Tag Archive: lsat logical reasoning

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A Necessary Skill for Acing the LSAT

In case you hadn’t already noticed, understanding and manipulating conditional statements is key to success on Logical Reasoning questions. If you don’t master this skill, then your target score will elude you (ya see what I did there?). 

In our ongoing series we’ve covered many of the trickier types of conditional statements, but today we’re going to bring it back to basics with identifying the necessary condition through what we at Blueprint call “indicator words.” 

This skill is fundamental in the sense that it’s necessary (dry puns abound) in order to get your diagramming off the ground. If the necessary and sufficient conditions are misinterpreted and thus diagrammed incorrectly, transitive chains will be missed, sufficient stacks will go unnoticed, etc., etc. Most common, perhaps, is confusing which of two statements in a sentence is the sufficient and which is the necessary.

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Oh, Yes: How to Diagram “No” Statements on the LSAT

With a scurry and dash, a dodge and a slash, the No Ninja appears on the scene. Or: There She Blows, No Torpedoes the Necessary. Maybe, I don’t know…Calamatizes the Consequent, Foils the Following, what have you. 

All of these mnemonics illustrate a very simple but highly effective tool for diagramming “No” statements on the LSAT. These are common conditionals, and they can come in many forms:

· No mathletes have girlfriends.
· None of the above are correct.
· Neither of them are getting her number.
· No one who dislikes Star Wars can be my friend.

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How to Diagram “Unless” LSAT Logical Reasoning Questions

Welcome to our ongoing series on the more nefarious elements of diagramming.

Topping the agenda today are “unless” questions. These are much more straightforward than the “only” conditionals we reviewed last week. Unlike “only” questions, which require one to search for the referent, “unless” questions have a more standardized approach. Consider the following:

“Unless I just brushed my teeth, you’ll find me sipping a cold glass of orange juice”

What does this mean? It tells us that, in all cases where I haven’t just finished brushing my teeth, I’ve got a tall glass of nature’s goodness by my side. To simplify: if I have not just brushed, then I’ve got OJ. Look diagrammable?

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5 June LSAT Prep Tips for Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Day weekend is here, which means we’re about two weeks away from the June LSAT. Enjoy yourself: punish your digestive tract with BBQ, and give Black Hawk Down a few goes. But don’t fritter away too much time dreaming about the massive admissions boost you could have gotten if only you had been a Delta Force operator. This time is too important to waste.

Here are some LSAT blog tips to help you make the most of your final big push toward that high June LSAT score:

Tip #1: Make sure you can get the easy points

Diagraming and formal logic are among the most learnable LSAT skills. Make sure you’ve got your sufficient and necessary condition indicators memorized – the trick is that they’re mostly synonyms for each other (every, any, all, each; must, needs, requires, depends). Diagrammable questions should be quick and easy points.

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Logical Reasonings / 4.14.14

A) Trouble with LSAT Logical Reasoning? Here are some tips. Law Admissions Lowdown.

B) When it comes to law school tuition, haters gonna hate. Above the Law.

C) Tomorrow, Google Glass goes on sale to the public. Legal experts already have headaches. ABA Journal.

D) The trial is set to begin for the Florida man accused of shooting a fellow moviegoer for texting. CNN.

E) The Masters were pretty great this year, but the Mini Masters were better. Digg.

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The Role of Luck on the LSAT (and How to Prepare for it)

Today, all across the US and Canada (this is an LSAT blog, after all), many people of Irish heritage and not-one-bit-Irish heritage alike will celebrate St. Patrick by wearing green, drinking things that are green but aren’t normally supposed to be (If I must drink something green, make it a Chartreuse and soda), and generally carousing about town getting utterly plastered.

Nonetheless, it makes for a good excuse to discuss the role of luck in the LSAT. For the most part, the LSAT is a predictable test. Practice tests will generally give you a good gauge of where you stand. But at the margins, chance can play a role on LSAT test day. Here are some ways it can factor in.

How Luck Plays a Role on the LSAT I: The experimental section

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Reader Q: What’s the Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question?

Last week on Twitter, a reader asked us what type of LSAT question is the most difficult. That’s actually a trickier question than you may think, for a couple reasons: First, there’s plenty of variation within each question type. There are easy and really hard questions among every question type. And secondly, it depends a lot on the LSAT test-taker. You probably have your own personal favorites and least favorites.

But answering tricky questions is how we roll here, so here are our contenders for the most difficult LSAT questions – and how to tackle ‘em.

The Most Difficult Type of LSAT Question I: Laura says LG rule substitution questions

You know those questions on LSAT Logic Games where it asks you to replace one of the rules in the game with a new rule that has the safe effect?

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12 Tasks That Will Turn You Into an LSAT Hercules

The Legend of Hercules opens in theaters today. In honor of this latest rehashed plot, here are the 12 Herculean LSAT Tasks that will forgive you for the sins you’ve committed against your LSAT score — like taking practice tests in the afternoon, or doing them in pen.

Herculean LSAT Task I: Memorize the Common LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaws

For your first Herculean LSAT task, I want you to memorize all of the common LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaws. On any given LSAT, knowing these flaws will be the key to getting the right answer for at least 40 questions. Let that sink in.

Blueprint LSAT Prep students, you know where to find these in your books.

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Daylight Savings: An Extra Hour For December LSAT Prep

Early in the morning this upcoming Sunday, daylight savings time will end (unless you live in Arizona, of course). Right at the instant that clocks would have switched over from 1:59:59 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., they’ll click right back to 1:00 a.m. This has the strange effect that there will be two times an hour apart that are both called 1:30 AM.

If you’re preparing for the December LSAT, this means you have one more hour than you thought before LSAT test day. It’s time to think about how you’ll use it.

In California at least, you definitely don’t get an extra hour to drink. Even though closing time is 2 a.m., and 1 a.m. is generally considered to be before 2 a.m., state law is explicit on the subject: on daylight savings night, sale of alcoholic beverages must cease two hours after midnight, regardless of what the clock may say.

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Matt Shinners’s 2013 October LSAT Predictions

October. The month of terrifying things. Ghosts. Zombies. Sparkly vampires. And the LSAT.

Whereas we know what to expect from those monsters, the LSAT is an unknown quantity, and thus most terrifying of all. Luckily, I’m here with my Ouija board and a bottle of Scotch to look into the future and see what awaits you all this weekend on the October LSAT.

2013 October LSAT Prediction I: Logic Games

The June LSAT Logic Games were fairly straightforward, except for one killer game. Even our mystery instructor who sat for the June LSAT was momentarily tripped up by it.

So what to expect after an average section with a hard game? A slightly harder than average section without any particularly hard game!