Tag Archive: October LSAT

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To Retake the LSAT or Not Retake the LSAT?

With October LSAT scores out this week, I’m sure many of you are either kicking back with a well-deserved beer or else grinding away wrapping up your applications. Here, however, I’d like to address those among us with a less than happy outcome

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Boo! LSAC Releases Some Spooky October 2015 LSAT Scores

This week, LSAC decided to up the late-October spookiness level by releasing scores for the October 2015 LSAT.

I’ll get right to the number that has all of you on the edge of your seats: The curve was -12, meaning that of the 101 scored questions on the test, you needed to get 89 correct for a 170. For a 160, you needed to get 73 or 74 questions correct. For the keenly interested, here’s the score conversion table.

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October LSAT: The Morning Cometh

Those taking the October 2015 LSAT have run the gauntlet and emerged on the other side, (hopefully) relatively unscathed. As post-LSAT-celebration hangovers subside, let’s delve into the chatter we’ve heard about the October 2015 LSAT. We’ve heard multiple reports that one of the Logical Reasoning sections was especially difficult, which is unusual – we often hear that there were a couple really tricky Logical Reasoning questions on the test, but it’s atypical to hear that an overall section was especially tough. In addition, we’ve heard rumors that there were no Main Point questions in Logical Reasoning, which doesn’t often happen – Main Point questions are far from the most common question type, but you can generally count on at least a few per test.

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October 2015 LSAT Instant Recap

Huzzah! You’re done with the October 2015 LSAT!


We know that you probably don’t ever want to think about the LSAT again. But before you begin your well-deserved celebrations, take a moment to tell us how it went.

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What to Do During October LSAT Crunch Time

You have about three and a half weeks before the October LSAT. It’s crunch time. But you’re probably busy with school, work, or both. What to do, what to do? Well, here are some tips.

Focus On Logic Games

The Logic Games section is the most learnable part of the LSAT. There’s nothing optional about the games strategies you’ve learned. You have to know and master all of them. You don’t have the time to freestyle it. Don’t know the difference between an overbooked and an underbooked game, and why it matters? Go back and review. Don’t know how to play the numbers? Go back and review.

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The LSAT Preseason Is Over

The NFL regular season begins tonight. The preseason, an annual four-game exercise devoted to figuring out roster spots and fleecing season ticket holders, is over. Starting tonight, there will be much less talk of deflated balls and the extent to which said balls merit punishment for the alleged deflators, and much more talk of who’s winning and losing.

It just so happens that the shift from the preseason to the regular season coincides with a shift in how those studying for the October LSAT should view their practice tests. Of course, on the LSAT, nothing counts until the real thing, but there are parallels nonetheless.

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Why You Should Have Some “Fun” This Labor Day…Remember That Word?

Happy long weekend everyone! If you’re studying for the upcoming LSAT, you might find it a little bit difficult to take a day off. This post is meant to help you make the most of studying on Labor Day (while maybe still having some fun). I’m also going to touch briefly on my approach to days off more generally.
Now, before we go any further, please don’t be the person that brings an LSAT book to a Labor Day barbecue. You don’t want to be that person. Also, please don’t be the person who only talks about the LSAT. You don’t want to be that person either. With that said, there are a couple things I would recommend doing to get the most out of your (hopefully) abbreviated studies on Labor Day.

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Show Us Your Study Buddy And Get Discounts on a Fall Course!

Studying for the LSAT isn’t easy, and chances are you get by with a little help from your friends. Over at the Blueprint LSAT Instagram, we want to know what study buddy has been keeping you sane as you try to figure out Patricia and Mei’s exact point of disagreement.

So here’s the deal: Tag us in a pic of your study buddy, whatever that may be (no, a pic of your limited edition, 2013 bottle of Jack Daniels doesn’t count), and you can get $300 off any fall classroom course or $100 off the fall online course!

To get the discount:
1. Tag @blueprintlsat and 3 of your closest study buddies.
2. Add #lsat and a hashtag of your school.

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One Month To Go ‘Til the October LSAT!

Don’t panic, but there’s exactly one month left before the October LSAT. Being four weeks out from test day is a frightening prospect, no matter where you’re at or where you want to be. We get that, but we also get that some students (you know who you are) psych themselves out a little extra around this time in their studies. Our goal here is to calm those neurotic perfectionists, and maybe also light a fire under some other folks’ bums.

With a month to go, you want to be near a mastery of the fundamentals. Within the next week or so, you should assess your diagramming, your RC annotating, and your skill at Grouping, Ordering, and Combination games. It’s important to spend a good amount of time drilling in these next couple weeks to hammer out any imperfections in your skills.

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October LSAT Check-In

To Register Or Not to Register

Wanna take the October LSAT? Then you need to register before the September 9 “late registration” deadline. If you’ve spent the last two months, or more, studying for the LSAT, go ahead and register. You’ll have until the night before the LSAT to back out without any black mark on your record.

If you’re planning on cramming for the LSAT, as in, you haven’t started your prep yet, forget about the October LSAT. You’ll be better off taking the December LSAT.

Significant score improvements often don’t show up until the last few weeks leading up to the LSAT, so don’t put too much stock into your current practice test scores. If you’ve given LSAT prep your best shot, register.