Tag Archive: lsat score

/ / / /

Logical Reasonings / 11.2.15

A. Notable law school representatives have responded to the New York Times article that harshly criticized graduates’ job prospects. New York Times

B. Deciding if your LSAT score is too low. U.S. News

C. Taylor Swift is hit with a copyright infringement lawsuit. Will she “shake it off?” CNN

D. A recent study shows that nearly half of college students are afraid to speak up when their peers disagree with them. Chicago Tribune

E. The cutest Stromtrooper we have ever seen. Mashable

/ / /

To Retake the LSAT or Not Retake the LSAT?

With October LSAT scores out this week, I’m sure many of you are either kicking back with a well-deserved beer or else grinding away wrapping up your applications. Here, however, I’d like to address those among us with a less than happy outcome

/ / / / / /

Lessons Learned From the October 2015 LSAT

October LSAT scores came out last week. That means the October LSAT was released into the wild. I was perhaps a little bit too excited to sit down with a timer and take it — it had been a little while since I last took a full test timed. Here’s my overall impression.

/ / / /

Logical Reasonings / 7.23.15

A) Do you want a FREE copy of The Blueprint for LSAT Logic Games? Of course you do. Get it while it’s hot. Blueprint LSAT Prep

B) We’ve got a laundry list of live LSAT classes starting in the next week, and you could be in one of them. Blueprint LSAT Prep

C) Surprise! It turns out that your chances of getting into a higher-ranked law school are better if you have a higher LSAT score. U.S. News

D) The verdict is in: Not only are butt dials awkward and potentially embarrassing, but you don’t have a reasonable expectation of privacy for them. Bloomberg

E) Here’s a movement both parties can get behind: Obama issuing an executive order to keep Jon Stewart from leaving the show. Newsweek

/ / / / / / / /

Tips to Improve Your LSAT Study Habits (and LSAT Score)

LSAT prep season is getting in full swing. This winter, per usual, was a quiet time in the pre-law world; few people sit for the February LSAT, and there’s a lull of activity in the early months of the year. But after a busier spring of June LSAT prep, even more people are gearing up for the October. So what should you do if you’re planning on taking the test in a few months? Well, this may sound obvious, but you should study. You should study frequently, you should study well, you should study regularly. You should study.

LSAT Study Tip I: Do the work

For those of you taking an LSAT prep course, whether online or in-person, it’s not enough to just do the lessons.

/ / /

Celebrate Earth Day With This Organic LSAT Logic Game

Happy belated Earth Day! The Earth might be doomed, but you can still save your LSAT score.

We may be a day late and a dollar short, but in honor of the Earth Day yesterday, MSS is happy to bring you an organic, locally sourced, and reusable LSAT Logic Game! Give it a try, and think of it as penance for your high carbon lifestyle.


Three recycling centers, A, B, and C, will each recycle at least one type of material: P, Q, R, and S. The assignment of materials to centers will adhere to the following rules:

/ / / / / / / /

LSAT Instructor: What I Learned in Law School Admissions

Yuko Sin is an instructor and blogger for Blueprint LSAT Prep. He is starting at Columbia Law School this fall, and will be writing a series of law school-related posts about his experiences. Here’s part one and part two.

After sending out applications to 15 law schools, I would like to share with you what I’ve learned about law school admissions.

But first, a disclaimer:

First, I’m extremely happy with and feel fortunate about my admissions outcomes. Second, these are just my own takeaways; your experiences or opinions might vary.

Lesson #1: You can get waitlisted/rejected even with great numbers.

/ / / / / / / /

Law School Application Season Opens Soon: Are You Ready?

As July comes to a close, we are still a couple months away from law schools opening up the application season. Despite this, potential applicants should start working on their materials now in order to put themselves in the best position to succeed in the coming cycle. This post will specifically address two groups of applicants—first, students who took the June LSAT and are satisfied with their scores and, second, students who are planning on taking the September LSAT.

For both groups, if you haven’t done so already, sign up for the Credential Assembly Service offered through LSAC. Then, begin collecting letters of recommendation and requesting transcripts. Letters of recommendation are, obviously, contingent on recommenders and, as such, they are outside of the applicant’s control. Thus, requesting these letters early on will help make sure that there are no uncontrollable delays in your application.

/ / / / / /

How to Make the Most of Your LSAT Prep Homework Time

If you’re just starting your September LSAT prep, you’re already learning the joys of Logic Games, sufficiency and necessity. Unfortunately, just showing up for class is not sufficient for a good LSAT score. You’ll also need to do your homework, and you’ll need to do it the right way.

The point of LSAT homework is not just to get it done as quickly as possible. If you’re halfheartedly doing your homework with one eye on a rerun of Scrubs, you might as well not be doing it at all. Instead, the goal of LSAT homework is to make sure you fully understand the concepts you’re covering.

That means that you should take as much time as you need per question. Seriously, don’t mark an answer until you’re fully confident in your choice. This early in your prep, there’s no rush.