Tag Archive: october lsat predictions

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Matt Shinners’s 2013 October LSAT Predictions

October. The month of terrifying things. Ghosts. Zombies. Sparkly vampires. And the LSAT.

Whereas we know what to expect from those monsters, the LSAT is an unknown quantity, and thus most terrifying of all. Luckily, I’m here with my Ouija board and a bottle of Scotch to look into the future and see what awaits you all this weekend on the October LSAT.

2013 October LSAT Prediction I: Logic Games

The June LSAT Logic Games were fairly straightforward, except for one killer game. Even our mystery instructor who sat for the June LSAT was momentarily tripped up by it.

So what to expect after an average section with a hard game? A slightly harder than average section without any particularly hard game!

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Matt Riley’s October 2012 LSAT Predictions

It’s that time of year again. The LSAT countdown is on. 72 hours. 71 hours. 70 hours. 69 hours…

There are thousands of students around the country who are filled with anxiety about this Saturday’s LSAT. And, as always, there are thousands of students who would love to know what is going to appear on it.

That’s where I come in.

Over the last few years, I have made various predictions about upcoming LSAT administrations. Some rather obvious, some utterly ridiculous, some right on the nose.

With the October LSAT three days away, here we go again.

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Predictions for the October LSAT

I learned a couple important things this week.  First, in my constant quest to keep up with the slang used by the students in my class, I was instructed that it is a very bad thing to “spill your haterade”.  Or it might have been bad to pour it on someone.  But either way, you have to be careful with haterade.  (Thanks, Wu-Tang.)

Second, and more important for our discussion here, I learned yet again that LSAT students are very interested in figuring out what is going to be tested on the LSAT before they actually take the test.  There is no empirical way to discern exactly what is going to be tested (otherwise I would own a small island in the Caribbean by now), but the issue warrants some conversation nonetheless.