Tag Archive: lsat flaws

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LSAT Flaws in Real Life: Johnny Football is Johnny Fallacy

If you’re studying for the LSAT, you’ve probably begun to notice that the test loves to ask questions regarding flaws in Logical Reasoning. At first, these flaws can seem somewhat ethereal and abstruse, but in time they will become clearer. One way that I practiced recognizing flaws was by noticing their prevalence in popular culture. This post will focus on the flawed reasoning directed toward a lightning rod figure in pop culture — Johnny Manziel.

Johnny Manziel LSAT Flaw #1: Ad Hominem

Ad Hominem flaws arise when someone attacks the arguer rather than the argument itself. For example, if I said that Donald Trump is wrong about L’Oreal products being superior to other hair care products because he himself has almost no natural hair left (or because he uses Dove products), then I would be guilty committing this type of flawed reasoning.

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Down-to-the-Wire Tips for Every Section on the June LSAT

It’s the last week of LSAT prep, and most of you are struggling with a specific section. The LSAT blog is here to help.

In general, you don’t want to focus solely on your weakest LSAT section. It seems counterintuitive, but you’ll progress faster if you mix up your practice. There’s some good science behind this – you can read about it in Make it Stick – or you can just take my word for it.

Let’s get down to specific tips:

If you’re struggling with Reading Comprehension:

Reading Comprehension is probably the most difficult LSAT section to prep for, but improvement is definitely possible.

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Reader Q: What’s the Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question?

Last week on Twitter, a reader asked us what type of LSAT question is the most difficult. That’s actually a trickier question than you may think, for a couple reasons: First, there’s plenty of variation within each question type. There are easy and really hard questions among every question type. And secondly, it depends a lot on the LSAT test-taker. You probably have your own personal favorites and least favorites.

But answering tricky questions is how we roll here, so here are our contenders for the most difficult LSAT questions – and how to tackle ‘em.

The Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question I: Laura says LG rule substitution questions

You know those questions on LSAT Logic Games where it asks you to replace one of the rules in the game with a new rule that has the safe effect?

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12 Tasks That Will Turn You Into an LSAT Hercules

The Legend of Hercules opens in theaters today. In honor of this latest rehashed plot, here are the 12 Herculean LSAT Tasks that will forgive you for the sins you’ve committed against your LSAT score — like taking practice tests in the afternoon, or doing them in pen.

Herculean LSAT Task I: Memorize the Common LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaws

For your first Herculean LSAT task, I want you to memorize all of the common LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaws. On any given LSAT, knowing these flaws will be the key to getting the right answer for at least 40 questions. Let that sink in.

Blueprint LSAT Prep students, you know where to find these in your books.

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LSAT in Real Life: Finding Flaws in the Affluenza Defense

If you’ve been living under a rock (or studiously avoiding news articles on this story, as I had been unti I sat down to write this LSAT blog post), you might not have heard about the “affluenza” hoopla that hit the news last week.

Here’s the quick rundown of the story: A 16-year-old boy in Texas was driving with a BAC level three times the legal limit when he lost control of his truck and killed four nearby pedestrians. When he was on trial for manslaughter, the defense attorneys argued that he needed rehabilitation, not jail time, because his wealthy parents hadn’t taught him a sense of personal responsibility. A witness for the defense said the kid had “affluenza” – he’d been taught that money could solve any and all problems.

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Toronto Mayor Rob Ford’s LSAT Flaws Will Crack You Up

In case you haven’t heard, Toronto mayor Rob Ford recently admitted to smoking crack. His staffers have gone to the police with concerns about his alcohol abuse, which includes drinking and driving and swilling vodka bottle after vodka bottle in high school parking lots. His driver has been arrested on drug dealing charges. Is Ford going to resign? His answer is an emphatic no. And unless he’s convicted of a crime, there’s nothing anyone can do to remove him from office.

Toronto holds a special place on the LSAT. LSAC is often keen on reminding LSAT test takers that the LSAT is used for Canadian law schools, too. As a result, I’d wager that Toronto is one of the most used names for a variable in the LSAT Logic Games section. We’ll take a look here at some of the flawed logic surrounding Mayor Ford’s situation:

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Looking Back at the Government Shutdown’s LSAT Flaws

Last week, the United States House and Senate finally managed to get past their differences and reopen the federal government just before things would have become a bit hairy with the debt limit. All told, the shutdown went on for 17 days, and involved lots of frustration, brinksmanship, and flawed logic. Since this is an LSAT blog, the last part is what we’ll focus on here.

Government Shutdown Flaw I:

“Since the government was shut down, and running the government costs money, we must have at least saved money in this whole affair.”

This is what I think calling the shutdown a “slimdown” is intended to imply.

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Top 3 Questions I Receive in LSAT Tutoring

After tutoring dozens of students over the last couple years, I’ve noticed that I get asked about a few things over and over. While I hate to risk putting myself out of work by sharing my secrets, I’m catching up on Mad Men on Netflix and every hour of tutoring is an hour that I’m missing out on watching Don’s antics. So without further ado, here are the top three questions I hear in LSAT tutoring, as well as some tips for solving each.

1. Trouble finding deductions in LSAT Logic Games

Deductions are amazing and life-saving for LSAT Logic Games, but they can be a big stumbling block for some students. My tutorees aren’t sure how to find them, and they aren’t sure how to tell when they’ve found all of the deductions and can proceed to the questions.

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These Tour de France Part to Whole LSAT Flaws are Dope

If you have the will — and the stamina — to spend about four hours a day watching men exercise in tight-fitting clothes, then you probably already know that Chris Froome has won the Tour de France. The Tour is a showcase for mental toughness, advanced materials, aerodynamic research, and, unfortunately, pharmaceutical science. Blood doping and EPOs probably won’t help you do better on the LSAT, but using cycling to understanding the tricky Part to Whole flaw will.

Tour de France Part to Whole LSAT Flaw #1: The Fastest Riders Make The Fastest Team

Let’s say that Team Merck has the best coach, the fastest climber, the fastest time trialist, the fastest sprinter, and the fastest domestique (the guy who brings everyone their water bottles and snacks).

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These LSAT Flaws Might Be Aaron Hernandez’s Best Defense

In case you haven’t heard about the investigation surrounding New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, here’s a quick recap.

Aaron Hernandez and Odin Lloyd, a semipro football player who was dating Hernandez’s girlfriend’s sister, were out drinking one night last week. The two of them, along with two other men, left in Hernandez’s SUV. Later, there were only 3. Lloyd’s body was found a mile from Hernandez’s home the next day. He had been shot, execution style.

Then the investigation began. Police discovered that Hernandez had destroyed his house’s security system, which could have recorded video. Asked to hand over his cell phone, Hernandez complied. But the phone was in pieces.