Tag Archive: lsat curve

/ / / / / /

Lessons Learned From the October 2015 LSAT

October LSAT scores came out last week. That means the October LSAT was released into the wild. I was perhaps a little bit too excited to sit down with a timer and take it — it had been a little while since I last took a full test timed. Here’s my overall impression.

/ / / / / / /

Will the September LSAT Continue the Forgiving Curve Trend?

Curves. What a pointy, harsh, angular world it would be without them. And we can also thank them for their help boosting our scaled scores on the LSAT year after year. Recently, however, the LSAT seems to be reaching new heights on the Curvaceous Scale. The December LSAT had a -14 curve for a score of 170, and the June LSAT curve was -13.

Can we expect further blossoming of this trend, or is it soon to deflate?

While it would be a logical fallacy to assume a future outcome on the basis of past performance, we can entertain ourselves with speculation all we like. First, a little background on LSAT curve statistics.

/ / / / /

LSAC Releases 2014 June LSAT Scores: How’d You Do?

You might want to turn off the World Cup and check your email.

LSAC has just released the first batch of 2014 June LSAT scores. If you haven’t received yours yet, don’t panic. LSAC releases LSAT scores in random batches throughout the day. You might get yours at noon. You might get it at midnight. The important thing is, you’re getting it.

So, what stands out about the 2014 June LSAT?

First, let’s start with the curve. The 2014 June LSAT (101 questions) featured an LSAT curve of -13 — meaning you could miss 13 questions and still get a 170 LSAT score.

You could have missed 20 questions for a 165, -29 for a 160, or -46 for a 150.

/ / / / / / / /

Aaron Cohn’s 2014 June LSAT Predictions

The June LSAT is coming up in but a few days, so it’s time for our quarterly exercise of predicting what will appear on the test. I spent a week in the desert chasing visions of the LSAT. I also spent several days hiding in the bushes in the LSAC parking lot to really get in touch with the energy coming from that building. Here’s what I’m feeling:

2014 June LSAT Predictions: Logic Games

February LSAT Logic Games were reported to be a bit unusual. Rumor has it that there was even a circular ordering game, something that hadn’t been on a released LSAT in more than 10 years.

I predict a return to basics for the June LSAT: a little bit of routine ordering, maybe an in and out game, and so on. My crystal ball also says there’ll be a 1:1 ordering game with a bit of a unique twist.

/ / / / / / / / / /

Aaron Cohn’s 2014 February LSAT Predictions

The February LSAT is coming up this weekend, so as usual it’s time for us to predict what delights it’ll hold. I’m honored to take over the LSAT predictions (I didn’t know you were allowed to do it if you’re not named Matt), but I also feel lucky: since the February LSAT is undisclosed, no one will be able to prove me wrong. It’s a nice way to start off, as I get my powers of clairvoyance back into shape.

2014 February LSAT prediction I: Logic Games

The December LSAT had a harder than usual Logic Games section. None of the games was all that bad on its own, but only one was truly easy. Of the others, one was standard but hard, one was a bit unusual and moderately hard, and the last one was typical and moderate.

On the February LSAT, I’d expect a return to the recent trend: one killer game, with the other three being easy-to-moderate and fairly standard. The December LSAT had two rule substitution questions, whereas usually there’s no more than one. Expect a break from those.

/ / / / / / / /

Real LSATs Have Curves: A Look at the 2013 December LSAT

December LSAT scores were released yesterday (for most), and a lot of discussion has centered around the test’s forgiving LSAT curve. According to the 2013 December LSAT score conversion chart, you could miss 14 questions and nonetheless get a 170, or 3 questions for a perfect 180. LSAT scoring scales are pre-equated; in other words, your LSAT score is independent of the performance of the other people who took the LSAT that day. So a forgiving LSAT curve means that this LSAT had relatively hard questions.

And so I sat down early this morning to take the 2013 December LSAT and to try to figure out why the LSAT curve was so forgiving. Question difficulty can be hard to subjectively determine, and can vary a bit from person to person. I fully expected to have to dig deeply to figure out what made this particular test so hard for the average test taker.

/ / / / / / / / / / / / /

The February LSAT is Weird, But Weird Can Be Good

If you plan on taking the February LSAT, then today would be a good day to start studying. But, if you’re superstitious about doing anything on Friday the 13th, or you’re not sure about taking the February LSAT, then I have some advice for you.

The February LSAT is kind of weird. For all the other LSAT administrations you will have exactly one “experimental” section, but for the February LSAT the whole thing, in two ways, is “experimental.”

First, some of the content might be slightly weird or unusual. Maybe you’ll get a prompt that’s going to be hard to pin to a question type. Maybe a weird Logic Game intro will show up. Such things shouldn’t be a major issue for you. If anything truly weird or unusual comes up, it will be weird and unusual for everyone, and the LSAT score “curve” will reflect this.

/ / / / / / / / / / / /

Unwrapping the Tricks and Treats of the 2013 October LSAT

The 2013 October LSAT was another one for the ages, dear readers.

Yesterday, LSAC released October LSAT scores, not mention the test itself. So now we can check our LSAT blog predictions and our 2013 October LSAT Instant Recap to see how well they captured the feel of the test.

First off, the 2013 October LSAT curve:

170 = -12
160 = -27
152 = -41

A pretty standard LSAT curve for a pretty standard LSAT.

/ / / / /

The Morning Cometh: Reaction to the 2013 October LSAT

The Monday after an LSAT can often feel like the day after a bad breakup. So, I’m gonna do for you what I do for all my friends during their dark times. Ladies, I want you to take a dose of Shania Twain. Fellas, I’m prescribing you some Salt ‘N Pepa. And, for the sake of avoiding Exclusivity Flaws, everyone else should enjoy some Gloria Gaynor.

2013 October LSAT Morning Cometh: Difficulty

I’ve surveyed the Internet’s most reliable October LSAT rumor mills (including our LSAT blog’s very own 2013 October LSAT Instant Recap) and it seems like the October LSAT was pretty straightforward. Sure, there seems to have been a difficult Logic Game, but there’s always at least one.

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

The Morning Cometh: Reaction to the 2013 June LSAT

Last year’s June LSAT saw the surprise introduction of two-page Logic Games. In retrospect, that’s a tough act to follow. It’s been a day since this year’s June LSAT, and this time there were no such surprises. Everything went pretty much according to expectation.

I’ve heard from a number of students who took the June LSAT (as well as checked out yesterday’s 2013 June LSAT Instant Recap) and no one I’ve talked to was too surprised by anything on the test. With a few small exceptions, the consensus seems that it was a typical LSAT.

The Logical Reasoning sections from yesterday’s June LSAT seem to have been fairly unremarkable in difficulty. There were easy questions, medium questions and hard questions, as there always are. Some rare question types made appearances: crux questions continue their recent streak, and if you though agree questions were dead, they were only just hibernating.