Tag Archive: october 2012 lsat

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A Toast to the LSAT in 2012

2012 is but hours away from being in the books. Four administrations of the LSAT were among the many events of the past year. To each of these LSAT tests, a toast:

Here’s to the February 2012 LSAT, for showing us that it’s still possible to keep secrets in our digital, social-networked age. You will live on only in the memories of the lucky LSAT test takers who entered a test center on February 11.

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The Toughest Questions From the October 2012 LSAT

Now that the dust has settled from the release of the October LSAT (as well as its LSAT scores), it’s time to take a look at the actual meat of the test. There were a number of different questions that people struggled with, but I probably heard more complaints about the following three than any others (excluding the zones game and !Kung reading comp). We can’t reproduce the questions in full, so if you took the October LSAT look at your test PDFs to follow along.

Toughest October 2012 LSAT Question No. 1: LR 1, #13

Building material controversies. It doesn’t get much more exciting than this. In this question we learn that there’s some rogue construction material called papercrete. Most builders think it’s no good for big buildings.

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What to Consider Before Cancelling Your October LSAT Score

If you took the October 2012 LSAT, then the window for cancelling your LSAT score is rapidly closing. You have only six calendar days from the day of the October LSAT to formally request that LSAC cancel your LSAT score (so, by Friday). Lucky for you, they offer a number of ways for you to pull the proverbial ripcord.

You can 1) send a signed fax, 2) overnight a letter or 3) send LSAC’s printable cancellation form by expedited mail. Make sure you actually request an LSAT score cancellation, include your name and LSAC account number and a signature. Then just wait for confirmation that your parachute was properly deployed (no mixing metaphors in this paragraph!).

Now that we’ve got that bit of housekeeping out of the way, you need to decide whether or not to cancel your LSAT score.

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October 2012 LSAT Blog Carnival

The October LSAT is in the books, and reactions have been mixed. It was either the hardest LSAT you’ve ever taken, or the easiest. You’ll have to wait for your LSAT score to find out for sure.

We’ve got a fantastic comments thread going down on our October LSAT Instant Recap, written by Blueprint LSAT Prep’s own Colin Elzie — who took his third career LSAT despite coming down with mono.

Blueprint LSAT Prep’s Matt Shinners followed that up with yesterday’s October LSAT Morning Cometh post, which takes a look at the exam 24 hours after its completion. Usually LSAT test-takers feel much different about the LSAT after they’ve had a night’s rest to think about it.

Another way to gauge how people are feeling about the October LSAT is to take a stroll around the blogosphere.

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October 2012 LSAT Instant Recap

I just walked home after taking the third LSAT of my life. If you’re reading this, you likely just took the exact same exam. Congratulations to all of us, my friends, and thank God it’s over.

My experience was interesting, to say the least. I’m currently in the middle of a bout with mono, and haven’t eaten any solid food in a few days. Also, while we at Blueprint LSAT Prep always recommend getting a good night’s sleep before the test, I foolishly spent all of last night fighting off a fever and running to the bathroom. Needless to say, I don’t think I pulled a 180. C’est la vie.

But enough about me, let’s talk about the October LSAT.