Tag Archive: timing

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On Confidence and Time Pressure

The Law School Admissions Test would, of course, be substantially easier if it didn’t impose time limits. Without them, test-takers could mull over RC passages, LR stimuli, and LG intros to their hearts’ content, and debate every answer choice at length. The perceived pressure of the whole testing ordeal would abate considerably, and virtually everyone would be likely to score markedly higher in the end.

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Speeding Up on Logic Games

Recently, we went over how to get faster on the Reading Comp section of the LSAT. Now, it’s time to go over Logic Games. Finishing the Games section in time was my biggest struggle when I first took the LSAT, but you can improve your speed on the games section greatly. Here are some tips:

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Speeding Up on Reading Comp

It’s hard to finish LSAT sections in time, and for many people Reading Comp is the toughest section to get through. You have to read the passages, which can take a while, and then if you’re not sure what you’re doing on the questions you can easily end up reading whole chunks of the passage again and then the time just slips and before you know it it’s the five minute warning and how many questions are left? Oh crap, and you start to try to go faster but nothing makes sense anymore and then they call time.

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Mastering the Final Stage of Your LSAT Studies

You’ve spent months slaving over Flaw and Sufficient Assumption questions. You’re having dreams about diagramming and taking the contrapositive of conditional statements. You’ve pilgrimaged to the top of the tallest mountain and communed with the wise man to find out when to use scenarios in Logic Games. Now you’re in the home stretch of your studying, and you’re wondering how to proceed.

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From the Vaults: How to Improve Your LSAT Speed and Endurance

With two weeks and change before the February LSAT, it’s tempting to think that there’s no room for improvement. (Maybe not tempting, but nearly unavoidable.) However, the vast majority of studiers can still improve – even in the week before the test.

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Ack! It’s the February LSAT! RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!!

The February LSAT is coming up. Fast. If next Saturday’s test is in your plans, it’s time for you to take lots of LSAT practice tests and work on your plan for game day. Here are some principles to keep in mind.

Not every question is equal.

It’s tempting to divide the 35 minutes you have for each section by the number of questions in that section to figure out how long you have for each question. If you’re shooting to do every question (more on that later), you’ll get an accurate average time, but it’s just that: an average. Nothing more.

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Timing & Endurance, the Final LSAT Frontier(s)

The September LSAT is a few weeks away, and it’s time to start thinking seriously about timing and section strategy. Most Blueprint courses are wrapping up the new material around now. It’s time to review a bit and shift your focus to the big picture. Here are some tips: Start by reviewing any problem areas.

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The LSAT rubber meets the road.

I taught Lesson 13 to one set of students last night and will teach that same lesson to another set of students the day after tomorrow. In Blueprint world, that’s where we reach the end of new subject matter, and the rest of the course is devoted to shoring up understanding of that subject matter and the nuts and bolts of taking the test.

This period of transition is important, but it’s also jarring. No less important is the fact that it occurs each class very close to test day. To wit, at the time this post was written, there were twenty six days left until the September exam. So, here’s a brief rundown of what you ought to do: