Tag Archive: LSAT logic games

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First-Hand Advice on Juggling Finals and June LSAT Prep

The June LSAT is a beautiful thing. The afternoon start time means you get to sleep in. The early administration means you’ll have your LSAT score before the application cycle even begins. But for all its virtues, the June LSAT has one nasty secret: if you’re a college student, those last four crucial weeks of studying are going to overlap with your final exams. Yikes.

Thankfully, juggling LSAT prep with your finals is possible. As someone who took the June LSAT as a college student and survived, I thought I’d take a moment to give my two cents about what I learned from the experience. If you do it right, juggling final exams with your LSAT prep won’t feel like “juggling” at all.

Balancing finals with the LSAT means you have a good amount of work to do in a limited amount of time.

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Logical Reasonings / 5.12.14

A) LSAT Logic Games are a piece of cake…at some point…right? Law Admissions Lowdown.

B) If spurious correlations are your favorite part of the LSAT, you’re going to love this blog. Spurious Correlations.

C) Remember that law school grad who beheaded an exotic bird in Vegas? Probation. San Francisco Gate.

D) Meet the new CEO of the Los Angeles Clippers, who happens to be Albany Law School’s finest alumni. WNYT.

E) These stock photos are only good for laughing at, but they’re worth it. BuzzFeed.

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The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games Caption Contest Winner

Put away your hazmat suits, folks. Blueprint LSAT Prep’s latest caption contest is over.

We received a handful of submissions for funny captions based on the photo above, but only one earned its writer a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games. So thanks to all who submitted, but congrats to Alex Crownhart on the winning entry:

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Cinco de Mayo’s Cinco de LSAT Tips

Cinco de Mayo is here! It’s kind of like the Fourth of July but with less Bruce Springsteen and more accordions. This holiday has a varied significance, but for us at the LSAT blog, Cinco de Mayo means that there is one month left before the June LSAT. Don’t panic. Panic doesn’t mix well with a belly full of tacos and tequila.

To help you get over the guilt of getting drunk on a Monday, here are five tips to improve your LSAT score:

LSAT Tip Numero Uno: Memorize your Logical Reasoning flaws

The June LSAT will spend at least 50 questions testing your knowledge of a dozen common logical reasoning flaws. Most LSAT questions involve describing, exploiting, fixing, or avoiding flawed reasoning. If you don’t know your flaws, your June LSAT will be more disappointing than a piñata filled with raisins and black licorice.

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Logical Reasonings / 5.5.14

A) You’re running out of time to enter our latest caption contest for a chance at a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games. Most Strongly Supported.

B) Going to law school is great. Going to a good law school is better. Above the Law.

C) The Supreme Court ruled that town hall prayer does not violate the separation of church and state. Wall Street Journal.

D) Watch out for lawyer bills. They can be full of shenanigans. ABA Journal.

E) This Cinco de Mayo, watch out for Hurricane Ashley. The Onion.

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Caption Contest: Win a Free Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games

Put on your hazmat suit. It’s time for another Blueprint LSAT Prep caption contest.

Comment below with the funniest pre-law-related caption for the above photo, and you could win a free copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games. We’ll announce one winner — picked by the Blueprint LSAT Prep staff — next week right here on the LSAT blog.

Limit one entry per person. Previous Blueprint LSAT Prep contest winners are ineligible.

Remember to keep your comment funny but unoffensive. If you need inspiration, here are some previous caption contests we’ve run on the LSAT blog.

That being said…fire away!

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The Keys to Becoming an LSAT Diagramming Master

Diagramming is an essential skill on the LSAT, but it’s also a bit like speaking a foreign language. At first you will feel awkward and clumsy and slow; then suddenly you’re spitting out full sentences and fully understanding the answers and you wonder why you ever had such a problem with it.

What is diagramming and why is it important on the LSAT?

Diagramming is a shorthand way of representing conditional statements (otherwise known as if-then statements). I don’t have enough space to fully get into the basics here, but if you’re studying for the LSAT and you’re not comfortable or familiar with conditional logic, you should do yourself a solid and look it up.

Diagramming crops up mainly on the Logical Reasoning sections and on Logic Games (for instance, Tanika is in every photo that Morlanda is in).

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The Role of Luck on the LSAT (and How to Prepare for it)

Today, all across the US and Canada (this is an LSAT blog, after all), many people of Irish heritage and not-one-bit-Irish heritage alike will celebrate St. Patrick by wearing green, drinking things that are green but aren’t normally supposed to be (If I must drink something green, make it a Chartreuse and soda), and generally carousing about town getting utterly plastered.

Nonetheless, it makes for a good excuse to discuss the role of luck in the LSAT. For the most part, the LSAT is a predictable test. Practice tests will generally give you a good gauge of where you stand. But at the margins, chance can play a role on LSAT test day. Here are some ways it can factor in.

How Luck Plays a Role on the LSAT I: The experimental section

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Reader Q: What’s the Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question?

Last week on Twitter, a reader asked us what type of LSAT question is the most difficult. That’s actually a trickier question than you may think, for a couple reasons: First, there’s plenty of variation within each question type. There are easy and really hard questions among every question type. And secondly, it depends a lot on the LSAT test-taker. You probably have your own personal favorites and least favorites.

But answering tricky questions is how we roll here, so here are our contenders for the most difficult LSAT questions – and how to tackle ‘em.

The Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question I: Laura says LG rule substitution questions

You know those questions on LSAT Logic Games where it asks you to replace one of the rules in the game with a new rule that has the safe effect?

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Less Than 24 Hours to Cancel Your February LSAT Score

So it’s been a few days since you took the February LSAT, and you’re feeling not-so-good. Now you must decide: do you keep your February LSAT score and hope for the best, or do you assume the worst and cancel? The deadline is tomorrow, so it’s time to make up your mind.

First, the nuts and bolts: if you cancel, neither you nor law schools will ever know what you would have scored on the February LSAT. Law schools will see that you took the test and canceled your LSAT score, but one cancellation is no big deal at all. A cancelled LSAT score counts toward your limit of three LSAT administrations in two years.

In this day and age, it’s easy to buy anything from books to cars to sex to drugs online (or so I hear). But cancelling your LSAT score must still be done by old-fashioned means: by fax or overnight mail. You can, however, download the form and get more information from LSAC.