Tag Archive: video

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Is the LSAT Harder Than the SAT? (Video)

If you just look at the acronyms — SAT and LSAT — you will come to the (absolutely trivial) conclusion that these two exams are 75% alike. Just slap an “L” on the front, and you’ve got the SAT. So is the LSAT just a lawyer-y version of the SAT? Do you need to know how to find the hypotenuse of a lawyer triangle? Do you have to determine whether the rules of grammar are being violated in a legal brief? Must you memorize the definition of legal terms such as “consideration” or “restitution?”

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What’s the best major for the LSAT? (Video)

If you’ve done a little bit of nosing into the idea of going to law school – and chances are that, if you’re reading this blog right now (and you are reading this blog right now, just to be clear) you have – you’ve likely found out that there’s no required major or minor or even courses you must have taken to go to law school. Unlike med school where you need to do pre-med and take inscrutable things like organic chemistry and physiology, whatever those are, law schools’ mission is to take absolute beginners and turn them into lawyers in three years.

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How long do I study? (Video, babies, video.)

How should you spend your time? That’s a very broad question. All things being equal, we’d recommend putting in the 10,000 or so hours necessary to master the oboe. Oh, no oboe for you? Fair enough. Not many people drop by Most Strongly Supported to talk unpopular woodwind instruments.

No, instead, they drop by to talk about the LSAT and law school. Regarding the former concern, one of the most common questions we get is, “How long should I study for the LSAT?” Like most other things in life, there’s no one-size-fits-all-answer.

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Why I Used An Online LSAT Prep Course

With our Online Course Sale in full swing, I thought I’d take a second to talk about why I used it when I took the LSAT.

It wasn’t (only) because I’m a Blueprint employee/internet czar. The main reason I took Blueprint’s online course is because I work all day, and the 8½ hour chunks my job takes out of my life limited how much time I could commit to my studies. I’m also pretty active outside of work – I write every day, have a couple of hobbies, and even enjoy sitting on my couch doing nothing every once in a while – which further restricted my study hours. In addition to taking up time in a general sense, all of that stuff limited the exact blocks of time I could devote to studying. I knew I could allot at least 10 hours per week to the LSAT, but I couldn’t guarantee that it was the same 10 hours every week.