Tag Archive: retake

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The Guide for Studying for the LSAT a Second Time

This is the guide for LSAT retakes. If you’re still wondering if you should retake, have a look at this post and this post from an actual retaker. I’ll assume you’ve got your mind made up to retake the LSAT.

0. Brush up on fundamentals

Before you do anything else, you have to brush up on your fundamental skills. You need to know how to diagram everything under the sun.

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To Retake or Not?

December LSAT scores are out, and that means many students are now facing a tough choice: retake the test or stick with the score you got?

The question is a perennial one, and one that we’ve tackled before here at Most Strongly Supported. According to data from LSAC, most mid-range test takers (those who scored in the 140s and 150s on their previous LSAT) increase their scores by slightly more than two points when they retake it.

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The Way Forward

The December LSAT was this past Saturday, which, huzzah, you’re done with studying for the dang thing. But what if you feel like you didn’t do as well as you wanted?

First of all, did you really do as poorly as you thought you did? Or are you someone who is always convinced that you did terribly after every exam (“I swear, I failed that test!”), but it always turns out that you did fine (“Never mind, I got an A.”)? In other words, are you a Chicken Little, convinced the world is going to end because you might’ve gotten a few problems wrong (which is perfectly normal, by the way)?

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Logical Reasonings / 3.24.15

A) US News & World Report thinks one reader shouldn’t take the LSAT for a third time, but your circumstances may differ.

B) This list of the country’s most expensive law schools includes five schools in the T14 and TWO SCHOOLS THAT ARE UNRANKED?!?!?! Above the Law

C) Choose a law school using ABA data and statistics (aka not rankings). Prelaw Guru

D) Taylor Swift called out the Princeton Review for misquoting her. Ya got burnt, PRev. Billboard

E) A new nonstick coating could save waste, help industry, and, most important, looks coooooool. New York Times

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Retaking After The February LSAT

After a looong wait, February LSAT scores have finally been released. Although we hope you were thrilled and delighted by your score, odds are that at least some readers are pondering whether to retake the LSAT and, if so, when to do it. We’ve written extensively about how to figure out whether a retake is worthwhile and how to prepare for a second (or third!) round – for instance, this article discusses questions you should ask yourself before committing to a retake, and this article provides a general outline of a study plan for a June retake. Both articles are well worth your time if you think you might want to take the LSAT again.

That said, the February LSAT is rather an unusual beast, so there are a few additional items to consider.

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The June LSAT Retake Study Plan

The February LSAT just happened, and you’re already thinking of June. Maybe you took the LSAT and you just know it didn’t go well. Or maybe you decided you weren’t ready to have an LSAT score, so you pulled out at the last minute. Either way, you want to make sure things go better in June. There’s plenty of time between now and then; in fact it’s a dangerous amount of time. If you put off thinking about the June LSAT, it’ll sneak up on you.

It’s therefore important that you plan out how you’ll study for your retake. Plan out a rough schedule; you can always adjust it later.

Start with a break. Get the LSAT off your mind. You’ve been studying hard, and now you need to just back off and let what you’ve done sink in.

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You Bombed the September LSAT… What Now?

We here at Most Strongly Supported hope that all of our readers awaiting a September LSAT score received good news this week. However, sometimes – for whatever reason – a score might fall short of your hopes and expectations. If you are in that unfortunate position, you may be trying to decide what your next steps should be.

This post is for you, my friend.

If your LSAT score wasn’t what you hoped, you may be considering whether to retake the test in December. Here are some factors to keep in mind as you make that decision:

1. When are you applying?

Let’s get one potential objection to retaking out of the way: the December LSAT will still allow you to apply during this admissions cycle.

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Study Tips for Retaking the December LSAT

You took the LSAT once. Now you need to take it again. It goes without saying that you’d like to do better this time. What about all that material you used the first time? Here’s how you can make the most of your old prep material, and plan your attack for the next test.

Your first step should be to make a quick inventory of the LSAT PrepTests you haven’t touched any of the questions from. Set aside a bunch of these, preferably the more recent ones, to use as timed practice tests. Since you haven’t seen these questions, they’ll be the best indication of where you’re really scoring. Then make a schedule and spread these tests out out between now and test day.

That leaves all the LSAT questions you’ve done already. You might think that you’ve spoiled these questions by doing them; that they’re devoid of the worth they once had. You’d be wrong.

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How Did You Do on the September LSAT?

Yesterday was the last major milestone in the circle of September LSAT prep (naaaaants ingonyama bagithi baba): score release day.

After weeks of anxiety, preppers got to experience just a little bit more — one final gift from LSAC — as scores rolled out painfully slowly, amid reports of crashes on the LSAC website. But hopefully the wait was worth it.

The September curve came in at -12 (that’s twelve wrong answers for a score of 170), slightly less generous than the previous two LSAT’s, but still more lenient than the historical average. This makes some amount of sense, as most of what we’ve heard suggests a fairly middle of the road exam: no outrageously difficult or surprising sections, but nothing that could be called a cakewalk, either.

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September LSAT Wrap Up: To Cancel or Not To Cancel

So you took the LSAT on Saturday. It wasn’t the dreamlike experience you hoped it would be. Now you’re wondering, “Should I cancel my score?” We’re here to help.

First, let’s go over what it means to cancel your LSAT score, and how to do it. LSAC has to receive your cancellation request within six days of the LSAT. You can send your request by fax or overnight mail; there’s no way to cancel your LSAT score online. LSAC tells you exactly what to send to cancel your LSAT score.

If you cancel your September LSAT, law schools will see that you took the test, but they won’t ever know what you would have scored. And neither will you; your September LSAT score will be forever a mystery. It will, however, count toward your limit of three LSAT administrations within two years even if you cancel.