Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Three Last-Minute July LSAT Tips

With the July LSAT just a few days away, you should be using your remaining study time to fine-tune your approach. Hopefully by now you’ve nailed down your basic strategy for each section, but here are a few last-minute tips to help you grab an extra point or two.

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An Easy Guide to Quantified Logic

If you’ve been studying for the LSAT for a while, you’re well acquainted with combining “all” statements, such as, “All fast food burgers are unhealthy,” or, “Doing well on the LSAT requires sacrificing your social life.” And to be honest, as long as you’re proficient with those types of statements, you’ll be A-OK on the LSAT.

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What to Do the Day Before Test Day

Finally, after months of breathless anticipation and/or looming dread, it’s almost here — the big day. Of course, we’re referring the day before your LSAT.

It will be a momentous day — one that, in the future, you’ll remember as the day before you crushed the LSAT. Here’s how to spend it in order to achieve maximum crushing the test the following day.

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Speeding Up with Conditional Statements

Figuring out timing on the LSAT can feel impossible — you might wonder how you’ll ever be able to get through a whole section, let alone devote time to those “extra” steps like anticipating the right answer or diagramming. The catch-22, of course, is that taking the time for those extra steps is necessary (see what we did there?) for getting through a section with adequate time — if you skip them, you’re more likely to waste time and be tempted by wrong answers.

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One Month to Go Before the March LSAT

There’s just about a month to go until the March LSAT, and although that might sound like a terrifying proposition, a month is actually an eternity in LSAT time. No, not because time seems to stand still when you’re doing LSAT questions (or at least, not only for that reason) — but because a month allows you plenty of time to make significant improvements in your LSAT score, as long as you’re using your time wisely. Here’s how to use that final month to ace your LSAT.

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You Didn’t Get The Score You Wanted. Now What?

January LSAT scores were released today, which means that after weeks of impatient waiting and hours of frantic email-refreshing, January test-takers have finally met their fates. Every time LSAC releases LSAT scores, recipients fall roughly into one of three camps:

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A Guide to Studying for the LSAT Without a Class

They say that one of the keys to success in this world is knowing yourself, and if there’s anything I know for sure about myself, it’s that I am the literal worst at managing big, unstructured projects. In my senior year, I had to write a thesis, for which I had to read an entire novel written in Spanish, plus supplementary materials, and write a paper that was about 40 pages long (luckily, in English). I had the entire year to complete these tasks, but instead of managing my time appropriately and working on it steadily throughout the year, I waited ’til about a month before it was due, panicked, and then had to frantically finish the book and write the last 30-odd pages in a stress-induced blackout.

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Will the Digital LSAT Change Law School Admissions?

To put it politely, the legal industry is not exactly known for its rapid adaptation to change. In light of that fact, with the recent changes to the LSAT — the shift to a digital format and the addition of twice as many testing dates per year — there are seismic shifts happening in the prelaw world this year.

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The LSAT Bird Box Challenge

Because we the people love nothing more than a stupid, unnecessary, and potentially dangerous challenge, the nation has been swept by the Bird Box challenge, in which — inspired by the eponymous movie starring Sandy B. — people blindfold themselves and then attempt to do normal daily tasks, such as walking down the street or using the subway.