Tag Archive: reading comprehension

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Speeding Up on Reading Comp

It’s hard to finish LSAT sections in time, and for many people Reading Comp is the toughest section to get through. You have to read the passages, which can take a while, and then if you’re not sure what you’re doing on the questions you can easily end up reading whole chunks of the passage again and then the time just slips and before you know it it’s the five minute warning and how many questions are left? Oh crap, and you start to try to go faster but nothing makes sense anymore and then they call time.

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The Many Instances of Examples on Reading Comp

When it comes to the Reading Comprehension section on the LSAT, my eternal refrain is that the best success is achieved by focusing primarily on the structure of a passage, with the content of the passage as a secondary concern. (In fact, I’m working on boiling that phrase down for use as a catchy statement on my tombstone.)

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Get Some More Pre-LSAT Training!

The June LSAT’s a little more than couple months away, but if you’re still waiting to start your LSAT studying, there are a few things you can now do to build good habits. Last week, we broke down an article like you would on the LSAT Reading Comp section. We’re going to do the same thing again today.

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Mastering the Third Stage of Your LSAT Studies

The February LSAT is growing nearer and so Blueprint LSAT classes are getting into the last few lessons with new material. In the last few months, we’ve gone over what to cover in the first and second stages of your studies. Now let’s talk about the big and important things to focus on in the third stage.

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How can questions in Reading Comp passages help you?

Reading Comprehension passages, like the rest of the LSAT, is prone to repeating certain structures over and over. After all, there are only so many ways to set up or argue about a short passage. In fact, noticing certain often-used passage structures (which Blueprint LSAT students may recognize as what we call the “secondary structures” of a passage) can vastly improve your overall understanding of a passage. But if you’re fortunate enough to notice a secondary structure, how does that knowledge actually help you?

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Mastering the Second Stage of Your LSAT Studies

A few weeks ago, we gave you an outline of what you should focus on during the first stage of your LSAT studies. Today we’re going to give you a low down on what to focus on during the second stage.

Santa’s made his list and checked it twice, and students in Blueprint LSAT’s Winter classes are getting a special gift this holiday season — the gift of starting a new family of Logical Reasoning questions! (The verdict is still out on whether this means they’ve been naughty or nice.)

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Our Logic Games and Reading Comp books are on sale, for your holiday shopping and LSAT dominating needs

Back by popular demand, we’re once again offering a sale on our amazing Logic Games and Reading Comprehension prep books! The last time we offered this sale on Amazon, these books sold like the virtual equivalents of hot cakes, so we’re running it back. From now until Monday, January 1 at 9 am PST, you can find both prep books discounted to the all-time low price of $39.00 on Amazon.

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Nailing the Author’s Attitude on RC

When we talk about Reading Comprehension passages on the LSAT, we talk a lot about the author — is the author present or absent? And if present, what is the author’s attitude?

Of course, that can seem like an odd question — doesn’t every passage have an author, since someone had to actually write the darn thing? But of course, as with many other things on the LSAT, the definition we’re using is ever-so-slightly different from the definition you might be used to seeing.