Tag Archive: Studying

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Speed up!

There is a lot to learn for the LSAT, from diagramming conditionals, to memorizing flaw categories, to wrangling with combo games. The December LSAT is fast approaching, and hopefully students taking the test next month will be familiar with most of the material at this point.

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How to Interpret Your PE 2 Results

After many long, cold nights spent staring at your textbooks, if you’re a student in the Blueprint LSAT Prep live course, you probably are taking your second practice exam right around now. You’re probably expecting to see a pretty significant improvement – after all, you’ve been busting your tail for more than a month, so now it’s time to see that sweet, sweet payoff. Right?!

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The LSAT is Coming…dun dun dun

We’re just a few months away from the October LSAT, which means that our courses are ABOUT TO GO DOWN. If you’ve made the (right) decision to sign up with us, we’ve listed some tips to help you get the most out of your course and also some vital life-saving tips that’ll prevent you from totally sh*tting on yourself on that first day. We get it. It happens.

First, a bit about myself. Two years ago, I was gearing up to take an LSAT prep class with Blueprint. I was lucky enough to have Matt Riley as my instructor (he’s one of the founders of Blueprint—he is a fantastic teacher and a great guy). After completing the class and taking the LSAT, I landed a job as an instructor for Blueprint. I taught for a little while before accepting an offer of admission from Columbia. I am now gearing up to begin my second year there! All of that to say, I know the Blueprint course method from both the perspective of a student and the perspective of an instructor. Consider yourself a lucky reader.

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Keep Calm and Study On

There are three weeks left until the LSAT. What’s the best plan of action?

A) Spend all your time studying, with breaks to go to the bathroom (two minutes max), sleep (two hours max), take showers (two a week max), and answer the door for the smoothie delivery guy (no solids—remember the bathroom rule).
B) Do practice tests, wonder why you’re not making as much progress as you should be, wail about how the world will be over to anyone who will listen, and pull a Chicken Little and send a series of tweets to LSAC demanding the LSAT be canceled, because there won’t be any test centers around anyway. #theendisnigh
C) Party, go to the beach, Netflix all day and night. You’ve already learned all you’re going to learn anyway. What will come will come. Who are you to fight fate?

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Logical Reasonings / 4.28.15

A) How to get the most out of your finals studying — law school or not. Above the Law

B) Here’s what you don’t learn during 1L at law school. (Or at least a small sampling… I imagine there’s not much about microbiology or fire-eating, either.) Ms. JD

C) What are the legal issues in the tragic death of Freddie Gray, which has led to rioting in Baltimore? Glad you asked. CNN

D) SCOTUS heard arguments in the latest gay marriage case today, and seemed divided along partisan lines (no surprise). New York Times

E) Escape the weight of the world with the office minutes from the Last Supper. McSweeney’s

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My First LSAT: Cut Through the B.S.

From time to time, we ask a Blueprint instructor to reflect on his or her experiences studying for the LSAT. Today we welcome Robert Seaney of New York. To read past installments, click here.

Everyone’s approach to the LSAT is going to be a little bit different. When I began my studies, I was told that you just have to figure out which is the experimental section (good luck…), and spend that 35 minute segment sneakily going back to answer the scored questions. I was told by others that Reading Comprehension is specifically designed to be completable only for those who know how to speed-read; a two-time 180 scorer told me that the key is in meditation; and a dubious gentleman studying at Florida Coastal insisted that you really don’t even need to study.

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Logical Reasonings / 3.23.15

A) “The trouble with studying for the LSAT is you think you have time.” – Wise words from Spivey Consulting

B) One law professor admits that a lawyer doesn’t need law school. But he thinks we still need it so that the law can continue to evolve. Bloomberg View

C) Law school applications have dropped 6.7% this year, and over 50% from ten years ago. Go get ’em, applicants! Wall Street Journal

D) A crazy Austin lawyer did a crazy Austin stunt. Above the Law

E) The Kendrick Lamar-Seinfeld mash up you didn’t know that you were waiting for. Vulture

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Studying While You’re “Sick”

Drinking green beer is always regrettable. Green vomit is even worse. If you partook in yesterday’s emerald festivities, there’s a good chance you’re not feeling your best today. Let’s take this chance to discuss studying for the LSAT when you’re “under the weather.”

It may be hard to believe right now, but this morning’s misery will pass. Save the LSAT studying for when you don’t have a pounding headache and a stomach that feels like it’s in full-blown rebellion against every other organ in your body.

The same goes for other brief illnesses. You’ll learn better when you can really focus on what you’re doing. So it’s just fine to give yourself a little break and take time to get yourself better. Once the worst is over, get back to studying hard.

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Why the LSAT is a Terrible Valentine

It’s brainy, articulate, and financially successful, but don’t be fooled — the LSAT is a crappy valentine. So, though Valentine’s Day be a product of the Hallmark corporation that no one really enjoys, it’s still probably better to spend it with an actual human being than your LSAT studies.

Don’t believe us? Here are a few reasons why the LSAT will make a subpar date on February 14th.

1. The LSAT won’t make you feel pretty
At the start of your date, the LSAT will ask to see your photo ID and a horribly bland recent passport photo of you.

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How to Distract Yourself from the LSAT

Tomorrow is the LSAT – the culmination of months of preparation. While you should probably pick out a few questions to warm up with tomorrow morning, your studying is over. Or at least, it should be over.

There’s not much to be gained from cramming in a practice test today, especially if you haven’t given your brain a break in a while. Like muscles that day need time to recover after an intensive workout, you need to take a mental break. Not only will it feel good to distract yourself from the test for a few hours, but your brain will likely be subconsciously processing all of your past studying. That’s right, taking a day off will actually help you better understand the LSAT.

But what to do if Logic Games won’t stop running through your head? Or you can’t help but tag every article in People for author’s intent? We’re here to help.