Tag Archive: Presidential Election

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D-Fence or D-Bate?

Showing all the pride of a stepfather watching his entitled stepson’s spoken word performance at a coffee shop teeming with hipsters, the Democratic National Committee did its best to bury the second Democratic presidential debate under a mountain of college football. Saturday night’s debate drew 8.5 million viewers, which might seem respectable until you compare it to other debates. The first Democratic debate on CNN drew nearly twice as many viewers, 15.3 million or so.

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Undergraduate/Graduate School Breakdown of the 2016 Presidential Candidates

The 2012 presidential election pitted two Harvard Law grads against each other: Barack Obama ’91 and Mitt Romney ‘75. Perhaps deepening the Ivy League rivalry, it seems that the Democratic Party will opt this year for a Yale Law grad, Hillary Clinton.

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Logical Reasonings / 10.20.15

Democratic candidate, Jim Webb, drops out of the Presidential race. Huffington Post

This may be the most obscene Appellate Opinion ever written. Above the Law

Examining constitutional violations at the New Orleans’ district attorney’s office. New York Times

Necessary reading about law school’s Gainful Employment initiative. Huffington Post

A Friends spinoff is finally here; starring hamsters. Mashable

[youtube]https://youtu.be/ymhEE6ZNlr0[/youtube]

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Watch a Compilation of Fallacies From the 10/13 Democratic Debate

Check out Democratic Presidential candidates’ most memorable fallacious statements from October 13th’s Democratic Debate on CNN. Just so you know — These videos a part of our continuous series where we will analyze fallacies in both Republican and Democratic debates. For a detailed explanation about our methodologies, thought process, and fallacy definitions check out our

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Fallacy Watch: Democratic Debate 10/13

As you probably know, since we prepare people to take the LSAT, identifying invalid arguments is something of a professional occupation for us. When particularly egregious arguments seep into our social discourse unimpeded, we at Blueprint believe it’s our duty to point our their illogic. It’s kind of like our version of picking up trash on the street when we see it drifting by.