Category Archive: General LSAT Advice

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Learn About the Digital LSAT at Blueprint’s New Seminars

After LSAC made the rather small announcement earlier this year about transitioning the LSAT to a digital exam beginning in July 2019, questions have swirled around the changes: which test centers will have the digital LSAT, will all the LSATs be on tablets, can you choose if you want to take the LSAT on a tablet or on paper…etc. Students have also raised concerns about test day experiences, including if there will be scratch paper, screen readers, and more timing accommodations. To add to the excitement (or confusion), LSAC has also confirmed that the unscored writing sample will now be a take-home portion of the test.

We’ve already broken down many of these questions, but there’s clearly much more to unpack.

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Predictions for the November 2018 LSAT

The November LSAT fast approaches, and the time has come for us to brush off our crystal ball and peer into its murky depths in order to bring you some predictions about what you’ll see on the November 2018 LSAT.

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How to Review a Practice Exam

We’re getting into the last month before another LSAT, and that means practice tests are absolutely essential to folks preparing for the exam. Any student who’s taken a practice test is familiar with the unnerving process of calculating your own practice exam score. However, the LSAT practice exams are not like online quizzes where you inevitably find out that you would be a Hufflepuff in Harry Potter, and then move on with your day. Scoring is really just the first step in reviewing a practice exam if you want to reap the greatest benefit from your practice.

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Taking the LSAT in 2019? You May as Well Take the July Exam

As we noted last week, LSAC has finally revealed details about the testing schedule for next year, including the logistics for how the transition to an electronic test will work. If you’re considering taking the test next year, this is a good time to hammer out exactly what timeline you intend for your test.

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One Last Piece of Advice …

I’ve been writing blog posts about the LSAT regularly for more than six years, and this is my last one, at least for now, as I move on to new things. It’s been fun, but I won’t bore you with stories about the olden times when logic games were on one page each and you had to bring an extra-sharp pencil to write super small in the margins.

Instead, here’s one takeaway, and it’s one you can use as a student. Sorry, I can’t stop myself.

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From the Vault: Understanding Your LSAT Score: The “Curve,” Explained

In a surprise move, LSAT scores were released late last night (so much for day-old promises, LSAC), which means a bunch of LSAT students have a shiny new LSAT score. You’ll hopefully hear lots of score recipients gushing about their scores, and you’ll probably hear some folks who are bummed out as well (we’ll have a post for those guys in the next couple days).

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A Complete Guide to When Stronger or Weaker Answers Are “Better”

For some kinds of Logical Reasoning questions, stronger answers are better. For others, weaker answers are better. Are you having trouble keeping track of which ones are which? If you’re trying to memorize it one question type at a time, all of this will get much easier if you understand one simple rule. Here’s the fundamental principle.

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Thinking About Retaking the LSAT?

September LSAT scores are due back at the end of the end of the month, and if you were among the many who capped off your summer by taking that test], you may now be facing the quintessential existential conundrum of whether to retake the test in November. If so, here are some things to ponder while you twiddle your thumbs awaiting your score:

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Getting to Yes on the LSAT

Before you start law school, the one book everyone will tell you to read is Getting to Maybe. As its subtitle How to Excel on Law School Exams might suggest, it’s a tract on how to excel on law school exams. Its essential thesis is that up to law school, most exams lavishly award students who can identify the “right” answer. But a law school exam — in which complex fact patterns are devised with no clear “right” answer, requiring students to apply legal analysis to both sides of an issue — is a different beast that requires a different approach. The book describes how to live and thrive in this land of “maybe” in which law school exams exist.