Tag Archive: LSAT preparation

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This Dog Is Studying for the LSAT. Are You?

Some of our classes met for this first time over the weekend – but fear not, because if you’d like to join these classes, there’s still time. You’ll need to catch up on the first practice test on your own (no biggie). More importantly, you’ll need to enroll ASAP so you can get cracking.

Classes that started this weekend include:

Irvine – July 11
Manhattan 1 – July 12
Manhattan 2 – July 12
Miami – July 12
Berkeley – July 12
Los Angeles – Westwood – July 12

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Is Private LSAT Tutoring Worth It?

There are many ways to study for the LSAT. There are in-person classes, online courses, self-study guides, videos, message boards, and so on. All of these methods have their pros and cons, of course, and there’s no one size that fits all. One approach students ask about all the time is one-on-one tutoring. They want to know: Is it worth it? My unsatisfying answer: Sometimes.

As compared to an LSAT class, private tutoring has a few advantages. First, it’s customized, letting the student go at his or her ideal pace. In a classroom, teachers “teach to the middle”: They gear the difficulty to the average student, inevitably leaving some students feeling a little bored and others a little stretched. A private tutor can work with you at your pace.

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Logical Reasonings / 7.9.15

A) Here’s something that may come in handy for LSAT and law students alike: Taco Bell is starting a delivery service. Yahoo

B) In a triumph for grammar sticklers everywhere, an Ohio woman got out of a parking ticket because of a missing ticket in the relevant ordinance. Washington Post

C) Reading Plato’s allegory of the cave in a freshman year gen ed class may serve more of a purpose than just being a convenient metaphor for college – Irving Howe defends why you should absolutely read the canon in college. New Republic

D) The first of Blueprint LSAT Prep’s courses for the October 2015 LSAT are starting this weekend! Check ’em out. Blueprint LSAT Prep

E) It’s Krispy Kreme’s birthday tomorrow, and if you buy a dozen donuts, you can get an additional dozen for 78 cents. Diabetes medication not included. Woman Freebies

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Have You Signed Up for Your LSAT Class?

It’s getting to be that time to think about weekend plans – perhaps a trip to the beach or a game of softball with friends? Or, hey, how about starting an LSAT class?

The first of Blueprint LSAT Prep’s summer classes are getting underway this weekend, and there’s still time to enroll in classes starting in your area! Check out the list of classes starting this weekend below; you can also find a complete list of classes on our website.

Irvine – July 11
Manhattan 1 – July 12
Manhattan 2 – July 12
Miami – July 12
Berkeley – July 12

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October LSAT Classes Starting Soon

Ah, summer – the beach, barbecues, baseball, and a big ol’ stack of Blueprint LSAT Prep books. That’s right – although it may feel like summer will last forever, it’s almost that time of year again, and Blueprint LSAT Prep’s classes for the October LSAT are starting soon. Here’s a partial list of classes starting within the next week; you can also find the complete list of upcoming classes on our website.

Irvine – July 11
Manhattan 1 – July 12
Manhattan 2 – July 12
Miami – July 12
Berkeley – July 12
Los Angeles – Westwood – July 12

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How the LSAT is Like the World Cup

The U.S. Women’s National Team found a perfect way to celebrate America’s birthday – by crushing Japan to win the World Cup for the first time in 16 years. In honor of the team’s accomplishment, here are a few ways in which the LSAT is like the World Cup.

1.) There’s a lot of competition

When you take the LSAT, you don’t have to compete against anyone else, but you do have to compete with yourself. The test-preparation process is a grind; it gets boring and unpleasant pretty quickly. When I prepared for the LSAT, I would constantly try to one-up myself – I would try to complete every practice set and every practice exam more quickly and accurately than the last. The more I practiced, the better I got, and the more intense my “competition” became. Consequently, my preparation technique was analogous to the increasingly difficult rounds in the World Cup tournament. Obviously, this style of preparation isn’t for everyone, but it is one way of trying to make the process more bearable.

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Tips to Improve Your LSAT Study Habits (and LSAT Score)

LSAT prep season is getting in full swing. This winter, per usual, was a quiet time in the pre-law world; few people sit for the February LSAT, and there’s a lull of activity in the early months of the year. But after a busier spring of June LSAT prep, even more people are gearing up for the October. So what should you do if you’re planning on taking the test in a few months? Well, this may sound obvious, but you should study. You should study frequently, you should study well, you should study regularly. You should study.

LSAT Study Tip I: Do the work

For those of you taking an LSAT prep course, whether online or in-person, it’s not enough to just do the lessons.

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Three Frequent LSAT Prep Struggles

LSAT prep might feel like a fresh new form of torture to you, but the truth is that students have been slaving under LSAC overlords for years upon years. It just so happens that I’ve also been teaching the LSAT for a few years myself. And while each and every student I’ve taught is a special and unique snowflake, over time I’ve noticed a few trends in terms of the questions students ask most often. Now you, dear reader, can be the beneficiary of my years of accumulated wisdom. Behold, some of the most common issues faced by people studying for the LSAT:

Timing
Timing is a delicate balance – you want to increase your speed, of course, but not at the expense of accuracy. We’ve actually run a great series of posts on increasing your speed: check out some general tips on improving speed, a delightful post chock full of tips for Reading Comprehension, and even more tips on Logic Games. All three posts are worth reading, so go ahead – take a gander right now. Really; I’ll wait.

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In It Together: Advice on Studying for the LSAT With a Partner

Misery loves company, as they say, so if you have a friend who is also studying for the LSAT you’ve probably already discovered the joys of commiserating about the devious questions created for you by LSAC.

That’s all well and good, but perhaps you and your friend have decided to take your relationship to the next level. Perhaps you’re ready to take the leap and start – yep, you guessed it – studying together.

First of all, you’ll want to find a quiet location. Light some candles. Put on some mood music and open a bottle of wine – wait, scratch that last part. In all seriousness, even though studying with a friend might involve more talking than your normal studying, you’ll still want to find a relatively quiet place to work. You’ll likely be spending a fair amount of time working on questions independently, so it’s important that you’re able to concentrate.

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Shifting Into Retake Mode

So your June LSAT score came out. It didn’t knock your socks off. You’ve evaluated your options and decided that you’re going to retake the LSAT. What now?

In the days before the June LSAT, you were probably doing lots of practice tests and timed practice. Now, it’s time to slow down. Review everything. Focus in on your weaker areas, and try to turn them into things you confidently understand. Don’t worry about your speed just yet; it’s time to really focus on your mastery of the LSAT’s underlying logic.

Reviewing questions you’ve done is always important, but it’s especially important for you now. Everything you do, you need to review. Every time you miss a question or get one right by lucky guess, try to pick that question apart until you feel like you could explain it to someone else.