Tag Archive: lsat test

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Revisiting the June 2014 LSAT

The day of reckoning has come. Scores for the June LSAT have dropped, right before this weekend’s Independence Day festivities. We’re not sure if that’s a good thing (“Now I can stop waiting and enjoy my 4th of July weekend in peace!”) or a bad thing (“Thanks for ruining my weekend, LSAC!”), but whatever your perspective, June scores are here to stay. Now that we can talk a little more openly about the exam, let’s give it a closer look – including You-Know-What in that games section. But first, the curve:
170 – 88
160 – 72
150 – 55

With a raw score out of 101 questions, these numbers just about match the monster curve of the December 2013 LSAT, though a 170 required a -13 instead of a -14. A generous curve is no surprise, as many students reported this test to be a tough one. Let’s take a look at the sections.

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Building the Ultimate LSAT Transformer

With the new Transformers movie coming out today, Blueprint LSAT Prep upper management tasked me with an all-important mission:

“Design a Transformer capable of battling the LSAT!”

I have to admit, I was nervous. I really didn’t know a lot about the franchise, so I Googled the $H!T out of “Transformers,” then pitched some ideas to my girlfriend who likes almost everything I come up with. So now I introduce to you, a robot, in disguise, built to wage war…against…the LSAT…(dramatic pause)…CONTRAPOSITRON!!!!

Any LSAT test-taking Transformer must have a sweet name and a cool power to go along with it. Contrapositron fills the bill. She (yes, she) has the power to determine the logical equivalent of a conditional statement. She slays the Logical Reasoning sections, flipping and negating sufficient and necessary conditions with robotic flair.

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Prepping for LSAT Prep: How to Get a Head Start on Studying

If you’re planning on taking a class to prepare for the September LSAT (say, perhaps, one of Blueprint’s soon-to-begin classes), you may be wondering what you should be doing to prepare before class starts.

The good news is that you don’t need to do much. The point of an LSAT class is to teach you the skills you’ll need to conquer the LSAT. There are no prerequisites, and the LSAT doesn’t test any kind of specialized knowledge or anything you’d need to start memorizing.

The most important thing you can do before LSAT class starts, then, is to have fun. Once class starts, you’re going to have to work your, uh, donkey off. You’ll have homework to do and practice tests to review. Variables from LSAT Logic Games will dance through your dreams, and you’ll be that person who always points out the flawed logic in everything your (soon to be former) friends say.

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2014 June LSAT: To Cancel Your LSAT Score or Not to Cancel

So you took the June LSAT Monday. It wasn’t the dreamlike experience you hoped it would be. Now you’re wondering, “Should I cancel my LSAT score?”

We’re here to help.

First, let’s go over what it means to cancel your LSAT score and how to do it. LSAC has to receive your cancellation request within six days of the LSAT. You can send your request by fax or overnight mail; there’s no way to cancel your LSAT score online. LSAC tells you exactly what you need to send to cancel your LSAT score.

If you cancel your June LSAT score, law schools will see that you took the exam and canceled, but they won’t ever know what you would have scored.

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Aaron Cohn’s 2014 June LSAT Predictions

The June LSAT is coming up in but a few days, so it’s time for our quarterly exercise of predicting what will appear on the test. I spent a week in the desert chasing visions of the LSAT. I also spent several days hiding in the bushes in the LSAC parking lot to really get in touch with the energy coming from that building. Here’s what I’m feeling:

2014 June LSAT Predictions: Logic Games

February LSAT Logic Games were reported to be a bit unusual. Rumor has it that there was even a circular ordering game, something that hadn’t been on a released LSAT in more than 10 years.

I predict a return to basics for the June LSAT: a little bit of routine ordering, maybe an in and out game, and so on. My crystal ball also says there’ll be a 1:1 ordering game with a bit of a unique twist.

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How to Get in Optimal Test-Taking Mode for the June LSAT

You’ve spent a lot time preparing for the June LSAT (hopefully). Now that we’re down to crunch time, it’s time to start thinking about the little things that can make a big difference. And as it turns out, that list boils mainly down to basic human needs. Sure, you’ve been sleeping and eating for the past few decades without any help from us, but there are a couple special considerations when it comes to the LSAT – here’s what you need to know.

Key #1 to Getting in Optimal June LSAT Test-Taking Mode: Sleep

Of course, it’s important to be well-rested on LSAT test day. June test-takers are lucky in that you don’t need to worry about waking up early for the exam – every other administration of the LSAT starts at 8:30 a.m.!

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3 Reasons Shaq Going to Law School Should Inspire You

In what is certainly my favorite “news” story of last week, Shaquille O’Neal announced that he is considering going to law school (and is studying for the LSAT already). Unfortunately for the Big Shaqtus, there are a few unique obstacles he may face along the way to earning a J.D. Fortunately for all other prospective LSAT and law students, these obstacles can be a source of inspiration.

How Shaq Going to Law School Should Inspire You I: His Size

On the basketball court, Shaq’s massive physique was a tremendous asset; in an LSAT test center, it would be quite the opposite. To put this in perspective, I am an averagely built, 5’11” male, and I felt cramped by the combination desk/chair at my test center.

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One Final Week Before the June LSAT: What You Need to Do

The June LSAT is a week away. That doesn’t sound like a lot of time, but you can get a lot done in the next seven days. OK, technically it’s six days, since it’s probably a good idea to have a day of rest before the LSAT. But hey, God created the universe in six days with a day of rest, so you can probably at least manage to squeeze a couple more points out of your LSAT score.

Here are some tips for your final week before the June LSAT:

Keep your foot on the gas.

With only seven days until game time, you mind might start to get clouded with doubts and distractions. Maybe you haven’t reached your target LSAT score yet. You’re worried about how you’re going to perform next Monday and are thinking, “What if I get sick the day before?” “What if I get stuck on a logic game?” “Am I going to have to retake?”

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A Million Ways to Die on the LSAT

Hey Dude! It’s a little wild and a little strange, getting your LSAT score in that range. If you’re too young for that classic 90’s Nickelodeon reference then maybe you’ve heard of Seth MacFarlane’s new movie, A Million Ways to Die in the West.

Whatever your age, in the spirit of western comedy, how ‘bout you saddle up, partner, while I regale you with some of the million ways to die on the LSAT.

So prepare to be regaled…on a horse, if possible.

#1 Way to Die on the LSAT: Forgetting Your LSAT Admission Ticket
If you don’t have your ticket then you’re not getting in the LSAT test center.

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LSAC’s Disability Discrimination Settlement: What it Means

We wrote at the beginning of the year about how, due to a ruling by California courts, LSAC could no longer disclose which scores were taken under accommodated testing conditions. The catch was that the ruling only applied to LSAT test-takers in California.

Well, sound the trumpets and ring the bells, because that’s no longer the case. LSAC settled with the U.S. Department of Justice, agreeing to fork over $7.73 million (no wonder it costs so much for simple changes like switching testing centers!) and to stop flagging the LSAT scores of test-takers who received extra time.

On the one hand, it’s a policy change that makes sense. The point of allowing test-takers with ADHD to take the test with extra time was to level the playing field, and if those LSAT scores are flagged, it’s not at all clear whether the playing field was actually leveled.