Tag Archive: ordering games

BPPaaron-lsat-blog-scenarios
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Here we go, yo—when should you make a scenario?

Scenarios are one of the most killer strategies for LSAT logic games. They don’t work for every game, but when you can split a game into two, three, or four possibilities upfront it’ll often make the questions just breeze by.

In general, look to do scenarios when there’s something in a game that can only go two to four ways and you think that trying those two to four possibilities would help you figure out other thinks in the game. Some kinds of rules lead to scenarios more often than others, so today we’ll cover rules in ordering games that often make scenarios a good idea. If you see one of the following things in a game, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you should do scenarios. But the thought should at least cross your mind.

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Finding Subtle Deductions in Logic Games

Today’s post is in response to a student question about Logic Games:

Other than looking for variables in common, how can you find ways to get deductions from combining rules?

Of course, the easiest way to make deductions is to look at multiple rules covering the same variable or spot. But as the student asks, what about when that doesn’t happen? It doesn’t mean there’s nothing to be found. It’s often all about what takes up space.

In an ordering game, if there are multiple blocks, especially if they’re big, assess how they’ll fit together. Will they have to overlap? Will they get in each other’s way? Sometimes, this leads to a concrete deduction.

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Predictions for the December 2011 LSAT

Here we go again. As the tryptophan-induced daze wears off, LSAT students are faced with a brutal reality. The December LSAT is just two days away.

At this point, studying is rather pointless. In fact, relying on those good old “cramming” techniques that got you through freshman biology would be counterproductive in the final days. So what can we offer you for guidance at this point?

Semi-outlandish predictions about what will appear on the December LSAT, that’s what.

1. Experimenting with the Experimental

For years, nay, for decades, the experimental (unscored) section of the test has been one of the first three sections.