Tag Archive: LSAT Study

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Balancing Studying for the LSAT with School

The October LSAT about six weeks away. You’ve mastered ordering games and are a pro at linking conditionals. But you’re still trying to get your head around all of the flaw categories and your timing is way off. You’re thinking it’s time to ramp up your study schedule. But there’s also this other item looming on your calendar: school.

Your senior year of college is about to start, and you have a lot of to-dos. You have to get the mini-fridge out of storage, which is a total hassle because Gary will say you can borrow his car but then he’ll totally flake on you all Sunday, and you’ll be like, “What the heck, Gary, my brews are only getting warmer over here.” Then you’ll have to decide whether you’re going to stick with the top-bun you’ve been rocking over the summer. Sure, Gary will give you flak about it, but what does Gary know about style? The guy wears Gap jeans.

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Tips to Improve Your LSAT Study Habits (and LSAT Score)

LSAT prep season is getting in full swing. This winter, per usual, was a quiet time in the pre-law world; few people sit for the February LSAT, and there’s a lull of activity in the early months of the year. But after a busier spring of June LSAT prep, even more people are gearing up for the October. So what should you do if you’re planning on taking the test in a few months? Well, this may sound obvious, but you should study. You should study frequently, you should study well, you should study regularly. You should study.

LSAT Study Tip I: Do the work

For those of you taking an LSAT prep course, whether online or in-person, it’s not enough to just do the lessons.

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Balancing the LSAT and a Busy Life

A Blueprint LSAT blog reader writes: ‘It would be helpful to have some tips and guidance in balancing the course workload with full time work. It is not easy keeping up with the homework while working and attending class.’

I’ve had a few thousand other students find themselves in similar situations. It really isn’t easy to balance life and LSAT prep, but here are some tips to help you along.

Tip 1 For Busy LSAT Students: Do a bit of everything.

If you can’t do all of your LSAT prep homework, try to do a bit from each section and at each difficulty. Don’t skip an entire section – that means do your Reading Comp homework!

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Why the ABA’s Latest LSAT Proposal is a Bad Idea

The ABA might make it easier for certain applicants to get into law school without taking the LSAT.

Currently, you don’t really need to take the LSAT to get into law school. A law school can admit an applicant using some other admissions test, but it has to get permission first or pay a fine later. This alternative admissions procedure is rarely used, which is probably why you haven’t heard of it.

The ABA is thinking about implementing the following changes to its LSAT requirement:

Up to 10% of a law school’s class may be admitted without an LSAT score.

You can qualify for admissions without an LSAT if, (1) you are an undergraduate looking to apply to your alma mater’s law school, or (2) you want to get some sort of joint degree like a JD-MBA.

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Four LSAT Prep Study Tips for MLK Day Weekend

With Martin Luther King, Jr. Day coming up Monday, today, for most people, is the start of a long weekend. If you’re prepping for the February LSAT (three weeks away!), you need to spend this time wisely. Here are some tips:

Long Weekend LSAT Prep Tip #1: Don’t worry about your practice LSAT scores

This is not the time to dwell on your practice LSAT scores. You are still about two weeks away from your best. I’ve seen plenty of students make double digit jumps in their practice LSAT scores during this time. So don’t freak out about not being above the median at Harvard just yet. Such worrying will only distract you from what you really should be doing: practicing.

Long Weekend LSAT Prep Tip #2: Work on your weaknesses

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The Final Countdown: December LSAT Study Plan for the Last Two Weeks

As of today, we have two weeks until the December LSAT. These are going to be the two most important weeks of your LSAT prep.

The next week should be all about working on your weaknesses. So enjoy your turkey and stuffing, but make sure you suffer from less of a food coma and more of a food nap.

If you’re struggling with the Logic Games section, you should revisit the games that gave you a hard time in the past. You’ll want to redo these games using the correct approach until you’ve got them pretty much memorized.

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How Judo Training is a Lot Like Studying for the LSAT

In my past life I did a fair amount of judo, which is a kind of wrestling sport. It is not a “martial art”. Martial means something like “appropriate for war;” judo was created as a sport from the start, but that’s a long story. Now that I work as an LSAT prep instructor I’ve realized that LSAT prep and training for judo have a ton in common.

How Judo is Like LSAT Prep I: Bad Habits are Difficult to Undo

Many people who do judo started out by learning a lot of things incorrectly. They then spend years trying to undo their awful habits, while someone who never developed these bad habits can surpass them very quickly.

The same thing happens with the LSAT.

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The Final Four Tips for Those Starting June LSAT Prep

The NCAA tournament has reached its final weekend, and you know what that means: It’s Final Four time.

It’s also time to kick your LSAT prep into high gear if you’re planning on taking the June LSAT. Also, most Blueprint LSAT Prep classes start this weekend. With that in mind, here are your final four tips for successful LSAT study.

Final Four June LSAT Prep Tip #1: Seeding isn’t destiny

This year’s Final Four features Wichita State, who entered the tourney as a 9 seed. That didn’t stop the Shockers (I know, right) from knocking off the No. 1 seed in their region, Gonzaga. (How long will it be before Gonzaga is talked about as a potential No. 1 seed again?) Syracuse and Michigan, two of the other Final Four representatives, entered as No. 4 seeds, and each also knocked off a 1 seed.

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For March Equinox, We Ask: Is Day or Night LSAT Prep Best?

The vernal equinox is upon us! For those of us who’ve forgotten what you learned in middle school Earth Science, that means it’s the first day of spring. It also means that today, and today only, will have equal parts day and night. As we go forward, you June LSAT test-takers will get more and more daylight, but the 12/12 split we get today got us to thinking about studying for the LSAT:

Is it better to prepare for the LSAT during the bright daytime hours, or under the cover of darkness?

Let’s take a look at each one’s case…

LSAT PREP IN THE DAYTIME – A bonus right off the bat with LSAT prep in the daytime is, you never have to be in search of light.

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Four New Year’s Resolutions for LSAT Retakers

Should old acquaintance be forgot, and never brought to mind? If your New Year’s Eve celebration was anything like mine, the alcohol might have taken care of that for you. Unfortunately, some of you will have to bring one acquaintance to mind in the new year – the LSAT.

With December LSAT scores coming out soon, some of you will enter the next phase of LSAT prep – gearing up for a retake. Others have already made that decision, but you’re waiting until the new year to start the studying over again. Either way, here are some resolutions to make so that you don’t enter the dreaded realm of the LSAT re-retaker.

LSAT Retaker New Year’s Resolution I: Figure out where you went wrong the first time

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, yet expecting different results.