Logical Reasonings / 9.19.18

A. A survey asked almost 25,000 undergads and 1Ls what they thought about law school. And many said it’s too long, too expensive, and doesn’t focus enough on the actual work of attorneys. Maybe law schools will listen? As they say, 25,000 freshmen can’t be wrong. Above the Law

B. A former University of New Hampshire law student is suing the school for $5.3 million. He alleges that after he withdrew from the school following a code of conduct violation, the school gave him a Catch-22-style method of resolving the code violation: he could request a hearing to investigate the handling of his the code violation, but only after he re-enrolled in the school … which the school forbade him from doing, because of the outstanding code violation. Law360

C. More results from state bar exams, but these are a little less dreary. Mississippi’s bar passage rate was 58.8% for the July 2018 exam. That doesn’t sound great, but only until you learn that they had a 36% passage rate in February 2017. Mississippi Litigation Review

D. On a more positive tip, here’s a podcast on how to say happy and balanced in law school. ABA Journal

E. A Yale grad student railed against the Yale Law School for being number one in both the USNWR rankings and the producing-Supreme-Court-nominees-with-serious-sexual-misconduct-allegations rankings. Above the Law

Logical Reasonings / 9.18.18

A. Some rascals at Michigan Law have created an Onion-style parody of law school called Ipse Dixit. Ipse Dixit

B. Continuing from yesterday’s pretty abysmal MBE score results, today brings pretty bad news regarding the Florida bar exam. Law.com

C. Here’s a taxonomic rundown of the type of students you’ll encounter in law school classes. Above the Law

D. The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a public hearing with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexual assault, Christine Blasey Ford. Washington Post

E. Anita Hill, who testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee regarding sexual harassment twenty-seven years before Ford will — and was subjected to a particularly brutal smear campaign — wrote an op-ed in the Times on how the Senate Judiciary Committee can get the investigation right this time. NY Times

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Does Raising Tuition Increase Enrollments for Law Schools?

No prospective law student likes how expensive law school is. A lot of people take on tons and tons of debt to go to school. Then, when they graduate, the pressure is on those lawyers to chart a career path that lets them have a chance at getting out from under that debt. For graduates of lower-tier schools with lots of debt, it’s often hard to find such a career path.

Logical Reasonings / 9.17.18

A. USNWR has some thoughts on the predictive success of online LSAT/GPA calculators. Pro tip: we have a pretty good one that you can use for free. U.S. News & World Report

B. And if you want to know where famous attorneys went to law school and where those schools are ranked, USNWR has a slideshow on that too. U.S. News & World Report

C. Scores from the July 2018 Multistate Bar Exam — the multiple-choice section of the bar exam that is a part of nearly every state’s exam — are in and they are not pretty. Above the Law

D. Maybe the Law & Corpus Linguistics project, which was just unveiled today and can help users translate and understand the text of founding federal documents, will help bring law students understand Con Law, and bring those scores up in the future. Law & Corpus Linguistics

E. There was a lot of news about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh over the weekend. Here’s a helpful explainer on the nomination from the inveterate explainers at Vox. Vox

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Getting to Yes on the LSAT

Before you start law school, the one book everyone will tell you to read is Getting to Maybe. As its subtitle How to Excel on Law School Exams might suggest, it’s a tract on how to excel on law school exams. Its essential thesis is that up to law school, most exams lavishly award students who can identify the “right” answer. But a law school exam — in which complex fact patterns are devised with no clear “right” answer, requiring students to apply legal analysis to both sides of an issue — is a different beast that requires a different approach. The book describes how to live and thrive in this land of “maybe” in which law school exams exist.