Tag Archive: lsat practice

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Make the Most of Your Final Days Before the December LSAT

It’s December 3, your Thanksgiving food coma has barely worn off, and you’re staring at the December LSAT coming up this Saturday. It’s your last week of LSAT prep before the December LSAT, so it’s important that you make the most of it.

By now, you should have finished covering all the kinds of questions you’ll see on the LSAT. Whether it’s your first time taking the real thing, or you’re an LSAT veteran, you should devote this week to timed practice: full LSAT practice tests and full timed sections. Of course, review them carefully. And if anything comes up that you need to review, do a little extra practice.

But don’t overdo it. If you’re a sleep-deprived wreck on December LSAT test day, you’ll erase any benefit you might have gained from studying like crazy this week.

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LSAT Prep Tips for Thanksgiving (and Thanksgivukkah) Break

Today marks both Thanksgiving eve and the beginning of Hanukkah. Not only is this a momentous and rare occurrence, it also ensures that any member of the Jewish faith will add at least an inch to his/her waistline before the beginning of December. While this all sounds wonderful in theory, it’s an eight-day stretch fraught with peril for the Jewish LSAT student, let alone those who have only Thanksgiving (and annoying relatives, and possibly final exams) to deal with.

It would take an LSAT student of extraordinary discipline to resist the delights of the season. The food and beverage bonanza that is Thanksgiving can scarcely be ignored, and it ought to be enjoyed. Just take care not to over-enjoy.

I took the December LSAT in my time and I can remember studying over the Thanksgiving holiday.

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5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day

Hank, our LSAT blog editor-at-large, gave me the topic of “5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day.” There’s no way I’m giving him a pass and coming up with something that isn’t as cheesy (plus, who doesn’t love cheesy? My holiday-themed movie marathon includes It’s a Wonderful Life, so clearly not this guy), so I present to you…

5 Keys to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day

Key #1 to Not Being a Turkey on December LSAT Test Day: Anger, fear, aggression. The LSAT are they.

You’ll be going through a range of emotions over the next week and a half. In fact, you’ll probably go through the entire range of emotions over the next week and a half.

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Danger: Too Many LSAT Practice Exams Can Bog You Down

Because the LSAT is a timed, 4-hour test, it’s widely believed that the best way to study for the LSAT must be to take as many full, timed LSAT practice exams as possible. However, that’s like saying the best way to train for a marathon is to run a bunch of marathons.

LSAT practice tests are important, but you can overdo it. Taking LSAT practice test after LSAT practice test in the hopes that your LSAT score will go up through brute force is a futile endeavor. Here’s how to escape the futility:

First of all, save timed LSAT practice exams until later in the process. They’re much more useful and informative once you’ve studied everything that’s going to be on them.

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1 Month Until the December LSAT: Practice LSAT Scores OK?

The December LSAT is coming up in exactly one month. Seriously, look at a calendar. If that thought makes you panic, look at it this way: you still have a full month to go before the December LSAT.

Many Blueprint LSAT Prep students have recently taken their second LSAT practice test. You may be wondering how much that test says about how well you’ll perform on the LSAT in a month. The perhaps surprising answer is that it doesn’t say very much at all.

I’ve had plenty of students whose LSAT score stayed the same or even dropped a little on the second LSAT practice test, and who then went on to see very large gains. I’ve also had students whose LSAT score has shot up right away. Either way is fine. If you’re not happy with your LSAT score on the second LSAT practice exam, there’s no reason to worry.

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Daylight Savings: An Extra Hour For December LSAT Prep

Early in the morning this upcoming Sunday, daylight savings time will end (unless you live in Arizona, of course). Right at the instant that clocks would have switched over from 1:59:59 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., they’ll click right back to 1:00 a.m. This has the strange effect that there will be two times an hour apart that are both called 1:30 AM.

If you’re preparing for the December LSAT, this means you have one more hour than you thought before LSAT test day. It’s time to think about how you’ll use it.

In California at least, you definitely don’t get an extra hour to drink. Even though closing time is 2 a.m., and 1 a.m. is generally considered to be before 2 a.m., state law is explicit on the subject: on daylight savings night, sale of alcoholic beverages must cease two hours after midnight, regardless of what the clock may say.

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Tales From the LSAT Crypt II: Dreaded Experimental Sections

Halloween is finally here, which means you can enliven your LSAT studies by wearing your costume to the library while you’re studying tonight. Since you’ve got the LSAT on the brain, perhaps you’ll dress as a mauve dinosaur or Thurgood Marshall (although, in light of recent news regarding celebrities’ ill-advised Halloween costumes, this might be a good moment for a little reminder).

However, if you want to dress up as something that will really strike fear into the heart of anyone else studying for the LSAT, allow me to suggest dressing as another common LSAT bogeyman (other than LSAT Logic Games): the dreaded experimental section (dun dun dun!).*

Tales from the LSAT Crypt II: The order and type of the experimental section

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Changing Seasons: December LSAT Prep is Underway

The October LSAT has just barely come and gone. Today is the deadline to cancel your LSAT score, and those who choose to keep their October LSAT scores won’t see them released for another few weeks.

But don’t let that hide that the December LSAT is fast approaching; if you’re not too happy with how the October LSAT went, or if you decided at the last minute not to take the October LSAT, you get a chance for a do-over in less than two months.

That’s right: two months.

There’s little time to dawdle if you’re thinking of taking the December LSAT. If you took the October LSAT, give yourself a little break. Take a week to get the LSAT off your mind.

Then, get back to studying.

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Friday the 13th: Putting the ‘Dead’ in LSAT Deadline Weekend

As if Friday the 13th weren’t frightening enough, today is also the final deadline to register for the October LSAT. If you’re planning to take the October LSAT and for some reason you haven’t registered yet, now is the time. Seriously, right now. You’ll have to pay the LSAC an extra $70 for registering late, but after today there’s no way to get signed up.

Today is also the last day to change your LSAT testing center or date for a fee of $83 by mail, phone or fax. If you’re doing so online, you have until Sunday, Sept. 15. Check out yesterday’s LSAT blog post for some advice on whether to take advantage of this opportunity.

If you’re still on board for the October LSAT, it’s getting real.

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In or Out?: October LSAT Early Withdraw Deadline Tomorrow

Tomorrow is your last chance to get a partial refund for your October LSAT registration. If you haven’t done any LSAT prep yet, then you should probably withdraw your registration or change your LSAT test date.

If you have been studying for the past month, then you might not like your current practice LSAT score, but at this point few people do. You’ll see your best practice LSAT score sometime in the last week before the October LSAT. So, don’t rush to withdraw your LSAT registration just because you’re not hitting your ideal score yet.

It’s very common to feel overwhelmed and insecure at this point in your LSAT prep. The LSAT is tough, and there are a lot of concepts to learn. But right now you deserve to be happy with yourself if you’ve been studying hard.