Tag Archive: schedule

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How long do I study? (Video, babies, video.)

How should you spend your time? That’s a very broad question. All things being equal, we’d recommend putting in the 10,000 or so hours necessary to master the oboe. Oh, no oboe for you? Fair enough. Not many people drop by Most Strongly Supported to talk unpopular woodwind instruments.

No, instead, they drop by to talk about the LSAT and law school. Regarding the former concern, one of the most common questions we get is, “How long should I study for the LSAT?” Like most other things in life, there’s no one-size-fits-all-answer.

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When Should You Start Studying for the LSAT?

You always want to be prepared. When you walk into a test, you want to be so familiar with the material that nothing could surprise you. Even if the test-makers try to throw you a curveball, you want to be so prepared you can just nod knowingly and say “That’s a curveball” and hit a Reggie Jackson moon shot. It’s important that you be prepared when you take the LSAT and, just as important, that you feel prepared.

So proactive students should start thinking in advance about how much time they’ll need to feel ready on test day. For some people, two months of studying suffices. Others – depending on study habits, learning styles, and schedules – will need more time. If you think two months might not be enough, it’s wise to start studying sooner.

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Logical Reasonings / 6.3.15

A) Above the Law has some sample LSAT questions that will quiz your exam knowledge ahead of test day — and your desire to go to law school.

B) CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE: If that first link makes you question the wisdom of attending law school but doesn’t deter you from becoming a lawyer, here’s how you can do that without a J.D. About Careers

C) CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE: If that first link doesn’t make you question the wisdom of attending law school, here’s how to make an application schedule. Pen and Chisel

D) According to new research, Sonia Sotomayor is the biggest celebrity on the Supreme Court. I call B.S. — there’s no way the Notorious RBG should be fourth. Wall Street Journal

E) Medium just realized that a bunch of 80’s movie villains were right all along — here’s to you Iceman, Mr. Rooney, Judge Reinhold and more.

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Logical Reasonings / 3.23.15

A) “The trouble with studying for the LSAT is you think you have time.” – Wise words from Spivey Consulting

B) One law professor admits that a lawyer doesn’t need law school. But he thinks we still need it so that the law can continue to evolve. Bloomberg View

C) Law school applications have dropped 6.7% this year, and over 50% from ten years ago. Go get ’em, applicants! Wall Street Journal

D) A crazy Austin lawyer did a crazy Austin stunt. Above the Law

E) The Kendrick Lamar-Seinfeld mash up you didn’t know that you were waiting for. Vulture

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How to Maximize Your Time Before the June LSAT

The December LSAT comes right on the heels of the October exam, and the February exam comes right on the heels of the December exam. However, oddly enough, there’s four months on either side of the June exam. It’s also the only exam that’s on a Monday afternoon rather than a Saturday morning. It also happens to be the next exam on the calendar.

Why is this exam different than all other exams?

Who knows? Maybe spring is in the air in Newton, PA, and whatever passes for love at LSAC is along for the ride. Maybe the makers of the LSAT figure you need a few months to recover from Mardi Gras. Maybe they’re burned out themselves and just want to kick it for a while.

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The June LSAT Retake Study Plan

The February LSAT just happened, and you’re already thinking of June. Maybe you took the LSAT and you just know it didn’t go well. Or maybe you decided you weren’t ready to have an LSAT score, so you pulled out at the last minute. Either way, you want to make sure things go better in June. There’s plenty of time between now and then; in fact it’s a dangerous amount of time. If you put off thinking about the June LSAT, it’ll sneak up on you.

It’s therefore important that you plan out how you’ll study for your retake. Plan out a rough schedule; you can always adjust it later.

Start with a break. Get the LSAT off your mind. You’ve been studying hard, and now you need to just back off and let what you’ve done sink in.

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You Bombed the September LSAT… What Now?

We here at Most Strongly Supported hope that all of our readers awaiting a September LSAT score received good news this week. However, sometimes – for whatever reason – a score might fall short of your hopes and expectations. If you are in that unfortunate position, you may be trying to decide what your next steps should be.

This post is for you, my friend.

If your LSAT score wasn’t what you hoped, you may be considering whether to retake the test in December. Here are some factors to keep in mind as you make that decision:

1. When are you applying?

Let’s get one potential objection to retaking out of the way: the December LSAT will still allow you to apply during this admissions cycle.

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For the December LSAT, Planning Ahead Is Key

It may still be October, but I’d like you to flash forward and imagine Sunday, November 30th. It’s the Sunday after Thanksgiving, so you’ll be stuffed with turkey, turducken, tofurkey, or some Frankenstein combination of the three. You’ll have had a few days off of school or work to spend with family and friends.

Sounds nice, doesn’t it? But what if I told you that the December LSAT will be six days away? And, if you’re in school, finals will be impending, too. Imagine feeling like you still have lots of LSAT studying you need to do. Plus, you have a bunch of schoolwork that needs to get done. Now. Or you’ll fail. And your law school applications are lurking in the background. Worst of all, your family is threatening to disown you because you barely even acknowledged them over your plate of tofurkey.

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3 Ways to Refuel After LSAT Burnout

I don’t find Logic Games fun, I don’t think Reading Comprehension passages are interesting, and I don’t enjoy diagramming complicated Logical Reasoning questions.

If you are hitting a wall in your studying right now, or you’re gearing up to retake the LSAT in December and finding it hard to get motivated, I understand those feelings. This post is dedicated to helping you find the mental fortitude to fight through prep fatigue and reach peak performance.

1. Take a Break
Studying for the LSAT is an exhausting process. In the beginning, it is easy to focus—you’re encountering question types for the first time with relatively little stress.

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Logical Reasonings / 10.3.14

The 10-week LSAT prep plan from Blueprint and Ann Levine. Law School Expert

3 more law school study tips. I’ll add a fourth: reading with sunglasses on will really “cool” up your study time. Law School Toolbox

California’s worst-performing law school illustrates the moral hazard of federal student loans. City Journal

The University of Toldeo Law School is lowering tuition to attract more students. Unfortunately still located in Toldeo, though. Toledo Blade

“Pig in Australia Steals 18 Beers from Campers, Gets Drunk, Fights Cow.” BEST. HEADLINE. EVER. Gadling