Tag Archive: september lsat

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September 2017 Post-LSAT Carnival

It’s been a week since the Law School Admissions Council bequeathed the September 2017 LSAT to a nation of lawyers-to-be (unless you live in parts of Florida, in which case, good luck when the exam comes around to you!). And since this momentous bequeathing, the internet has been ablaze with hot takes on the exam. Well, more accurately, a very specific niche of chatty soon-to-be law students have been talking about the exam, mostly trying to figure out which section was the experimental.

But there has been some interesting and lively discussions surrounding the exam on all corners of the internet, so we thought we’d bring back an old favorite — the post-LSAT Carnival — to round up the chatter about the September exam.

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The Morning Cometh: The September 2017 LSAT Recap

On Saturday, what will almost certainly be the largest collection of law school hopefuls to assemble this year woke up to chase their proverbial paper boat of law school dreams down the street, leading them to a storm drain testing center. These law school hopefuls could have lost that paper boat down the storm drain, taken hostage by an evil, shape-shifting clown called the LSIT. Or they could have safely retrieved the boat before it washed down the drain, instead encountering a familiar, less scary, and predictable entity called the LSAT.

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Your September 2017 LSAT Instant Reaction

A big congrats to all those who just completed the September 2017 LSAT from all of us at Blueprint! Now that the exam is over, let this post serve as a safe space for you to unwind and reflect on the exam. So if your speech has not already devolved into a string of champagne and confetti emojis, drop us a comment below to share your experience today. And if you just want to unpack your frustrations after a grueling exam, we’re here for you. We’ll be updating throughout the day.

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You Got This

Tomorrow is the September LSAT. No amount of freaking out will change that, so it’s best to accept it. Here’s why you shouldn’t be too scared.

You’ve come along way. Remember when you started studying? When logic games looked like an alien language? When it seemed like there were so many indicator words for necessary and sufficient conditions and you didn’t know how you’d ever get them all down? Those days are long gone.

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The Last Weekend: How to make it count

It’s here: our last full weekend of LSAT prep. You’re going to make it count. Here’s what you should do.

1. Take a Break?

Some of you have been hitting the LSAT prep very hard lately. If you’re finding that your level of frustration with the LSAT is high or that you’re doing worse on your homework and practice tests this week than normal, you might need a break.

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Should I cancel my September LSAT score?

You have a few days left, but, if you’re considering canceling your September 2016 LSAT score, it’s time to give it serious thought.

Directly below, you will find a timeless classic of Blueprint videography, To Cancel or Not to Cancel, featuring Blueprint founder and certified LSAT-cancelologist, Matt Riley.

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How Did You Do on the September LSAT?

Yesterday was the last major milestone in the circle of September LSAT prep (naaaaants ingonyama bagithi baba): score release day.

After weeks of anxiety, preppers got to experience just a little bit more — one final gift from LSAC — as scores rolled out painfully slowly, amid reports of crashes on the LSAC website. But hopefully the wait was worth it.

The September curve came in at -12 (that’s twelve wrong answers for a score of 170), slightly less generous than the previous two LSAT’s, but still more lenient than the historical average. This makes some amount of sense, as most of what we’ve heard suggests a fairly middle of the road exam: no outrageously difficult or surprising sections, but nothing that could be called a cakewalk, either.

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Balancing Law School Applications and LSAT Prep

As I’m sure many of you are aware, a large number of law school applications become available in September. Those of you gearing up to take the LSAT in a few weeks may be wondering how much time you should dedicate to your application materials versus your LSAT preparation. This post is designed to help shed some light on that issue and help you navigate your way through your application cycle.

First off, I want to make something unequivocally clear: your main priority if you’re taking the September LSAT should be to study. If you’ve reached this point in your preparation, you probably already know that your LSAT score is the single most important aspect of your application. If you’re working full time or if, for any other reason, you can only spend a few hours per day on law school related tasks, then those few hours should be spent on the LSAT.

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Law School Application Season Opens Soon: Are You Ready?

As July comes to a close, we are still a couple months away from law schools opening up the application season. Despite this, potential applicants should start working on their materials now in order to put themselves in the best position to succeed in the coming cycle. This post will specifically address two groups of applicants—first, students who took the June LSAT and are satisfied with their scores and, second, students who are planning on taking the September LSAT.

For both groups, if you haven’t done so already, sign up for the Credential Assembly Service offered through LSAC. Then, begin collecting letters of recommendation and requesting transcripts. Letters of recommendation are, obviously, contingent on recommenders and, as such, they are outside of the applicant’s control. Thus, requesting these letters early on will help make sure that there are no uncontrollable delays in your application.