Laura Santoski

Laura is a former Blueprint LSAT Prep student who we could never quite get rid of. After scoring a 178 on the October 2011 LSAT, she taught and tutored Blueprint's students in Boston for three years (while developing a healthy appreciation for Dunks and lobster rolls). She now writes financial reports by day and LSAT blog posts by night.

Laura's favorite section of the LSAT is Logical Reasoning because each question is like a mini-puzzle (if you're taking a very charitable view). When writing for the blog, though, she particularly enjoys demystifying the Reading Comprehension section -- contrary to popular belief, it is learnable and there is a strategic way to approach it! Laura's favorite part of teaching and tutoring has been meeting a broad range of really cool people. (Plus she got some funny-embarrassing stories out of teaching all those classes, so that's a perk too.)

When she's not reading MSS, Laura browses a strange assortment of blogs, including Ask a Manager and Captain Awkward (whose matter-of-fact and direct style she hopes to attain). She also has the New York Times as her browser's homepage, and sometimes even reads the articles she sees on it.

Author Archive:

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Choosing the Right Path on Those Tricky Profiling Games

For most logic games on the LSAT, it’s pretty clear how you should be setting up your game. If Little Jimmy is going to eat six bowls of cereal and you’re figuring out what order he eats ’em in, you draw six spots on your paper and fill them in. If you’re figuring out who’s on the varsity volleyball team and who only made JV, your groups are the two teams, and then you figure out who was lucky and who wasn’t.

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The Many Instances of Examples on Reading Comp

When it comes to the Reading Comprehension section on the LSAT, my eternal refrain is that the best success is achieved by focusing primarily on the structure of a passage, with the content of the passage as a secondary concern. (In fact, I’m working on boiling that phrase down for use as a catchy statement on my tombstone.)

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RSVP to Our Webinar: “Everything You Need to Know About the July LSAT”

For the first time ever, there will be an LSAT administered in July 2018. This test administration has been shrouded in mystery. What time will it start? Will the test be released? How should I adjust my study schedule for it? If I want to retake after the June LSAT, will I still have time to sign up for the July test?

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Breaking Down Arguments Like a Pro

Studying for the LSAT is a difficult and time-consuming pursuit. For one thing, it takes a long time to build familiarity with the way the test is set up. Furthermore, unlike most of the tests people have experienced their academic careers, the LSAT tests skills, not knowledge — so you can’t rote-memorize your way to a good LSAT score.

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Getting Your Study Game Right for the LSAT

If there’s one thing pre-law students have down pat, it’s studying. You don’t decide to go to law school unless you have certain tendencies, and those specific tendencies often correlate with the types of traits that lead a student to, say, take on an extra research project or start an essay — gasp — the week before it’s due instead of the night before it’s due. Basically, pre-law students tend to be pretty damn good at studying.

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Understanding Your LSAT Score: The “Curve,” Explained

In a surprise move, LSAT scores were released late last night (so much for day-old promises, LSAC), which means a bunch of LSAT students have a shiny new LSAT score. You’ll hopefully hear lots of score recipients gushing about their scores, and you’ll probably hear some folks who are bummed out as well (we’ll have a post for those guys in the next couple days).

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Heads Up! We’ll Be Hosting Two More Webinars on Thursday, March 15th!

Top o’ the morning to you! It’s finally March, the month of unseasonably late snowstorms (at least for those of us in the Northeast), busted brackets, and drunks stumbling around the city wearing green on St. Paddy’s Day. It’s also the time of year when a crop of new students begins to think somewhat abstractly about the LSAT looming in their future, or perhaps the law school applications they’ll have to submit in the upcoming fall.

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Should you take the June or July LSAT?

As previously announced, LSAC is finally falling more in line with other graduate school exams and is adding additional test dates — instead of only being given four opportunities per year to take the LSAT, future test-takers will have up to six chances per year. This year, test-takers in North America have the option to take the test on June 11 — as was the case in previous years — or on July 23, which will be the first time the test has been offered in July.