Tag Archive: lsat practice exam

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Making the Most of Your LSAT Practice Tests

As we come down to the wire here, practice tests are increasingly important as an LSAT practice tool. They’re hugely useful for replicating the experience of a real test, and for exposing you to more and more questions.

But a practice test is perhaps most useful for helping you identify what you don’t know – and if you aren’t testing with that in mind, then you’re far from optimizing those PTs. How can you make sure you’re getting the most out of those grueling hours? By focusing on your errors.

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Why Aren’t My Practice Test Scores Improving?

Hey, you baseball players out there – remember a year or two after tee-ball when your coach took you aside and told you that what you thought of as your graceful Hammer-of-Thor swing was, in fact, rubbish? And then you had to completely reconstruct your approach? Well, the process of studying for the LSAT is a little like that – here’s how.

The LSAT is a skills-based test with no prior knowledge required. This means that when you take your first diagnostic test, you’re naturally going to be coming up with strategies and methods and heuristics on the fly. This is great in the fight-or-flight circumstance that is that diagnostic test, but when you think about it, it’s obvious that the approach you conjure up under pressure is unlikely to be perfectly aligned with the most efficient and effective methods.

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Diving Back Into June LSAT Prep After Memorial Day Weekend

How was that long weekend? Relaxing? Did you fire up a grill? How does it feel if I tell you that Memorial Day also marked two weeks to go before the June LSAT?

Not so great, you say?

It’s time to get back to studying. If you took some time off over the weekend, that isn’t necessarily fatal. It can even be good to get your mind off the LSAT for a little bit. Now your task is to make the most of these next two weeks.

If you didn’t take one over the weekend, start with a full LSAT practice test. Then, review it. When you’re done with that, review some more. It’s easy to succumb to the temptation to take LSAT practice test after LSAT practice test in hopes that your score will climb.

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The Role of Luck on the LSAT (and How to Prepare for it)

Today, all across the US and Canada (this is an LSAT blog, after all), many people of Irish heritage and not-one-bit-Irish heritage alike will celebrate St. Patrick by wearing green, drinking things that are green but aren’t normally supposed to be (If I must drink something green, make it a Chartreuse and soda), and generally carousing about town getting utterly plastered.

Nonetheless, it makes for a good excuse to discuss the role of luck in the LSAT. For the most part, the LSAT is a predictable test. Practice tests will generally give you a good gauge of where you stand. But at the margins, chance can play a role on LSAT test day. Here are some ways it can factor in.

How Luck Plays a Role on the LSAT I: The experimental section

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How Learning the Piano is Like Learning the LSAT

As an LSAT instructor, I’ve come across students with a wide variety of interests and backgrounds. I’ve taught college football players, chemistry PhDs, and trapeze artists. One way I try to personalize the experience for them is to relate the LSAT to something from their own lives. Given the diversity of my students, this has sometimes proven challenging (except with the trapeze artist, obviously).

Today, though, I thought I’d compare the LSAT to something from my own life that I know and love well: the piano.

I have played the piano for 22 years, which is almost as long as the modern LSAT’s existence. Put another way: my piano playing is older than Miley Cyrus (which might explain why I prefer my music to hers).

The following are a few parallels that can be drawn between learning the piano and mastering the LSAT:

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Omaha! Omaha! How to LSAT Prep on Super Bowl Sunday

As usual, the February LSAT is coming a week after the Super Bowl. That’s a problem if you’re in the midst of LSAT prep and you had any designs on watching the big game. It’s hard to justify taking a day entirely off of studying this close to the LSAT, but then again, it’s the Super Bowl.

The answer is to compromise. Luckily for you, even if you’re on the west coast, kickoff isn’t until 3:30. You know you’re not going to actually get any studying done after the game, so get your full day of studying in beforehand. Wake up at a reasonable hour, even though it’s Sunday, and get to work. Take an LSAT practice test. Review it. Drill some of your weak areas.

Once you get that done, you can devote the rest of the day to enjoying the Super Bowl however you like to enjoy it. Eat some junk food. If you want to drink some beer, drink a little beer. Forget about the LSAT.

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Drawing LSAT Prep Inspiration From Classic Christmas Tunes

You probably don’t know that when I’m not teaching LSAT prep, I’m a freelance musician. Which means that my last few weeks have been full of corporate holiday parties, not-so-corporate holiday affairs, and, well, you get the idea. And lots of Christmas music. And the LSAT.

So I thought it might be nice to draw lessons for LSAT prep over the next week from Christmas songs. Expect strained analogies to follow.

“The Christmas Song” is often associated with Nat King Cole, but it was written by Mel Tormé (like many of the composers of Christmas songs, he was Jewish). The song’s opening reference to chestnuts roasting on an open fire has a lesson for those studying the LSAT. Roasting chestnuts require care and attention. If you get distracted for too long, you’ll end up with burnt chestnuts.

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Make the Most of Your Final Days Before the December LSAT

It’s December 3, your Thanksgiving food coma has barely worn off, and you’re staring at the December LSAT coming up this Saturday. It’s your last week of LSAT prep before the December LSAT, so it’s important that you make the most of it.

By now, you should have finished covering all the kinds of questions you’ll see on the LSAT. Whether it’s your first time taking the real thing, or you’re an LSAT veteran, you should devote this week to timed practice: full LSAT practice tests and full timed sections. Of course, review them carefully. And if anything comes up that you need to review, do a little extra practice.

But don’t overdo it. If you’re a sleep-deprived wreck on December LSAT test day, you’ll erase any benefit you might have gained from studying like crazy this week.

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LSAT Prep Tips for Thanksgiving (and Thanksgivukkah) Break

Today marks both Thanksgiving eve and the beginning of Hanukkah. Not only is this a momentous and rare occurrence, it also ensures that any member of the Jewish faith will add at least an inch to his/her waistline before the beginning of December. While this all sounds wonderful in theory, it’s an eight-day stretch fraught with peril for the Jewish LSAT student, let alone those who have only Thanksgiving (and annoying relatives, and possibly final exams) to deal with.

It would take an LSAT student of extraordinary discipline to resist the delights of the season. The food and beverage bonanza that is Thanksgiving can scarcely be ignored, and it ought to be enjoyed. Just take care not to over-enjoy.

I took the December LSAT in my time and I can remember studying over the Thanksgiving holiday.

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5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day

Hank, our LSAT blog editor-at-large, gave me the topic of “5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day.” There’s no way I’m giving him a pass and coming up with something that isn’t as cheesy (plus, who doesn’t love cheesy? My holiday-themed movie marathon includes It’s a Wonderful Life, so clearly not this guy), so I present to you…

5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day

Key #1 to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day: Anger, fear, aggression. The LSAT are they.

You’ll be going through a range of emotions over the next week and a half. In fact, you’ll probably go through the entire range of emotions over the next week and a half.