Tag Archive: study plan

BPPyuko-lsat-blog-flashcards
/ / /

You need to make flashcards for the LSAT, but not many.

The LSAT is a test of reasoning, not memorization. That said, there are some things that you must memorize for the LSAT, and there’s nothing better for memorization than that bit of 1st century BC technology, the flashcard. Here’s a list of things that should make it onto flashcards and into your grey matter:

BPPalex-lsat-blog-balancing
/ / / / /

Balancing Studying for the LSAT with School

The October LSAT about six weeks away. You’ve mastered ordering games and are a pro at linking conditionals. But you’re still trying to get your head around all of the flaw categories and your timing is way off. You’re thinking it’s time to ramp up your study schedule. But there’s also this other item looming on your calendar: school.

Your senior year of college is about to start, and you have a lot of to-dos. You have to get the mini-fridge out of storage, which is a total hassle because Gary will say you can borrow his car but then he’ll totally flake on you all Sunday, and you’ll be like, “What the heck, Gary, my brews are only getting warmer over here.” Then you’ll have to decide whether you’re going to stick with the top-bun you’ve been rocking over the summer. Sure, Gary will give you flak about it, but what does Gary know about style? The guy wears Gap jeans.

/ / /

How to Maximize Your Time Before the June LSAT

The December LSAT comes right on the heels of the October exam, and the February exam comes right on the heels of the December exam. However, oddly enough, there’s four months on either side of the June exam. It’s also the only exam that’s on a Monday afternoon rather than a Saturday morning. It also happens to be the next exam on the calendar.

Why is this exam different than all other exams?

Who knows? Maybe spring is in the air in Newton, PA, and whatever passes for love at LSAC is along for the ride. Maybe the makers of the LSAT figure you need a few months to recover from Mardi Gras. Maybe they’re burned out themselves and just want to kick it for a while.

/ / /

The June LSAT Retake Study Plan

The February LSAT just happened, and you’re already thinking of June. Maybe you took the LSAT and you just know it didn’t go well. Or maybe you decided you weren’t ready to have an LSAT score, so you pulled out at the last minute. Either way, you want to make sure things go better in June. There’s plenty of time between now and then; in fact it’s a dangerous amount of time. If you put off thinking about the June LSAT, it’ll sneak up on you.

It’s therefore important that you plan out how you’ll study for your retake. Plan out a rough schedule; you can always adjust it later.

Start with a break. Get the LSAT off your mind. You’ve been studying hard, and now you need to just back off and let what you’ve done sink in.

/ / / / / /

Strategies for the Last Month Before the February LSAT

<GULP!> Today marks one month—one month!—until the February LSAT. That’s a mere thirty-one days or, for those of you who are particularly obsessive, 744 hours. (Stop looking at the clock on your phone, and, no, I won’t break it into seconds for you.)

However you’re counting down, we’re getting down to the wire, and it’s time to put your game face on, turn on the afterburners, lock and load, etc. Choose whatever metaphor motivates you.

Up until now, you should’ve been slowly and methodically practicing questions and concepts without timing yourself.

/ / / /

LSAT Resolutions for 2015

The New Year is upon us, and, while you should definitely party your brains out tonight (then recover your brains out tomorrow), now is a good time to think about studying for the February LSAT. In addition to resolving to lose weight, finish that novel, hike Everest, and prepare for the zombie apocalypse, here are five resolutions you must make to get a great score on February 7th.

1. Do away with distractions and unnecessary responsibilities.
Everyone wants a slice of your precious time and none of them understand what it’s like to study for the LSAT. Mom wants your help making pot roast and your friend has a place in Cabo this weekend and that damn novel certainly isn’t going to write itself (dammit!). Well, too bad.

BPPgreg-lsat-blog-welcome-february
/ / /

Welcome to the February LSAT

Now that the December LSAT is behind us, the LSAT circle of life continues as we turn our attention to the February LSAT. In fact, here at Blueprint LSAT Prep, many of our winter classes are beginning this week. To our young grasshoppers: welcome to the next couple months of your life! Regardless of what method you’re using for your LSAT prep, if you’re just beginning now, here’s what you should know:

1. Studying for the LSAT is probably a bigger time commitment than you think.
I tell my students that studying for the LSAT is essentially a part-time job unto itself. Once your studying is in full swing, you’ll be spending easily 15 hours a week (and likely more than that) just on studying for the LSAT.

/ / / / /

5 Things to Do Before the December LSAT

It’s almost show time. You’re in the December LSAT’s green room. It may be a less exciting place than a real green room, but regardless, you’ve got to be ready to perform. Here’s what you should do this week. (Stay tuned to the blog tomorrow for a post about what you shouldn’t do this week. We got you covered.)

Do a targeted review of the areas you still have trouble with.
The LSAT is a test of skills. You can’t cram for it. But you can and should brush up on your weaker areas a little, and do some targeted practice. This is especially true if you find that your accuracy has slipped in a particular area. Try to get it back. Review with an eye towards refining your approach to the questions, and try to solidify your understanding of exactly why the answers are right or wrong.