Category Archive: Law School Life

BPPjacqueline-lsat-blog-cold-calling
/ / /

Dispatches from Law School: The Stress of Cold Calling

When you think of law school, the scene that comes to mind might well be the beginning of the movie The Paper Chase, where a law professor calls on a student the first day of class and ruthlessly interrogates him about a case he didn’t know he was supposed to read. Law school professors are notorious for “cold calling” students — essentially, calling on individuals at random to answer questions without waiting for students to raise their hands. It’s a source of stress, especially when a lot of new law students are used to seminar-style classes in undergrad where they could pick up participation points by giving their opinion about a novel they looked up on Sparknotes that day. Cold calling takes away so much of your control over how and when you participate, so you have to be on your guard all the time. Now a few weeks into law school, I have been cold-called, and I’ve also observed it in my classes almost every day. With that experience in mind, I can answer some of the most common questions people have about professors cold calling in law school.

BPPalex-lsat-blog-3-common-law-school-myths-debunked
/ /

Dispatches from Law School: First Two Weeks as a 1L

My law school orientation began August 22, so I’ve officially experienced two weeks of law school orientation and classes as a 1L. My year before law school was filled with current law students and lawyers providing ominous and contradictory clues about the first year law school experience: “It was the worst year, but it’s supposed to be that way” or “I hated 1L — it was the best year of my life.” While it’s still very fresh in my mind, I’m here to provide at least a few more concrete details about my experience of the very beginning of law school.

BPProbert-lsat-blog-deadlines-june
/ /

Avoiding the Lonely Lawyer Trap Begins in Law School

A recent study from the Harvard Business Review found that lawyers were in the loneliest profession. And while this info might make you think twice about choosing a career in the law, those of us who are determined to stick with a legal career should still be asking, where does this issue of lonely lawyers come from?

BPPphilip-lsat-blog-law-school
/ /

Getting the Most Out of Your Law School Visit

By now, this year’s law school applicants have been through the most trying elements of the application process and are finally (hopefully) coming out the other side with acceptances from some of their schools of choice. Law schools are welcoming their prospective students to visit for specific events or to simply take a tour to see what they’re all about. And while it should be fairly obvious why you would want to go and visit a school in person before you decide to start sending them your $180k worth of tuition checks, let’s take a look at some of the ways you can be sure you get the most out of a law school visits as an admitted student.

BPPphilip-lsat-blog-law-school-myths-social-life
/

Law School Myth Busters: You’re Going to Give Up Your Social Life

To conclude our series on law school myths, we’re going to end on a positive note. Over the last couple weeks, I’ve gone over the “myth” that the first year of law school is incredibly rigorous and the “myth” that law school hiring is most dependent on your first semester’s grade. Unfortunately, both of those turned out to be more fact than fiction.

BPPdan-lsat-blog-lsat-reading-comp-book-club-iv
/

Law School Myth Busters: 1L Is Going to Be Really Hard

Continuing our series from last week, we’re going to go over another commonly held belief regarding law school to determine whether or not it is a myth. Previously, we covered the notion that law school students are cutthroat competitors — the type who would trip you if you were trying to escape from a horde of zombies — and determined it was more myth than fact. This week, we’re going to cover another off-putting refrain regarding law school: the idea that your first year in school is the most difficult academic year of your life.

BPPphilip-lsat-blog-law-school-myths-sabotage
/ /

Law School Myth Busters: Your Classmates Will Sabotage You

With the February LSAT in the rear view, we’ve entered a relatively LSAT-bereft period that will last until June. In this span, we’re going to do a series covering law school myths. To kick things off, we’ll talk about one of the most prevalent notions regarding law school — that it is a competitive environment filled with cutthroat law students.

BPPpeter-lsat-blog-look-back-weird-week-court-cases
/

Should you clerk after law school? (…Also, what is clerking?)

One of the aspects of a career in law that I find both appealing and frustrating is that the finish line is constantly moving. For example, when you first start thinking about becoming a lawyer, your goal is to get a good LSAT score and get into a good school. Then, the goal becomes to perform well in school, which can include a host of non-academic activities, such as journals and moot court.

BPPross-lsat-blog-maine-law_opt
/

The World’s Ugliest Law Schools

Last week, the aesthetes of Architecture Digest published a list of the eight ugliest university buildings in America. And — unfortunately for those who are currently plugging away at the LSAT in the hopes of one day attending these institutions — law schools were disproportionately represented. Despite the fact that most law schools are just one or two buildings tucked away in the corners of otherwise sprawling collegiate campuses, three of the eight slots were reserved for law schools.

BPPgreg-lsat-blog-february-course
/

Rafting Down The Law School River. Literally.

The University of Colorado Law School is putting on a “Law of the Colorado River” seminar. This is hilariously outrageous.

First thing you need to know is that a seminar is exactly like a class but no one does the reading and everyone has to speak, every class. So essentially, once a week you exchange completely uninformed opinions with about a dozen overly (passive) aggressive people who grew up priding themselves on the fact that they love to argue.