Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Seeing the Big Picture on Comparative Passages

Comparative Reading Comprehension passages are the baby of the LSAT, having been added to the test in 2007 (practically a blink of an eye for an organization that takes a month to score a Scantron). As the name would suggest, the questions focus on comparing the two passages: Which of these is supported by one passage but not the other? Which is something that both authors have in common? And so on.

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Having trouble with Sufficient and Necessary Qs? Try looking out for new info

Sufficient and necessary assumption questions are asking about two very different types of assumptions, but both question types have something in common: The conclusion almost always introduces new information, and finding the correct answer requires identifying and handling that new information appropriately. Sufficient Assumptions Almost all sufficient assumption questions have new information in the conclusion

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RSVP to Our Two Upcoming Webinars!

The beginning of November always brings to light one of the most important debates in American culture: When does the holiday season actually begin? Is it after Halloween (no), or does the season not truly start until after Thanksgiving (yes)?

Okay, so it’s not really a debate, because the people who start putting up holiday decorations right after Halloween are flat-out wrong. And, similarly, there’s no debate over whether our upcoming free web seminars will be helpful to all the pre-law hopefuls out there!

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These Spooky Logic Games Are More Trick than Treat

Halloween Week continues here at Ghost Strongly Supported (speaking of which, have you entered our costume/pumpkin-carving contest yet??) with something truly spooky — we’ve got a super special set of Logic Games for you, hot and fresh out the proverbial kitchen.

We cooked up these games ourselves at Blueprint, using real LSAT logic games as an inspiration. If you’re truly stumped, we’ve provided some quick tips below to help you find deductions, but you should attempt the games on your own before checking out those hints.

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Should I re-do Logic Games?

There is a surprisingly broad range of opinions when it comes to the question of re-doing Logic Games. I find that many students assume their time is better spent working on material they’ve never seen before, instead of repeating games they’ve already tried. Meanwhile, some LSAT tutors advocate re-doing games as many as 10 times to glean the maximum amount of knowledge from them. I’d argue that the truth, as is often the case, lies somewhere in the middle.

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All the amazing ways the common fallacies can help you

Earlier this week, we gave you a rundown on some of the most common fallacies on the LSAT. It is, of course, helpful to understand those fallacies for Flaw questions in the Logical Reasoning section. However, familiarity with common flaws also helps you in other sections of the LSAT.

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

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If you diagram, you should look for deductions

We’ve spilled a lot of ink on this blog about how to diagram conditional statements, but you may be wondering why you should even bother acquiring this skill — what good is being able to diagram, anyway??

The answer, of course, is that it helps you understand what conclusions can validly be drawn from a set of information. Today we’ll discuss the types of valid inferences that can be made from conditional statements — and stay tuned next week, when we’ll circle back to talk about what LSAT question types most often require diagramming.

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Minimizing Nerves and Building Confidence for Test Day

One of the challenges of taking the LSAT is that, of course, test day feels like a high-stakes situation — you’ve been preparing for months, and you feel like you only have one shot to get it right. You probably can’t totally avoid test day nerves unless you’re some kind of LSAT-taking robot, but there are some ways to minimize them; furthermore, there are ways to encourage confidence, which is the LSAT secret sauce. Here’s the skinny on each.