Category Archive: General LSAT Advice

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Using Practice Exams to Experiment with Your Approach

I broke my hand recently. Well, technically, I broke my hand two-and-a-half weeks ago, then spent the next fortnight icing my swollen hand and swelling my dumb head with false hope that my hand wasn’t broken.

When I finally got it checked out by a doctor, I found out there are two ways to deal with a potentially broken hand. The first way is to get it checked out immediately, allowing a medical professional to set it and ensure that it heals properly. But then you have to spend about a month in a cast.

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Minimizing Your LSAT Anxiety, Explained Through Four Scenarios

Anxiety affects virtually every LSAT student in one way or another. After all, it’s a test that could impact your entire career. The good news is that you can prepare yourself to handle some of the most stressful situations students deal with on the LSAT and learn how to minimize that anxiety on exam day. Let’s look at some of the most high pressure LSAT scenarios students face, so you’ll be ready for them on your exam.

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How to warm up before an LSAT

You’ve probably thought a lot about what to do during an LSAT, but have you thought about what to do before the test? It’s easy to let those little details fall by the wayside in favor of more pressing matters, but your test morning routine can absolutely help set you up for success. Here, we’ll take you through a quick outline of what your morning should probably look like.

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So How Much Should I Really Be Studying for the LSAT?

Summertime and the prepppin’ is easy. Well, sort of. On the one hand you have tons of time now that you’re not in school (unless you’re a working man or woman), but on the other hand it’s very easy to overdo it. Here are my tips for getting the most out of your LSAT prep this summer.

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Thinking about postponing the June LSAT? Think again (…in a couple weeks)

The June LSAT is coming up in 17 days. You may well be freaking out right now about whether you’ll be ready by then. That’s normal. It also does you no good.

The official deadline to change your test date has come and gone. You still have a chance to get out if you need to, though. You can withdraw your LSAT registration up until the night before the test, if you’re compelled to. If you do, law schools won’t even know you were registered for the test.

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The Importance of Pre-Op Steps in the Operation Family

Many Blueprint students are starting on the Operation family of the Logical Reasoning section of the LSAT around this time. The Operation family is made up of Strengthen, Weaken, Sufficient, and Necessary questions, as well as a few others. What unites these questions is that you have change the argument in some way. This post is going to cover the strategy you should employ to succeed on this family of question.

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What to Look for When Reviewing Reading Comp Passages

In my experience, LSAT students often neglect the Reading Comp section of the LSAT. I can’t fathom why—the passages are fascinating. Enthralling. You’ll get chills. But joking aside, the Reading Comp section has the most questions of any section on the LSAT, and therefore the biggest impact on your score. You can improve your Reading Comp score. It just takes practice. Since you probably took a practice test this past weekend, let’s talk about how to review and learn from a Reading Comp passage you’ve done.

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How to Pick Yourself Up from a Practice Exam

Most students in the Blueprint course have just taken Practice Exam 2. I’ve also seen a noticeable uptick in the number of emails from students panicked over the results of their practice exam results. I’m tempted to say that there’s a cause and effect relationship going on here, but as we continue to study to common fallacies on the LSAT, we need to be vigilant in recognizing when we improperly infer causation from mere correlation.