Jacqueline Uranga

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January 2019 Post-LSAT Carnival

With the January LSAT behind us, it’s time for another LSAT Carnival to round up the online forum discussions about the exam. As with every LSAT in the history of Reddit, students with nothing to do but wait for their scores took to their laptops to analyze or simply vent about their experience.

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Last Week Before the January 2019 LSAT Checklist

For January 2019 LSAT-takers, there are roughly 168 hours (that’s one week) standing between you and your dream score. With so much to keep in your brain until exam day, I want to relieve you of some of the effort of figuring out everything you have left to do in your last week before the exam. There are some things you absolutely need to do before you can take the exam, and there are a few more things that I highly recommend that you do in your last week in order to give yourself the best preparation for the LSAT.

This is my checklist of all of those things you should do in your week before the LSAT:

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January LSAT Deadlines Are Here

The January 2019 LSAT is just a couple weeks away, which also means that the deadlines to change or get out of this exam have arrived. Students signed up for the January LSAT have until today, January 11 at 11:59 pm Eastern Time, to change the test location or postpone the LSAT to another date (both requiring you to pay an extra $125). And today is also the deadline to withdraw from the LSAT altogether for a refund of $50.

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Dispatches from Law School: Stressing Finals Week

Since my first semester of law school recently ended, I’m ready to share the experience with the LSAT students who may be curious about what is probably the most notorious part of law school: finals. I’ll give you my best description of the finals period first, and then tell you a story that will give a real sense of how it feels to be in the thick of law school finals.

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What to Expect When You’re Expecting Your LSAT Score to Be Released

Based on all available information, the November 2018 LSAT scores will be released tomorrow, Saturday, 12/8! The LSAC has burned students before when LSAC gave a certain release date and then changed it, but it seems extremely likely for November LSAT takers that the icons on your account page of the LSAC site will change from green to grey around midnight tonight (depending on your time zone), followed by score releases beginning Saturday morning.

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Dispatches from Law School: Preparing for Finals

If law school is in your future, *this* is the period in law school you’ll hear horror stories about (you’ll have to camp out in the library just to keep up with your classes, you’ll become the worst possible version of yourself, etc., etc.) Here’s the reality (from the perspective of one law student).

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You Got This

Hey you — yes, you about to take the LSAT. Know that you got this and that you’re already an exceptional person going into this exam. Here’s why:

When you chose to go to law school, you set yourself up to be among a relatively small and ambitious group of people who aren’t afraid to work hard and commit to their education for the sake of accomplishing truly worthy goals.

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Your Guide to the Updated 2019 LSAT Schedule

There’s a brave new world of LSAT opportunities for those students planning to take the test in 2019. Not only are students choosing among seven test dates, but they also have the option of taking the exam multiple times and (potentially) in different formats.

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Dispatches from Law School: Meeting the “Gunner”

Despite the warnings I heard before law school, the great majority of law students I’ve met are thoughtful, interesting and supportive people. The “gunner” stereotype of a law student is essentially the opposite: a self-important student who sits at the front of every class, takes up class time with their own philosophizing on the law, and ensures that everybody knows just how much they’re studying. My experience has been that the “gunner” rarely exists in its full form, but you do see different pieces of the gunner personality in people you meet in law school.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

We’re getting into the last month before another LSAT, and that means practice tests are absolutely essential to folks preparing for the exam. Any student who’s taken a practice test is familiar with the unnerving process of calculating your own practice exam score. However, the LSAT practice exams are not like online quizzes where you inevitably find out that you would be a Hufflepuff in Harry Potter, and then move on with your day. Scoring is really just the first step in reviewing a practice exam if you want to reap the greatest benefit from your practice.