How many practice exams should I take? (Video)

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There is a finite amount of time that one can spend studying for the LSAT. There is also a finite, albeit large and getting larger, number of exams that have been released. A common question we instructors get asked is: How many practice exams should I take?

This is usually asked by a student with great anxiety about the test, and with specific anxiety about the inarguably difficult time constraints on the test. Four Reading Comp passages and 27 questions in 35 minutes? What are you, crazy?? The theory that these students operate on is that, if they take practice exam after practice exam after practice exam, that intense training will get them where they want to be.

Because of the prevalence of this question, and the fact that many instructors have had to talk students down from taking four or five (or more) full practice exams a week, we’ve crafted a useful little two minute video that gives you the rundown on how many practice exams you should take and what else you should be doing with your limited time and resources that will get you to the score you want on test day.

Sam Fox, veteran Blueprint LSAT instructor and star of numerous Blueprint videos, will answer the question posed in the title of this post. Without giving too much away, Mr. Fox will give you a definitive number of practice exams to take. (Spoiler alert: It’s probably far less than you think.) However, and more importantly, he will give you an overview of the other things that will be more effective in getting yourself over the timing hump, and that’s actionable intel that you can use a scant two minutes from now. (Spoiler alert #2: These other tasks are far less brutal and unpleasant than taking a full practice exam under time pressure.)

So, without further ado, here is Sam Fox with sage advice on the role of taking practice exams in your studies:



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