Tag Archive: review

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Your Final Weeks of Study, Logic Games Edition

A couple days ago, we covered how to work on Reading Comprehension as you shift from learning the basics to reviewing and working on timing. Yesterday, we took a look at Logical Reasoning. So, you guessed it, today’s all about those games.

The first step is similar: identify your weaknesses and address them. If there are any types of games that you just don’t feel comfortable with, now’s your time to go over them.

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…And Justice for All

It’s time for the second installment of our new series, The Greatest Lawyer Movies of All Time, in which I review great courtroom dramas in no particular order. This week, on the advice of a student, I wanted to watch “A Few Good Men.” But in the end, I just couldn’t handle the truth. And by the truth, I mean paying $12.99. Why no rental option, iTunes? I need a Blockbuster right about now.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

When you finish a 3.5 hour-long practice test, the last thing you want to do after scoring it is to go over the questions you got wrong. But reviewing practice tests is ridiculously important. It’s as valuable as taking the practice tests in the first place, if you go about it strategically.

First of all, don’t review your test right after you score it. You’re tired and frustrated – at least in my personal experience. I recommend reviewing each test the next day.

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June LSAT: The Morning Cometh

The dust is settling on the June 2015 LSAT, and overall, it sounds like there were some surprises on the test, with a lot of test-takers hoping for a generous curve.

Much like last year, the section that generated the most discussion was Logic Games, where test-takers were faced with an unusual and difficult final game about magazine features. We can’t discuss too many of the particulars, but it sounds like the game gave very few rules, and I’ve heard a few people say that they found at least one of the rules to be confusing. LSAC has been throwing more unusual games at test-takers recently, and it looks like that trend is here to stay.

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Logical Reasonings / 5.21.15

A) You can now rate law schools on Yelp. You don’t even have to change your reviews much… “3 Stars: Loved the service, but the food was unexceptional.” Above the Law

B) Check out LSAC’s bi-annual newsletter if you’re interested in the nitty gritty behind the LSAT. LSAC.org

C) Why is the law school personal statement difficult? Girl’s Guide to Law School

D) The New Mexico Law Review published an entire issue dedicated to the legal issues surrounding Breaking Bad. If you ask me, love of Breaking Bad is way more important than any law school ranking. Wall Street Journal

E) Check out the lost gems and terrible failures that were cut for time during this season of SNL. Splitsider

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How to Review LSAT Questions

In my non-LSAT life, I’m a musician. And for a musician, hearing a recording of yourself can be an edifying but horrifying experience. You might ask, “I really sound like that?”

But here’s the thing. You can clamp your nose shut with a clothespin whenever you go to the bathroom, but that don’t mean your **** don’t stink. If you’re going to improve your skills, you need to know which skills need improvement.

That’s the importance of review as an LSAT student. If you do the homework, get most of them right, pat yourself on the back and move on, you won’t improve much. There’s a lot to be learned from the ones you missed, even if it may be scary to confront those questions.

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The LSAT Academy Awards

The Oscars were last night, and now everyone can spend their Monday debating whether the Academy got it right. We’ll stay away from that, though it does seem that playing someone with a debilitating illness is a great way to improve your chances of winning. Rather, our agenda is to honor films (Oscar-caliber or not) for their significance to the LSAT. Instead of a red carpet, imagine a carpet made of scantrons.

Worst LSAT Prep Advice
This award goes to Whiplash. If you’re striving for excellence on the LSAT, it can help to have good instruction. It’s great if your instructor demands that you put in your best effort. But if your instructor ever throws a chair at your head, it’s probably time to reconsider the relationship. Logical fallacies don’t warrant violence.

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The Year in Prelaw News

We all know that the biggest news of 2014 was the return of French Toast Crunch. That announcement is exciting, to be sure, but don’t forget that 2014 brought some highlights in the world of law school applications as well. The year provided data galore – Employment data! Bar passage data! LSAT data! And, of course, it provided some pretty great memes too.

To refresh your memory, here’s a list of the biggest law school-related news of 2014:

The narrative to which we’ve become accustomed is that numbers in general are down, and 2014 was no exception to that rule. The number of law school applications dropped 8 percent from last year, totaling a decline of 37 percent since 2010.

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5 Things to Do Before the December LSAT

It’s almost show time. You’re in the December LSAT’s green room. It may be a less exciting place than a real green room, but regardless, you’ve got to be ready to perform. Here’s what you should do this week. (Stay tuned to the blog tomorrow for a post about what you shouldn’t do this week. We got you covered.)

Do a targeted review of the areas you still have trouble with.
The LSAT is a test of skills. You can’t cram for it. But you can and should brush up on your weaker areas a little, and do some targeted practice. This is especially true if you find that your accuracy has slipped in a particular area. Try to get it back. Review with an eye towards refining your approach to the questions, and try to solidify your understanding of exactly why the answers are right or wrong.

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September LSAT Recap: Final Thoughts

As of now, all that’s left from the September LSAT is to wait for the scores. The test has been administered, and the deadline to cancel your score has come and gone.

Let’s then go through one last recap of the September LSAT before scores come out, and also discuss what the September LSAT means for those studying for December.

From the impressions I’ve been able to gather, the September LSAT seems to have been fairly unremarkable. There were hard questions, of course, but nothing that had everyone screaming on the way out of the test center, like, say, the fourth Logic Game on the June LSAT.

Over in Logic Games land, there seems to be a rough consensus that the hardest games weren’t all that horribly bad, and that none of the games were terribly unusual.