Tag Archive: timing

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Timing & Endurance, the Final LSAT Frontier(s)

The September LSAT is a few weeks away, and it’s time to start thinking seriously about timing and section strategy. Most Blueprint courses are wrapping up the new material around now. It’s time to review a bit and shift your focus to the big picture. Here are some tips: Start by reviewing any problem areas.

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The LSAT rubber meets the road.

I taught Lesson 13 to one set of students last night and will teach that same lesson to another set of students the day after tomorrow. In Blueprint world, that’s where we reach the end of new subject matter, and the rest of the course is devoted to shoring up understanding of that subject matter and the nuts and bolts of taking the test.

This period of transition is important, but it’s also jarring. No less important is the fact that it occurs each class very close to test day. To wit, at the time this post was written, there were twenty six days left until the September exam. So, here’s a brief rundown of what you ought to do:

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Slow down there, LSAT student!

At the beginning of Blueprint LSAT Prep’s courses, many students are understandably more than a little anxious about timing. There are a whole lot of questions on that sucker; how will they ever be able to get through them all?! And, to be honest, that anxiety will likely continue for a large portion of the course. That said, it’s a bad idea to stress about how quickly you’re getting through questions during the first half (or so) of your course, and here’s why.

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Your Final Weeks of Study, Logic Games Edition

A couple days ago, we covered how to work on Reading Comprehension as you shift from learning the basics to reviewing and working on timing. Yesterday, we took a look at Logical Reasoning. So, you guessed it, today’s all about those games.

The first step is similar: identify your weaknesses and address them. If there are any types of games that you just don’t feel comfortable with, now’s your time to go over them.

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The Logic of Skipping a Game

As the song goes, “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em and know when to fold ’em.” In a perfect world, you’d be able to finish all four Logic Games in a section within the given time, but sometimes that’s just not in the cards.

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5 Quick Tips to Supercharge Your Logical Reasoning Performance

During my time writing for this blog, I’ve repeatedly vented about my hatred for logic games. Fortunately for everyone, I won’t be talking about logic games this week; instead, I get to talk about a section that is near and dear to my heart — logical reasoning — and the dead horse that is my vendetta against logic games will get at least a weeklong reprieve. Without further adieu, here are my five quick tips for upping your logical reasoning score.

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The Rules for Logic Games Rules

There are just ten days left until the February LSAT, and at this point your methods for tackling Logic Games are pretty much settled. However, there’s still time to improve your speed on this all-important section.

As you know, one of the first steps when starting a Logic Game is to visually represent each rule so that you don’t have to keep re-reading the text.

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Skip smart on LR.

With the February exam so painfully close – ack! – you should now be doing a whole lot of time-pressure practice. But just hurrying isn’t going to get you where you need to be. You have to hurry in a smart fashion.

When I was studying for the LSAT back before the wheel was invented (yes, the crusty psychometricians at LSAC are older than time itself, and so am I), I found myself hitting a ceiling. That ceiling was 168.

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Speed up!

There is a lot to learn for the LSAT, from diagramming conditionals, to memorizing flaw categories, to wrangling with combo games. The December LSAT is fast approaching, and hopefully students taking the test next month will be familiar with most of the material at this point.

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Work More Efficiently, Not Faster

If you’re taking the June LSAT, you’re probably concerned about timing. That’s normal. And here’s some good news: even in the next couple weeks until the LSAT, there’s time to improve.

Imagine this: you have to drive somewhere unfamiliar. There’s traffic. You don’t want to be late. Would you run to the car, say, “I don’t know exactly where it is, but I know it’s vaguely north of here,” and then drive north as fast as you can? You might not know where you’re going, but you’ll screech those tires around corners and gun it from every stoplight, even if you end up stuck in traffic a few seconds later. Or would you check traffic, plot a route that avoids it, and drive a little more sensibly?