columbia. I am now gearing up to begin my second year there! All of that to say, I know the Blueprint course method from both the perspective of a student and the perspective of an instructor. Consider yourself a lucky reader.

BPPYuko - LSAT - Blog - My First LSAT
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My First Starbucks Date with the LSAT

Well, there I was at Starbucks. Kids running around, people ordering their drinks in Starbucks-ese, and me, taking my first practice LSAT. I decided to take my first practice test cold. I didn’t know anything about the test. Nada. As luck would have it, Logic Games was my first section.

I better do well. This is like…an IQ test. You can’t study for those things. I think I heard that somewhere. Oprah, or was it Maury? Wait. Of course it isn’t Maury. It’s Oprah, duh. Anyway, focus! There’s only 35 minutes left.

Back when I took the test, logic games were perfectly fitted on a single page. There was no white space whispering, “Hey, write on me, please. It might help you. I like notes.”

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Celebrate Earth Day With This Organic LSAT Logic Game

Happy belated Earth Day! The Earth might be doomed, but you can still save your LSAT score.

We may be a day late and a dollar short, but in honor of the Earth Day yesterday, MSS is happy to bring you an organic, locally sourced, and reusable LSAT Logic Game! Give it a try, and think of it as penance for your high carbon lifestyle.


Three recycling centers, A, B, and C, will each recycle at least one type of material: P, Q, R, and S. The assignment of materials to centers will adhere to the following rules:

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Ask the Right LSAT Prep Questions, Get the Right Answers

As you study for the LSAT, you’re going to have questions. Some things will stump you; it’s all part of the game. Today’s LSAT blog post is about a technique, borrowed from the programming world, that will help you ask better questions and even answer some of your own questions. Don’t get scared and stop reading. No programming knowledge is required. I certainly don’t have any.

Here’s the premise: when you run across something you can’t figure out, ask a duck. You don’t need to go to the local pond; a rubber duck will suffice. Come to think of it, for LSAT purposes, you should really use a toy dinosaur. But I digress.

Ask the duck/dinosaur/rubber chicken your LSAT question. Out loud. Ask in thorough detail; you need to be specific about what exactly you don’t understand. “Dinosaur, I don’t get #23. Can you help?” isn’t going to do anything for you. Dinosaurs are extinct, after all.

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Winner: Check Out Blueprint’s Latest Caption Contest Champ

Sorry, chicks and dudes, but Blueprint LSAT Prep’s latest caption contest is officially closed.

Thanks to all of the entrants. We received a slew of great submissions for the above photo, but alas, there can be only one winner.

Before we find out who, let’s find out what they won: a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games! How about that, huh? There’s something you won’t see in the Showcase Showdown.

Without further ado, here’s the latest champion of an LSAT blog caption contest, as chosen by the Blueprint LSAT Prep staff:

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2014 June LSAT Morning Cometh: Staying Positive, Patient

So after months of studying, practice tests and hard work, you’ve finally taken the 2014 June LSAT. This should be cause for celebration, but maybe you’re not in the most jovial mood. Maybe things didn’t go smoothly for you yesterday. Maybe you’re worried about your LSAT score. And then there was that damned Logic Game. (“What the flip was that, LSAC?!”)

We wouldn’t blame you if these thoughts were running through your mind today. But keep one thing in mind: you’re not the only one. Were you a bit shaky in section 1 yesterday because of the nerves? So were other people. Did you have a less-than-stellar proctoring experience? Chances are someone else’s was worse (read some of the comments from yesterday’s 2014 June LSAT Instant Recap!). And that brutal fourth Logic Game? Yep, join the club.

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The Weekend Before the June LSAT: What to Do Now?

The June LSAT is three days away. In honor of all your pain and suffering, the LSAT blog is bringing you a support group for June LSAT prep survivors: Remaining Calm, Together.

If you’d like to share something with the group, leave us a comment. This is a safe place. Put on some flute music and relax.

You’re Done Prepping for the June LSAT

You did everything you could to prepare, two more days of frantic LSAT cramming will only hurt. Instead, give your brain two days to marinate and relax. Take a first-world shower. Bring a beer or two. Channel your inner Type B personality. It’s almost over.

I’ve seen a number of students improve their LSAT scores after a well-deserved break from studying. I’ve also seen too many students crash by pounding away at their LSAT prep tests until the last minute.

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One Final Week Before the June LSAT: What You Need to Do

The June LSAT is a week away. That doesn’t sound like a lot of time, but you can get a lot done in the next seven days. OK, technically it’s six days, since it’s probably a good idea to have a day of rest before the LSAT. But hey, God created the universe in six days with a day of rest, so you can probably at least manage to squeeze a couple more points out of your LSAT score.

Here are some tips for your final week before the June LSAT:

Keep your foot on the gas.

With only seven days until game time, you mind might start to get clouded with doubts and distractions. Maybe you haven’t reached your target LSAT score yet. You’re worried about how you’re going to perform next Monday and are thinking, “What if I get sick the day before?” “What if I get stuck on a logic game?” “Am I going to have to retake?”

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Down-to-the-Wire Tips for Every Section on the June LSAT

It’s the last week of LSAT prep, and most of you are struggling with a specific section. The LSAT blog is here to help.

In general, you don’t want to focus solely on your weakest LSAT section. It seems counterintuitive, but you’ll progress faster if you mix up your practice. There’s some good science behind this – you can read about it in Make it Stick – or you can just take my word for it.

Let’s get down to specific tips:

If you’re struggling with Reading Comprehension:

Reading Comprehension is probably the most difficult LSAT section to prep for, but improvement is definitely possible.

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5 June LSAT Prep Tips for Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Day weekend is here, which means we’re about two weeks away from the June LSAT. Enjoy yourself: punish your digestive tract with BBQ, and give Black Hawk Down a few goes. But don’t fritter away too much time dreaming about the massive admissions boost you could have gotten if only you had been a Delta Force operator. This time is too important to waste.

Here are some LSAT blog tips to help you make the most of your final big push toward that high June LSAT score:

Tip #1: Make sure you can get the easy points

Diagraming and formal logic are among the most learnable LSAT skills. Make sure you’ve got your sufficient and necessary condition indicators memorized – the trick is that they’re mostly synonyms for each other (every, any, all, each; must, needs, requires, depends). Diagrammable questions should be quick and easy points.