Tag Archive: Conditional Statements

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If You’re Studying for the LSAT, Memorize this List

In an episode of Bob’s Burgers, Tina spends all night practicing a song and dance for her book report on Call of the Wild (which she didn’t read).”You’ll be fine,” says Tina’s mom. “Just remember all the steps … memorize all the lyrics … and don’t mess it up.” For the most part, memorizing for the LSAT has a lot in common with practicing for a report on a book you didn’t read. You’ll be a lot better off working through actual LSAT questions (or just doing the reading for your book report) than you will be trying to take shortcuts.

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From the Vaults: Diajammable Statements

You’ve been studying for the LSAT for some time. Plugging away, figuring out when to make scenarios on Logic Games, how to tag a Reading Comprehension passage, and memorizing those common fallacies that recur on Logical Reasoning. You’ve been diligent, methodical, indefatigable.

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Diajammable Statements: The Playlist that Will Help You Study for the LSAT

You’ve been studying for the LSAT for some time. Plugging away, figuring out when to make scenarios on Logic Games, how to tag a Reading Comprehension passage, and memorizing those common fallacies that recur on Logical Reasoning. You’ve been diligent, methodical, indefatigable.

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The Deal with Principles in Logical Reasoning

Principles come up in a few different contexts in Logical Reasoning on the LSAT. Often, the word “principle” makes LSAT students think that there’s something weird or different or special about a question. Questions involving principles are a tiny bit different, but it’s really not a big deal. So let’s work out how to do these questions.

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Your 2018 LSAT New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year from Most Strongly Supported and Blueprint LSAT. New Year’s Resolutions are mostly a parade of self-delusional promises we make to ourselves before summarily breaking them, but this year, that’s going to be different. We promise — at least with respect to your LSAT studies, if you plan on spending part of your 2018 studying for one of the LSATs being held this year. Here are the resolutions you need to make to yourself now to make the most out of that aspect of your new year.

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Mastering the First Stage of Your LSAT Studies

Now that Blueprint classes for the February LSAT are underway, you’re going to be learning a lot and it’s going to come at you quickly. So this is a good time to go over what’s most important from the first few lessons. What should you really make sure you get down, and what don’t you need to worry about too much.

Here are the things that are really important right now:

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

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If you diagram, you should look for deductions

We’ve spilled a lot of ink on this blog about how to diagram conditional statements, but you may be wondering why you should even bother acquiring this skill — what good is being able to diagram, anyway??

The answer, of course, is that it helps you understand what conclusions can validly be drawn from a set of information. Today we’ll discuss the types of valid inferences that can be made from conditional statements — and stay tuned next week, when we’ll circle back to talk about what LSAT question types most often require diagramming.