Tag Archive: LSAT logic games

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Test Your Skills on the Toughest LSAT Logic Games Ever

With the October LSAT just around the corner, you should be in the refining stages for each of the three question types. This includes Logic Games, which – as perhaps the most learnable section – is a great place to invest some fine-tuning.

Once you’ve mastered the fundamentals, one great way to get prepared for LG is to challenge yourself with some of the hardest Games known to mankind. Additionally, practicing on these Games will familiarize you with the identifying characteristics of uniquely challenging games, enabling you to pick them out of the lineup on test day.

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What to Do If Your June LSAT Score Came Back Lousy

Today on the LSAT blog: a guest post by Law School Expert Ann Levine, the former director of admissions for two ABA-approved law schools and the author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert and The Law School Decision Game: A Playbook for Prospective Lawyers.

If you are disappointed in your LSAT score, you need to start by putting it in perspective. Is your LSAT score really, objectively lousy (for example, in the 130s) or is it lousy based on your abilities, or lousy compared to what a particular law school accepts? If it’s simply that all of your friends did better, or that it won’t give your parents bragging rights, then that’s probably reason to book an hour with a therapist. But if it’s disappointing because of its impact on your goals, here are some strategies to consider:

1. Evaluate reasons for your poor performance.

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Logical Reasonings / 6.30.14

A) Slate is at it again. They really want you to go to law school. Slate.

B) Nice to see we’re not the only ones who make up imaginary LSAT Logic Games. McSweeney’s.

C) There’s nothing wrong with a law school addendum — as long as it gets the right point across. Law Admissions Lowdown.

D) You might’ve seen the Supreme Court in the news today. Here’s why. CNN.

E) And here are six other Supreme Court decisions you might’ve missed. Clickhole.

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Prepping for LSAT Prep: How to Get a Head Start on Studying

If you’re planning on taking a class to prepare for the September LSAT (say, perhaps, one of Blueprint’s soon-to-begin classes), you may be wondering what you should be doing to prepare before class starts.

The good news is that you don’t need to do much. The point of an LSAT class is to teach you the skills you’ll need to conquer the LSAT. There are no prerequisites, and the LSAT doesn’t test any kind of specialized knowledge or anything you’d need to start memorizing.

The most important thing you can do before LSAT class starts, then, is to have fun. Once class starts, you’re going to have to work your, uh, donkey off. You’ll have homework to do and practice tests to review. Variables from LSAT Logic Games will dance through your dreams, and you’ll be that person who always points out the flawed logic in everything your (soon to be former) friends say.

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Winner: Check Out Blueprint’s Latest Caption Contest Champ

Sorry, chicks and dudes, but Blueprint LSAT Prep’s latest caption contest is officially closed.

Thanks to all of the entrants. We received a slew of great submissions for the above photo, but alas, there can be only one winner.

Before we find out who, let’s find out what they won: a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games! How about that, huh? There’s something you won’t see in the Showcase Showdown.

Without further ado, here’s the latest champion of an LSAT blog caption contest, as chosen by the Blueprint LSAT Prep staff:

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Caption Contest for a Free Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games

Blueprint LSAT Prep’s latest caption contest is all business in the front, party in the back.

That’s because you’re just one funny comment away from winning a free copy of our LSAT book, The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games. All you have to do is submit a funny, LSAT or prelaw-related caption for the above photo. We’ll pick our favorite one, and the lucky scribe will win a free LSAT book. Ain’t no thing but a chicken wing, right?

The key is to be creative. Here are some past examples of Most Strongly Supported caption contest winners, to give you an idea.

We’ll announce the winner next week right here on the LSAT blog.

If you’ve already won a caption contest on the LSAT blog before, sorry, but you’re not eligible.

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5 June LSAT Prep Tips for Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Day weekend is here, which means we’re about two weeks away from the June LSAT. Enjoy yourself: punish your digestive tract with BBQ, and give Black Hawk Down a few goes. But don’t fritter away too much time dreaming about the massive admissions boost you could have gotten if only you had been a Delta Force operator. This time is too important to waste.

Here are some LSAT blog tips to help you make the most of your final big push toward that high June LSAT score:

Tip #1: Make sure you can get the easy points

Diagraming and formal logic are among the most learnable LSAT skills. Make sure you’ve got your sufficient and necessary condition indicators memorized – the trick is that they’re mostly synonyms for each other (every, any, all, each; must, needs, requires, depends). Diagrammable questions should be quick and easy points.

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3 Tips for the Final 3 Weeks of June LSAT Prep

With three weeks left until the June LSAT, things are getting real. Now is not a time for panic, but focus; you can get a lot done in the upcoming days with the right mindset. Here are three tips that will help you maximize your potential over the next three weeks:

Tip #1 for the Final 3 Weeks of June LSAT Prep: Don’t just take practice LSATs – study them.

We all have been taught the importance of practice exams. Taking a whole bunch of them will help build the endurance you’ll need when your brain starts to get tired in that third hour. But when it comes to practice LSATs, quality is just important as quantity. The key to getting the most out of your exams is setting aside the time to properly review them. This goes beyond just looking up explanations for the questions you got wrong. Really try and study your results. What categories of LR questions are you missing the most?

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First-Hand Advice on Juggling Finals and June LSAT Prep

The June LSAT is a beautiful thing. The afternoon start time means you get to sleep in. The early administration means you’ll have your LSAT score before the application cycle even begins. But for all its virtues, the June LSAT has one nasty secret: if you’re a college student, those last four crucial weeks of studying are going to overlap with your final exams. Yikes.

Thankfully, juggling LSAT prep with your finals is possible. As someone who took the June LSAT as a college student and survived, I thought I’d take a moment to give my two cents about what I learned from the experience. If you do it right, juggling final exams with your LSAT prep won’t feel like “juggling” at all.

Balancing finals with the LSAT means you have a good amount of work to do in a limited amount of time.

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Logical Reasonings / 5.12.14

A) LSAT Logic Games are a piece of cake…at some point…right? Law Admissions Lowdown.

B) If spurious correlations are your favorite part of the LSAT, you’re going to love this blog. Spurious Correlations.

C) Remember that law school grad who beheaded an exotic bird in Vegas? Probation. San Francisco Gate.

D) Meet the new CEO of the Los Angeles Clippers, who happens to be Albany Law School’s finest alumni. WNYT.

E) These stock photos are only good for laughing at, but they’re worth it. BuzzFeed.