Category Archive: General LSAT Advice

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Breaking Down LSAT Questions: the Three Sections

If you’re reading this blog, congratulations on deciding to take the LSAT! Say goodbye to your peace of mind and social life, and get mentally prepared to spend a few months gaming the LSAT format to squeeze every available second out of your LSAT test questions. Many things about the LSAT are changing (we’re still recovering from the bombshell that the LSAT is going digital), but the typical LSAT question on each of the three sections remains largely the same. For the uninitiated, here’s a complete LSAT sections breakdown.

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The Best Free Tools to Help with Your LSAT Prep

As much as we like to encourage and motivate you on your journey to law school, LSAT prep is hard and requires a major commitment. Stop me when I lie. How long should you study for the LSAT? The average student should study for at least two months at 20 hours per week. Plus, you [eventually] have to pay the application fees when you apply to law school, on top of the LSAT registration fee (plural, if you take it more than once). But before you go up to the top and close this tab because the truth hurts, continue reading to discover some great and free tools to make your studying so much more manageable.

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Battle LSAT Anxiety with Your Brain (and Butt)

Test anxiety is real, and the LSAT brings about an entire cornucopia of emotions. It’s understandable; you’ve spent months preparing for this test that will determine where you spend the next few years of year life and possibly even who will hire you after graduation. Plus, you really don’t want to retake the LSAT and go through that endeavor all over again (but you might have to).  Walking into your test room as prepared as possible is one way to deal with LSAT test anxiety, but there are other techniques to keep you cool, calm, and collected before, during, and after the LSAT.

For today’s post we brought in recently licensed marriage and family therapist Megan Riley to share her thoughts on controlling test day anxiety.

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You Didn’t Get The Score You Wanted. Now What?

January LSAT scores were released today, which means that after weeks of impatient waiting and hours of frantic email-refreshing, January test-takers have finally met their fates. Every time LSAC releases LSAT scores, recipients fall roughly into one of three camps:

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Top 5 Things You Need to Know About the Digital LSAT

After years of “will they/won’t they,” LSAC has finally decided to enter the 21st century and move away from the paper-and-pencil LSAT beginning in July 2019. We can grumble, we can complain, we can blame Gen Z, but love it or not, the LSAT digital revolution is coming. LSAC has been slowly releasing information bit by bit, and although we’ve diligently reported all the latest developments, it can still be a lot to digest at once. So, we’ve determined the top five things you need to know about the digital LSAT, regardless if you’re a seasoned LSAT vet or you’re taking the test for the first time this year.

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The LSAT Bird Box Challenge

Because we the people love nothing more than a stupid, unnecessary, and potentially dangerous challenge, the nation has been swept by the Bird Box challenge, in which — inspired by the eponymous movie starring Sandy B. — people blindfold themselves and then attempt to do normal daily tasks, such as walking down the street or using the subway.

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3 Small LSAT-Resolutions for the New Year

Earlier this week, we discussed some resolutions to help you improve your LSAT score, become fabulously wealthy, find a girl/boyfriend, and generally improve your life (non-LSAT results not guaranteed). But there are some other, smaller habits you can implement in 2019 that will help with your LSAT studying, though they won’t help so much with those other things. If you’re studying for the LSAT this year, here are some things you should consider doing:

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3 Resolutions for Pre-Law Students

There’s no doubt that 2018 was a weird year. From a student suing law schools for forcing them to take the LSAT to the proposed creation of a U.S. Space Force. However at the stroke of midnight last night, we ushered in 2019 with a flurry of fireworks and champagne bubbles, so you know what that means: new year, new YOU! If you didn’t reach your top LSAT score last year, 2019 brings nine chances. To help motivate you, we’ve come up with three resolutions for the new year that will make your studying a little easier, and, the best part is, you only have to keep these resolutions until you take the LSAT (unless you find that your life has vastly improved because of them).