Tag Archive: lsat reading comprehension

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What Your Weekend Before the June LSAT Should Look Like

So this is it. It’s the Friday before the LSAT.

If you were taking, say, the October LSAT, you’d be mentally preparing to kick some LSAT butt tomorrow morning. But since this is June, you’ve got a whole, empty, interminable weekend stretching out ahead of you. What are you going to do with all that time?

You should take your final pre-LSAT practice test no later than Saturday. That means you’ll spend Saturday either taking your practice LSAT test and reviewing it, or (if you already took the practice test) perhaps fine-tuning a few weaknesses. That should keep you busy, and keeping busy is good.

But that leaves Sunday, an entire day on which you will be doing no studying. That’s right – no studying at all.

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Tips to Make LSAT Reading Comp Not Feel Like Pulling Teeth

When given a choice between doing an LSAT Reading Comp section and getting a root canal, many LSAT-takers would opt for the dental work without hesitation.

This notorious section can be dense, dull and difficult, and as the June LSAT approaches, you may find yourself frustrated because your Reading Comp scores refuse to budge. Fear not. Just as with the rest of the LSAT, practice makes perfect, and with these tips you’ll find yourself inching ever closer to your goal score. And all without novocain!

Tip #1 for LSAT Reading Comprehension Domination: Change how you look at LSAT Reading Comp

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Matt Shinners’s 2013 February LSAT Predictions

UPDATE: LSAC has closed some February LSAT testing centers in the northeast due to an approaching blizzard. Check this LSAT blog post for more.

Making predictions for the February LSAT is a liberating experience. As the only unreleased LSAT of the year, I can say pretty much anything without fear of being proven wrong.

Plus, I can’t get it as wrong as those Mayans, amirite?

2013 February LSAT Prediction I: Logic Games

Logic Games have been flip-flopping between obscenely difficult (think Zones) and remarkably easy over the past few LSATs.

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5 Websites that Will Help You on LSAT Reading Comp

Success on LSAT Reading Comprehension depends a great deal on one’s reading ability (I know, you don’t need to be a prophet to arrive at this stunning revelation). But how do you become a “better” reader? You presumably mastered reading in middle school, so it may seem that by the time you reach adulthood your reading skills are as good as they’re going to get.

The truth of the matter, however, is that you can significantly improve your reading speed and comprehension by simply reading more. People who regularly read books and articles will not only read faster, but also have better retention of what they read. This is because ample reading literally improves your short-term memory, allowing you to retain content more accurately and for a longer period of time.

So if you are having trouble finishing LSAT Reading Comp passages in a timely manner, you know what you have to do—read more!

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LSAT Reading Comp Book Club V: Wrap-Up

Dan McCarthy is a veteran Blueprint LSAT Prep instructor. This is his final post in a series on improving one’s reading skills for the LSAT reading comprehension section.

We have finally reached the end of the first edition of the LSAT Reading Comp Book Club. My motivation in writing these posts has been to provide an answer to one of the most common questions my students ask me: What can I read to get additional practice for LSAT reading comprehension? If you’ve been reading these posts faithfully, you now have three solid starting points.

If you haven’t been reading them faithfully (tisk tisk), here’s your chance to catch up:

LSAT Reading Comp Book Club I: The Introduction

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LSAT Reading Comp Book Club IV: Books About Law

The focus for today’s LSAT Reading Comp Book Club is law. Each LSAT typically includes one passage on a law-related subject, and if you’re taking the LSAT, I’d hope you’re interested in the subject. Instead of talking about just one book, I’m going to give you three different works to consider this week.

My first two recommendations are non-fiction stories about how the law actually works. These stories are meant to be entertaining, but also realistic. Sort of like The Devil’s Advocate, except that the Al Pacino character isn’t literally the devil. Actually, there’s no Al Pacino character at all. If you’re reading a book about law and you realize that someone is saying something that sounds like an Al Pacino speech, that’s not what we’re going for here.

First up is A Civil Action by Jonathan Harr.

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LSAT Reading Comprehension Book Club II: 1491

This post is the first in a series of reviews of books by veteran Blueprint instructor Dan McCarthy that may help you improve your LSAT reading comprehension skills.

In my LSAT Reading Comprehension Book Club introduction last week, I said that now is a great time to work on your LSAT reading comprehension skills. Today, I’ll give you a concrete suggestion of a book that can help you develop those skills.

That book is 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles Mann. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book more perfectly designed to help you improve your LSAT reading comprehension skills. In some ways, the book is almost like a 400-page LSAT reading comprehension passage.