Tag Archive: reading comprehension

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Mastering the Second Stage of Your LSAT Studies

A few weeks ago, we gave you an outline of what you should focus on during the first stage of your LSAT studies. Today we’re going to give you a low down on what to focus on during the second stage.

Santa’s made his list and checked it twice, and students in Blueprint LSAT’s Winter classes are getting a special gift this holiday season — the gift of starting a new family of Logical Reasoning questions! (The verdict is still out on whether this means they’ve been naughty or nice.)

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Our Logic Games and Reading Comp books are on sale, for your holiday shopping and LSAT dominating needs

Back by popular demand, we’re once again offering a sale on our amazing Logic Games and Reading Comprehension prep books! The last time we offered this sale on Amazon, these books sold like the virtual equivalents of hot cakes, so we’re running it back. From now until Monday, January 1 at 9 am PST, you can find both prep books discounted to the all-time low price of $39.00 on Amazon.

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Nailing the Author’s Attitude on RC

When we talk about Reading Comprehension passages on the LSAT, we talk a lot about the author — is the author present or absent? And if present, what is the author’s attitude?

Of course, that can seem like an odd question — doesn’t every passage have an author, since someone had to actually write the darn thing? But of course, as with many other things on the LSAT, the definition we’re using is ever-so-slightly different from the definition you might be used to seeing.

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Mastering the First Stage of Your LSAT Studies

Now that Blueprint classes for the February LSAT are underway, you’re going to be learning a lot and it’s going to come at you quickly. So this is a good time to go over what’s most important from the first few lessons. What should you really make sure you get down, and what don’t you need to worry about too much.

Here are the things that are really important right now:

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Seeing the Big Picture on Comparative Passages

Comparative Reading Comprehension passages are the baby of the LSAT, having been added to the test in 2007 (practically a blink of an eye for an organization that takes a month to score a Scantron). As the name would suggest, the questions focus on comparing the two passages: Which of these is supported by one passage but not the other? Which is something that both authors have in common? And so on.

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Reading Comp and Logic Games

Yesterday, we took a detailed look at the Logical Reasoning sections on the September 2017 LSAT. We found a set of sections that had a pretty typical distribution of question types, but that leaned heavily on conditionality. Overall, they were a set a pretty mild LR section. But what about the other two sections, Reading Comp and Logic Games? Everyone said the former was crazy difficult, and the latter crazy easy. We’ll dive into those, and this exam’s curve, below.

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Tags, You’re It

Studying for Reading Comprehension is tough. The passages are long, about obscure topics that have almost no impact on your life, and written with a heightened academic tone that is, frankly, boring.

For reference, here is a list of some fun topics from recent LSATs: the legitimacy of dowsing, the misleading nature of brain scans, the fascinating career trajectory of a lacquer artist who became an interior designer and architect, the debate over why Mesolithic-era humans cleared pathways in the woodlands, the demarcations found on clay tablets from Sumer, the rehabilitation of a long-discredited theory by new research, the epistemological value of negative evidence.

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Getting Started with Reading Comprehension

Some students like to ignore the Reading Comprehension section of the LSAT. Maybe they find the passages boring. I have no idea why.

But I think that many students don’t give Reading Comp its due because it seems familiar and that familiarity breeds complacency. You know how to read, after all — that you’ve made it this far into this blog post is ample evidence.

But go back and check your most recent LSAT practice exam. Did you nail the Reading Comp section? If not, you have some work to do. LSAT Reading Comp may seem deceptively familiar, but it’s different. You can improve your score, but it takes the right approach.

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A Legal Primer, for Those Annoying RC Passages About the Law

One of the best things about the LSAT is that you don’t really have to remember any substantive information. Sure, you have to learn some techniques to answer questions, but you don’t have to know any legal facts (and believe me, once you take the bar exam, you’ll truly appreciate how wonderful that difference is).

And yet, many recent LSATs have had Reading Comprehension passages on the law and legal processes.