Tag Archive: lsat logical reasoning

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October LSAT Prep Should Be Shifting Into High Gear

The October LSAT is coming up in 19 days. It’s time to talk about speed: you should have covered more or less everything the LSAT might throw at you by now, so now it’s your job to figure out how to do it faster.

One of the first keys to picking up the pace is knowing what you’re doing. If you’re still hazy on identifying LSAT Logical Reasoning questions, or on how to approach some of them, now’s the time to work that out. If you’re not sure how to symbolize some common rules on LSAT Logic Games, get that squared away STAT. Being unsure how to approach things wastes a lot of time. And being confident in what to do, step by step, makes things go by much faster.

Time yourself as you practice, and pick up the pace gradually. Try to work more efficiently, not just faster.

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In or Out?: October LSAT Early Withdraw Deadline Tomorrow

Tomorrow is your last chance to get a partial refund for your October LSAT registration. If you haven’t done any LSAT prep yet, then you should probably withdraw your registration or change your LSAT test date.

If you have been studying for the past month, then you might not like your current practice LSAT score, but at this point few people do. You’ll see your best practice LSAT score sometime in the last week before the October LSAT. So, don’t rush to withdraw your LSAT registration just because you’re not hitting your ideal score yet.

It’s very common to feel overwhelmed and insecure at this point in your LSAT prep. The LSAT is tough, and there are a lot of concepts to learn. But right now you deserve to be happy with yourself if you’ve been studying hard.

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Take a Small Break From LSAT Prep Over Labor Day Weekend

Labor Day Weekend is here and all of you deserve to take a day off and go nuts on the potato salad and hotdogs. Taking a short break from your October LSAT prep can help your LSAT score. So by all means, take a day this weekend to unwind.

Of course, you can’t afford to take the whole weekend off. You want to save your days of rest for the two weeks before the LAST. In those two weeks the most important thing is to be relaxed, well rested, and confident. But right now, you can afford to be tough on yourself.

At a minimum you should have your LSAT Logical Reasoning flaws memorized. Your success on Logical Reasoning questions depends on identifying flawed reasoning, and avoiding it yourself.

If you can follow a recipe, you can do well on the LSAT Logic Games section.

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Which NFL Players Would You Pick in an LSAT Fantasy Draft?

Today marks the last week of preseason games in the National Football League. This means National Football League season ticket holders are going through the annual ritual of trying to get rid of the National Football League preseason tickets they’re obligated to buy.

It also means that many National Football League fans are preparing to draft players for their National Football League fantasy teams. The question is, what if you were to draft some of these muscle-heads for an LSAT fantasy team? Let’s explore that idea.

(Since I don’t actually work for the sports media, I’m exempt from the requirement to say the full words “National Football League” as much as possible. I’ll stop now.)

Maybe my hometown bias is showing through, but I’ll start with San Francisco’s Colin Kaepernick, one of the most promising young quarterbacks in the league. Why? For his versatility.

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Top 3 Questions I Receive in LSAT Tutoring

After tutoring dozens of students over the last couple years, I’ve noticed that I get asked about a few things over and over. While I hate to risk putting myself out of work by sharing my secrets, I’m catching up on Mad Men on Netflix and every hour of tutoring is an hour that I’m missing out on watching Don’s antics. So without further ado, here are the top three questions I hear in LSAT tutoring, as well as some tips for solving each.

1. Trouble finding deductions in LSAT Logic Games

Deductions are amazing and life-saving for LSAT Logic Games, but they can be a big stumbling block for some students. My tutorees aren’t sure how to find them, and they aren’t sure how to tell when they’ve found all of the deductions and can proceed to the questions.

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Level Up Your LSAT Diagramming Skills With This Fun Quiz

Knowing how to diagram conditional claims is essential for every scored section of the LSAT. In LSAT Logical Reasoning, you have to diagram conditional claims very often with Must Be True, Must Be False, Could Be True, Sufficient, Necessary, Flaw, Parallel, and Parallel Flaw question types. In LSAT Logic Games, you’ll make some very nasty mistakes by incorrectly diagraming conditional rules. Finally, in LSAT Reading Comprehension, main points can be conditional, and many other question types will also depend on your ability to diagram.

All diagramable questions have very tempting sucker choices. This is because diagraming mistakes are easy to predict. So, an incorrect anticipation will probably show up in your answer choices. This makes diagramable questions pretty difficult.

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The Morning Cometh: Reaction to the 2013 June LSAT

Last year’s June LSAT saw the surprise introduction of two-page Logic Games. In retrospect, that’s a tough act to follow. It’s been a day since this year’s June LSAT, and this time there were no such surprises. Everything went pretty much according to expectation.

I’ve heard from a number of students who took the June LSAT (as well as checked out yesterday’s 2013 June LSAT Instant Recap) and no one I’ve talked to was too surprised by anything on the test. With a few small exceptions, the consensus seems that it was a typical LSAT.

The Logical Reasoning sections from yesterday’s June LSAT seem to have been fairly unremarkable in difficulty. There were easy questions, medium questions and hard questions, as there always are. Some rare question types made appearances: crux questions continue their recent streak, and if you though agree questions were dead, they were only just hibernating.

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3 Keys to Avoid Getting Upset by the LSAT

As you might have noticed, the NCAA March Madness tournament is underway — accompanied as usual by lower productivity in offices all across the land (or not?) and lots of illegal gambling. And upsets. While it’s too early to know whether this year will have any memorable Cinderella story, some high seeds have already fallen to their lower-seeded opponents, with consequences reaching millions of brackets.

If you’re taking the LSAT, you, too, need to avoid getting upset. There are lessons to take from these March Madness games.

How to Avoid Getting Upset by the LSAT I: Avoid overconfidence

New Mexico coach Steve Alford complained earlier this season about what he saw as disrespect for the Mountain West Conference, to which his team belongs, in the polls.

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Matt Shinners’s 2013 February LSAT Predictions

UPDATE: LSAC has closed some February LSAT testing centers in the northeast due to an approaching blizzard. Check this LSAT blog post for more.

Making predictions for the February LSAT is a liberating experience. As the only unreleased LSAT of the year, I can say pretty much anything without fear of being proven wrong.

Plus, I can’t get it as wrong as those Mayans, amirite?

2013 February LSAT Prediction I: Logic Games

Logic Games have been flip-flopping between obscenely difficult (think Zones) and remarkably easy over the past few LSATs.

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Slay the LSAT Monsters: Reading Comp, Logic Games, LRs

Halloween’s just around the corner, and the scariest thing this year isn’t witches, Satanists, or your sister’s barely-there nurse costume. Rather, Halloween starts the 1-month countdown to the December LSAT.

By now, you should be pretty far along in your studies. You should also have a nemesis in the form of one of the sections. Van Helsing had his Dracula. William Stoughton had his witches. Dr. Frankenstein had Frankenstein’s monster (probably should have seen that one coming).

Each section can be terrifying in its own right. However, each section has its own silver bullet – a strategy to destroy it in one fell blow.

But where can you find these amazing, anti-monster strategies?