Tag Archive: LSAT

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Practice Exam 1? Forget About It

April just started, which means that nearly every one of the Blueprint spring classroom courses, which prepare aspiring law students for the June LSAT, has begun. Which means, if you’re one of the many Blueprint students in these classes, you have just taken Practice Exam 1. Or, if you’re using Blueprint’s online course and you’re following the schedule we laid out for you, you’ve recently taken Practice Exam 1. Or — we’re an inclusive bunch — maybe you’re using a different study plan to prepare for the June LSAT, and you’re just here for a little extra advice. In that case, you should have recently taken a baseline diagnostic test before you began your studies in earnest. And hey, if you want to call that “Practice Exam 1” like all the cool Blueprint students, you do your thing.

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Getting Your Study Game Right for the LSAT

If there’s one thing pre-law students have down pat, it’s studying. You don’t decide to go to law school unless you have certain tendencies, and those specific tendencies often correlate with the types of traits that lead a student to, say, take on an extra research project or start an essay — gasp — the week before it’s due instead of the night before it’s due. Basically, pre-law students tend to be pretty damn good at studying.

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Get Some More Pre-LSAT Training!

The June LSAT’s a little more than couple months away, but if you’re still waiting to start your LSAT studying, there are a few things you can now do to build good habits. Last week, we broke down an article like you would on the LSAT Reading Comp section. We’re going to do the same thing again today.

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Classes for the June LSAT are starting very soon, and July classes are around corner!

Last Tuesday, the earth– as if nodding to the sun, affirming that it too was over this winter business — tilted toward the sun. Spring Equinox had passed, making it official: the dregs of winter are over. Spring has sprung.

What’s your favorite part of the new season? The warming of the air? The promise of summer? The renewal of all manner of flora and fauna? The accompanying need for a steady supply of antihistamines?

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A Law School Reverses Its Policy on Accepting the GRE

The law school admission process was shaken up this cycle with news that a slew of law schools would be accepting applicants taking the GRE, rather than just the LSAT. Well, some recent news out of George Washington Law School should give any law school applicant assurance that, between the two exams, the LSAT is still very much here to stay.

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Blueprint’s Guide to LSAT Testing Centers

The LSAT is supposed to be the great equalizer for law school applicants. It’s tough for admissions officers to compare a mechanical engineering major at MIT with a 3.6 GPA to a communications major with a 4.2 GPA at Central Nowhere University. But everyone, allegedly, takes the same LSAT. So it’s theoretically fair to compare someone who got a 160 to someone who got a 152. The Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) takes great care to “equate” each LSAT, to ensure that, for example, a 160 on one LSAT administration means the same thing as a 160 on a different LSAT administration. So everyone takes the same LSAT, no matter which administration you take or where you take the exam.

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The LSAT vs. The Bar Exam

The formal part of your legal education is book-ended by two exams. At the front, the LSAT and, at the end, the bar exam. While you’re probably familiar — or in the process of becoming familiar — with the LSAT, the bar exam is foreign to most applicants and law students. This post is going to compare and contrast the LSAT with the bar exam to help demystify what’s ahead.