Tag Archive: reading comprehension

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Your February 2016 LSAT Recap

The February LSAT is in the books. Compared to the other LSATs in the year, the February LSAT has an aura of mystery about it. Since the test is undisclosed, no one outside LSAC ever gets to see it, except on test day. This leads to the rumor that the February LSAT is weird or different.

It isn’t.

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How to Tackle Brutal Reading Comp Passages

You’ve been practicing your reading every day for the past two months, reading every “Warning: Slippery Floor” sign and nutritional label at the grocery store, but lo and behold, test day comes, and you get a reading passage with difficult subject matter. It’s something science-y, where every other word in the first paragraph is followed by a comma and its definition.

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How to Reading Comp

Many a jaded LSAT student has rolled his/her eyes and said, “I don’t need to study for the Reading Comprehension section – I already know how to read!”

The fact that you are reading this blog post means you are probably correct about the second part of that statement. But the first part – no way. Sure, you’ve probably been reading more or less since the days when “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” was the pinnacle of entertainment options, but the skills required to do well on the Reading Comprehension section are a very different beast. Here are my top tips for improving your Reading Comprehension score.

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The Day After the Day After

You shut your friends and family out of your life. You gave up that thing that was way too distracting. (Yes, we know about that thing. Blueprint is the Santa Claus of test preparation.) You studied and studied and studied. You pleaded with fate or whatever higher power you believe in. Maybe you even pleaded with a higher power you don’t believe in. In short, you turned your happy life upside down over a multiple-choice test. That test happened this past Saturday.

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A Pre-LSAT Pep Talk

You’ve waited for it. You’ve dreamt about it. You’ve lost friends incessantly talking about it and you don’t mind.

And here it is.

With the LSAT just hours away, students often wonder how to spend that last anxious day. Cram? Wind down? I’ve heard recommendations from all across the spectrum, and I think there’s some merit to each, but here I’ll divulge my tried-and-true personal strategy.

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Lessons Learned From the October 2015 LSAT

October LSAT scores came out last week. That means the October LSAT was released into the wild. I was perhaps a little bit too excited to sit down with a timer and take it — it had been a little while since I last took a full test timed. Here’s my overall impression.

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October LSAT: The Morning Cometh

Those taking the October 2015 LSAT have run the gauntlet and emerged on the other side, (hopefully) relatively unscathed. As post-LSAT-celebration hangovers subside, let’s delve into the chatter we’ve heard about the October 2015 LSAT. We’ve heard multiple reports that one of the Logical Reasoning sections was especially difficult, which is unusual – we often hear that there were a couple really tricky Logical Reasoning questions on the test, but it’s atypical to hear that an overall section was especially tough. In addition, we’ve heard rumors that there were no Main Point questions in Logical Reasoning, which doesn’t often happen – Main Point questions are far from the most common question type, but you can generally count on at least a few per test.

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Tackling Comparative Reading Passages on the LSAT

Reading Comprehension is probably the most ignored section of the LSAT. People tend to think something like, “I’ve been reading since I was five. If I can’t get it by now, I’m just gonna have to live with it.” But, Reading Comp isn’t reading as usual, so putting in the practice does pay off. Reading Comp’s peculiarities are most evident from the Comparative Reading passages. You get two passages and a single set of questions related to one or both passages. When’s the last time you had to go through something like that reading, say, the Huffington Post?

In case you’ve been struggling with Comparative Reading passages, we’ve got your back. Here are some of the strategies our students find helpful.

Step 1: Tag the crap out of the first passage

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Blueprint’s June LSAT Predicitions

Finally, after years of learning at the Birkenstocked feet of the Blueprint LSAT gurus, my time has come to take the heavy mantle of making predictions for the upcoming LSAT. I have consulted my crystal ball (also known as a wine bottle) veeeery closely and I am finally ready to issue the following predictions:

Logic Games
The June 2014 LSAT was infamous for having a circular game that threw students for a loop (see what I did there?), and the February 2014 LSAT was rumored to have a pretty tough circular game as well. The tests since June 2014 have had Logic Games sections of pretty standard difficulty, so we’re about due for another killer game. So, friends, I’m calling it here — expect a game that falls outside the normal ordering/grouping operations.

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Work More Efficiently, Not Faster

If you’re taking the June LSAT, you’re probably concerned about timing. That’s normal. And here’s some good news: even in the next couple weeks until the LSAT, there’s time to improve.

Imagine this: you have to drive somewhere unfamiliar. There’s traffic. You don’t want to be late. Would you run to the car, say, “I don’t know exactly where it is, but I know it’s vaguely north of here,” and then drive north as fast as you can? You might not know where you’re going, but you’ll screech those tires around corners and gun it from every stoplight, even if you end up stuck in traffic a few seconds later. Or would you check traffic, plot a route that avoids it, and drive a little more sensibly?