Tag Archive: lsat practice exam

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Danger: Too Many LSAT Practice Exams Can Bog You Down

Because the LSAT is a timed, 4-hour test, it’s widely believed that the best way to study for the LSAT must be to take as many full, timed LSAT practice exams as possible. However, that’s like saying the best way to train for a marathon is to run a bunch of marathons.

LSAT practice tests are important, but you can overdo it. Taking LSAT practice test after LSAT practice test in the hopes that your LSAT score will go up through brute force is a futile endeavor. Here’s how to escape the futility:

First of all, save timed LSAT practice exams until later in the process. They’re much more useful and informative once you’ve studied everything that’s going to be on them.

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1 Month Until the December LSAT: Practice LSAT Scores OK?

The December LSAT is coming up in exactly one month. Seriously, look at a calendar. If that thought makes you panic, look at it this way: you still have a full month to go before the December LSAT.

Many Blueprint LSAT Prep students have recently taken their second LSAT practice test. You may be wondering how much that test says about how well you’ll perform on the LSAT in a month. The perhaps surprising answer is that it doesn’t say very much at all.

I’ve had plenty of students whose LSAT score stayed the same or even dropped a little on the second LSAT practice test, and who then went on to see very large gains. I’ve also had students whose LSAT score has shot up right away. Either way is fine. If you’re not happy with your LSAT score on the second LSAT practice exam, there’s no reason to worry.

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Daylight Savings: An Extra Hour For December LSAT Prep

Early in the morning this upcoming Sunday, daylight savings time will end (unless you live in Arizona, of course). Right at the instant that clocks would have switched over from 1:59:59 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., they’ll click right back to 1:00 a.m. This has the strange effect that there will be two times an hour apart that are both called 1:30 AM.

If you’re preparing for the December LSAT, this means you have one more hour than you thought before LSAT test day. It’s time to think about how you’ll use it.

In California at least, you definitely don’t get an extra hour to drink. Even though closing time is 2 a.m., and 1 a.m. is generally considered to be before 2 a.m., state law is explicit on the subject: on daylight savings night, sale of alcoholic beverages must cease two hours after midnight, regardless of what the clock may say.

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Tales From the LSAT Crypt II: Dreaded Experimental Sections

Halloween is finally here, which means you can enliven your LSAT studies by wearing your costume to the library while you’re studying tonight. Since you’ve got the LSAT on the brain, perhaps you’ll dress as a mauve dinosaur or Thurgood Marshall (although, in light of recent news regarding celebrities’ ill-advised Halloween costumes, this might be a good moment for a little reminder).

However, if you want to dress up as something that will really strike fear into the heart of anyone else studying for the LSAT, allow me to suggest dressing as another common LSAT bogeyman (other than LSAT Logic Games): the dreaded experimental section (dun dun dun!).*

Tales from the LSAT Crypt II: The order and type of the experimental section

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Friday the 13th: Putting the ‘Dead’ in LSAT Deadline Weekend

As if Friday the 13th weren’t frightening enough, today is also the final deadline to register for the October LSAT. If you’re planning to take the October LSAT and for some reason you haven’t registered yet, now is the time. Seriously, right now. You’ll have to pay the LSAC an extra $70 for registering late, but after today there’s no way to get signed up.

Today is also the last day to change your LSAT testing center or date for a fee of $83 by mail, phone or fax. If you’re doing so online, you have until Sunday, Sept. 15. Check out yesterday’s LSAT blog post for some advice on whether to take advantage of this opportunity.

If you’re still on board for the October LSAT, it’s getting real.

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3 Tips to Stay Sane as We Close In On the October LSAT

The October LSAT is in 30 days. Four weeks plus two days. However you look at it, the October LSAT is sneaking up fast.

If you’re studying for the LSAT, that thought probably doesn’t comfort you right now. You might feel like you have to spend every waking hour between now and the fifth of October thinking about the LSAT.

You might even feel like the LSAT is starting to make you go a little crazy. Don’t let it. Even though you have a lot of work to do in the next four weeks, it’s important that you figure out how to stay sane and avoid burning out. Here are some suggestions:

How to Stay Sane Before the October LSAT I: Take a day away from LSAT prep

You may feel like you can’t afford to take a day off, but the gains to your mental health will more than make up for any time lost.

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Make Sure You’re Taking Advantage of All LSAC Has to Offer

If you ask my students (and I often do), the LSAC is an evil organization meant to keep you from going to the law school of your choice, take your money, and probably kick you in the groin a few times. The more melodramatic ones suggest that they barter in stolen souls.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Well, I guess the soul thing could be true; I don’t know what currency they accept at the company store.

In reality, the LSAC is a business with two sets of clients. The first set is you, the pre-law student. They’re trying to sell you products to help you in the law school application process. The second set is the law schools, which use the LSAC to screen candidates.

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How LSAT Prep is Like an NFL Training Camp

It’s almost August, which means two things: NFL teams have reported to training camp, and Blueprint’s LSAT prep classes for the October LSAT are underway. Even though you don’t need to show up to your first LSAT class in game shape, and you won’t ever be penalized $2 million for failing to show up to “optional” LSAT team workouts, there are some parallels between the two.

How LSAT Prep is Like an NFL Training Camp I: You have to learn the playbook

NFL offenses have notoriously large playbooks. Memorizing their contents is no easy task for the players. But it’s an important one: if you don’t know the plays, you’ll have trouble staying on the field. Studying for the LSAT doesn’t involve nearly as much memorization, fortunately for you. But think of it as building a playbook.

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What the NBA Finals Have Taught Us About LSAT Prep

Tonight, the Miami Heat and the San Antonio Spurs will go at it in game seven of the NBA finals. The entire season has come down to this. Should the Heat win, South Beach will go crazy, but I think the basketball result will be more of an excuse for the celebration than its underlying cause. And if the Spurs emerge victorious, will revelers, uh, throng the River Walk?

LSAT studiers who are basketball fans have it easy: the June LSAT is over and done with, and the October LSAT is still far away. You can watch the NBA finals without any tinge of guilt.

Although the LSAC will never ask you to shoot free throws (probably), there are lessons you can take from this year’s NBA finals if you’re studying for the LSAT. Here are some parallels:

It takes a strong rotation throughout to succeed.

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What Your Weekend Before the June LSAT Should Look Like

So this is it. It’s the Friday before the LSAT.

If you were taking, say, the October LSAT, you’d be mentally preparing to kick some LSAT butt tomorrow morning. But since this is June, you’ve got a whole, empty, interminable weekend stretching out ahead of you. What are you going to do with all that time?

You should take your final pre-LSAT practice test no later than Saturday. That means you’ll spend Saturday either taking your practice LSAT test and reviewing it, or (if you already took the practice test) perhaps fine-tuning a few weaknesses. That should keep you busy, and keeping busy is good.

But that leaves Sunday, an entire day on which you will be doing no studying. That’s right – no studying at all.