Tag Archive: reading comp

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LSAT Reading Comprehension: It Ain’t What You Think

It’s just words, right? WRONG. If you’re planning to take the LSAT, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve taken other standardized tests before — the SAT or ACT, perhaps even the GRE or GMAT. These tests all have one thing in common: reading comprehension. On the surface, all reading comp looks pretty similar. There’s a

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The December 2016 LSAT: Instant Recap

Good luck today! Check back here after the exam for information or to add what you know in the comments. We’ll be updating throughout the day.

An important note: LSAC prohibits us from publishing any big specifics from any LSAT (this includes individual questions/answers, trying to identify the experimental section, etc.). So if your comment is removed, it most likely violated some kind of rule or was close enough that we didn’t want to risk it. Here’s a pretty good guide for what’s acceptable.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

When you finish a 3.5 hour-long practice test, the last thing you want to do after scoring it is to go over the questions you got wrong. But reviewing practice tests is ridiculously important. It’s as valuable as taking the practice tests in the first place, if you go about it strategically.

First of all, don’t review your test right after you score it. You’re tired and frustrated – at least in my personal experience. I recommend reviewing each test the next day.

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Speed up!

There is a lot to learn for the LSAT, from diagramming conditionals, to memorizing flaw categories, to wrangling with combo games. The December LSAT is fast approaching, and hopefully students taking the test next month will be familiar with most of the material at this point.

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Last-Minute Tips: Reading Comprehension

With less than three weeks until the June LSAT, it’s time to buckle down on studying. This week we’re offering one important last-minute tip for each LSAT section. Today, we talk about Reading Comprehension; stay tuned for Logic Games and Logical Reasoning!

Reading Comprehension is the most familiar section on the LSAT. Everyone taking the test already knows how to read (I assume). They answered reading questions on the SAT. They read the newspaper (kidding). So, as most people start studying for the LSAT, they feel like RC is one area they don’t have to worry too much about.

Which is good, of course. But the tradeoff is that people often feel like there are few good ways to improve. Fatalism about your RC score tends to set in, especially as your test day approaches.

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The Role of Luck on the LSAT (and How to Prepare for it)

Today, all across the US and Canada (this is an LSAT blog, after all), many people of Irish heritage and not-one-bit-Irish heritage alike will celebrate St. Patrick by wearing green, drinking things that are green but aren’t normally supposed to be (If I must drink something green, make it a Chartreuse and soda), and generally carousing about town getting utterly plastered.

Nonetheless, it makes for a good excuse to discuss the role of luck in the LSAT. For the most part, the LSAT is a predictable test. Practice tests will generally give you a good gauge of where you stand. But at the margins, chance can play a role on LSAT test day. Here are some ways it can factor in.

How Luck Plays a Role on the LSAT I: The experimental section

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Aaron Cohn’s 2014 February LSAT Predictions

The February LSAT is coming up this weekend, so as usual it’s time for us to predict what delights it’ll hold. I’m honored to take over the LSAT predictions (I didn’t know you were allowed to do it if you’re not named Matt), but I also feel lucky: since the February LSAT is undisclosed, no one will be able to prove me wrong. It’s a nice way to start off, as I get my powers of clairvoyance back into shape.

2014 February LSAT prediction I: Logic Games

The December LSAT had a harder than usual Logic Games section. None of the games was all that bad on its own, but only one was truly easy. Of the others, one was standard but hard, one was a bit unusual and moderately hard, and the last one was typical and moderate.

On the February LSAT, I’d expect a return to the recent trend: one killer game, with the other three being easy-to-moderate and fairly standard. The December LSAT had two rule substitution questions, whereas usually there’s no more than one. Expect a break from those.

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How I Got My 180 LSAT Score: Kevin’s June LSAT Story

Today’s guest post on the LSAT blog is from Kevin, a student in Blueprint LSAT Prep’s online course who earned a 180 LSAT score on the June LSAT. This is how he did it.

My junior year at UC Irvine, I was forced to confront the LSAT, which I dreaded. I had always felt that I could do well in school if I put in the effort, but that the LSAT tested some sort of natural intelligence that couldn’t really be improved, regardless of effort. That’s why I was devastated when my first practice test score came out to be 152. I knew I had my work cut out for me.

Rising to the challenge, I gave up partying with my fraternity — turning down illustrious parties like Booze Cruise and Blackout — to focus on studying. Every day, I would sit myself in the library for 4-5 hours to watch Blueprint’s video lessons and do the corresponding homework. After slaving away for an entire quarter, I finally got to Practice Test 2.

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Real LSATs Have Curves: A Look at the 2013 December LSAT

December LSAT scores were released yesterday (for most), and a lot of discussion has centered around the test’s forgiving LSAT curve. According to the 2013 December LSAT score conversion chart, you could miss 14 questions and nonetheless get a 170, or 3 questions for a perfect 180. LSAT scoring scales are pre-equated; in other words, your LSAT score is independent of the performance of the other people who took the LSAT that day. So a forgiving LSAT curve means that this LSAT had relatively hard questions.

And so I sat down early this morning to take the 2013 December LSAT and to try to figure out why the LSAT curve was so forgiving. Question difficulty can be hard to subjectively determine, and can vary a bit from person to person. I fully expected to have to dig deeply to figure out what made this particular test so hard for the average test taker.