Tag Archive: LSAT tips

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How to Reading Comp

Many a jaded LSAT student has rolled his/her eyes and said, “I don’t need to study for the Reading Comprehension section – I already know how to read!”

The fact that you are reading this blog post means you are probably correct about the second part of that statement. But the first part – no way. Sure, you’ve probably been reading more or less since the days when “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” was the pinnacle of entertainment options, but the skills required to do well on the Reading Comprehension section are a very different beast. Here are my top tips for improving your Reading Comprehension score.

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Five Resolutions for the February Exam

Welcome back to the grind, LSAT-takers! The holidays are over, and it’s time to put your game face on because the February LSAT sure ain’t gonna take itself.

On that note, I had the misfortune a few days back of hearing the smarmiest of exchanges on the radio.

Warming up her guest, the host politely inquired, “So, have you laid out your resolutions yet?”

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From the Archives: Tricky LSAT Phrases to Keep an Eye Out For

This post originally ran on January 15, 2013 – but as it turns out, LSAC is still up to the same tricks. Avoid wording-related confusion on the LSAT by brushing up on these commonly-confused phrases.

The skills that the LSAT tests are complicated and difficult to learn. Whether it’s diagramming conditional statements, assembling the setup to a game, or knowing what to pay attention to in reading comp, this stuff ain’t easy. But what can make things even harder is when the LSAT buries these already-confusing concepts in perplexing linguistic phrasings.

Luckily, we’re here to help.

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The LSAT is Coming…dun dun dun

We’re just a few months away from the October LSAT, which means that our courses are ABOUT TO GO DOWN. If you’ve made the (right) decision to sign up with us, we’ve listed some tips to help you get the most out of your course and also some vital life-saving tips that’ll prevent you from totally sh*tting on yourself on that first day. We get it. It happens.

First, a bit about myself. Two years ago, I was gearing up to take an LSAT prep class with Blueprint. I was lucky enough to have Matt Riley as my instructor (he’s one of the founders of Blueprint—he is a fantastic teacher and a great guy). After completing the class and taking the LSAT, I landed a job as an instructor for Blueprint. I taught for a little while before accepting an offer of admission from Columbia. I am now gearing up to begin my second year there! All of that to say, I know the Blueprint course method from both the perspective of a student and the perspective of an instructor. Consider yourself a lucky reader.

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Down-to-the-Wire Tips for Every Section on the June LSAT

It’s the last week of LSAT prep, and most of you are struggling with a specific section. The LSAT blog is here to help.

In general, you don’t want to focus solely on your weakest LSAT section. It seems counterintuitive, but you’ll progress faster if you mix up your practice. There’s some good science behind this – you can read about it in Make it Stick – or you can just take my word for it.

Let’s get down to specific tips:

If you’re struggling with Reading Comprehension:

Reading Comprehension is probably the most difficult LSAT section to prep for, but improvement is definitely possible.

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Cinco de Mayo’s Cinco de LSAT Tips

Cinco de Mayo is here! It’s kind of like the Fourth of July but with less Bruce Springsteen and more accordions. This holiday has a varied significance, but for us at the LSAT blog, Cinco de Mayo means that there is one month left before the June LSAT. Don’t panic. Panic doesn’t mix well with a belly full of tacos and tequila.

To help you get over the guilt of getting drunk on a Monday, here are five tips to improve your LSAT score:

LSAT Tip Numero Uno: Memorize your Logical Reasoning flaws

The June LSAT will spend at least 50 questions testing your knowledge of a dozen common logical reasoning flaws. Most LSAT questions involve describing, exploiting, fixing, or avoiding flawed reasoning. If you don’t know your flaws, your June LSAT will be more disappointing than a piñata filled with raisins and black licorice.

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Redo Questions When You Study for the LSAT

At this point, you’re hopefully well on your way to crushing the October LSAT. If you’re like most people, the 6000 or so questions released by LSAC will be more than enough to get you to an awesome LSAT score. But sometimes people end up doing all 6000 LSAT questions and still need more. If this has happened to you, maybe you just studied a lot harder and faster than you thought, and ran out prematurely. Or maybe you took the LSAT, bombed it, and are now retaking it, but are quickly running out of unseen questions. For whatever reason, this is a pretty common thing that happens to people, but isn’t as much of an actual problem as you might think.

First of all, think about that number – 6000.