Tag Archive: flaws

BPPcolin-lsat-blog-tips-improve-lsat-study-habits-lsat-score
/ / / / / / / / /

June LSAT Takers: Spend a Little Extra Time on This Stuff

The well-prepared test taker, just like the well-coached basketball team, should be best prepared for the most likely outcome. A well-coached basketball team, like, say the Warriors of the Golden State, should have been exceedingly well-prepared for the most likely outcome playing the Rockets of Houston last night.

BPPyuko-lsat-blog-election-flaws
/ / / /

The Typical Argument Types Typically Go Wrong on the LSAT

Describe questions (questions that ask of an argument’s “method of reasoning” or how the argument “proceeds”) have kind of a funny place on the LSAT. On the one hand, they’re not terribly common. You might see a couple on test day, or you might just as easily not see any at all. But the skill they test, describing reasoning with the subject matter abstracted out, is important to a lot of things on the LSAT.

BPPaaron-lsat-blog-cause-effect
/ / /

Understanding causal relationships results in a better LSAT score.

Causal relationships are big on the LSAT. Failure to understand them causes problems. Causation comes up all over the place — in reading comp and in a bunch of logical reasoning questions. But causation is especially important in logical reasoning questions that ask you to strengthen or weaken arguments. A high proportion of these questions involve causation somehow.

BPPbranden-lsat-blog-super-duper-tuesday-2
/ / /

The 2016 Campaign, A Cornucopia of LSAT Flaws

As this rabid, flea-bitten cur of a presidential election comes mercifully to an end, we should try to find something — anything! — positive to come out of it. So, here is my feeble attempt to bind up the nation’s wounds: We got to see a record-breaking amount of logical fallacies, and now there are concrete examples to think of when you’re trying to get all the flaws down for the LSAT.

BPPphilip-lsat-blog-supercharge
/ / / / / / / /

5 Quick Tips to Supercharge Your Logical Reasoning Performance

During my time writing for this blog, I’ve repeatedly vented about my hatred for logic games. Fortunately for everyone, I won’t be talking about logic games this week; instead, I get to talk about a section that is near and dear to my heart — logical reasoning — and the dead horse that is my vendetta against logic games will get at least a weeklong reprieve. Without further adieu, here are my five quick tips for upping your logical reasoning score.

BPPalex-lsat-blog-favorite-flaws
/ / / / / / /

Flawesome!

Flaw Questions are the most common single question type on the LSAT. They also happen to be my favorite question type. I love pointing out people’s flaws, but people don’t always appreciate it. Like this one time, a guy at my house was about to say “glad,” but then changed it to “nice,” and it came out “glice.” I tried to point out the error, but somehow I was the bad guy?

BPPyuko-lsat-blog-election-flaws
/ /

Logical Fallacies to Look Out For This Election Season

We’re already being forced to deal with election season nonsense. Instead of catching up on the latest Donald Trump fluff in the news, we’re going to look at some common logical fallacies used and abused by politicians.

Causal Flaws

Causal flaws abound in political reasoning. For example, a state will pass some expensive piece of tough-on-crime legislation, and then point to the fact that crime rates went down in the following years as justification.

However, just because Thing One happened before Thing Two, it doesn’t mean that Thing One caused Thing Two. Thing Two might have happened anyway. Crime rates may be plummeting in many similar states that have no analogous tough-on-crime legislation. That’s an instance of the effect without the purported cause.

BPProbert-lsat-blog-logic-flaw-correlation-causation
/ / / / /

LSAT Logic Flaws: Correlation vs. Causation

Ever had this experience? Your gooberish buddy stumbles up to you, a couple drinks too deep, and spouts out an epiphany that (to him) rivals Einstein’s Annus Mirabilis. You and your LSAT-prepped mind, however, are not impressed. Something about the logic doesn’t sit right. It gives you an uneasy feeling deep in your gut — a sensation exacerbated by the PBR and stale pretzels sloshing around down there.

Let’s take an example. Say your friend — let’s call him Elliot — adamantly insists that when he stood up, Sexy Sadie looked over. He’s convinced that his standing caused her eyes to linger longingly on his portly physique and freshly-starched robin’s egg Polo.

You tell him, in accordance with your studies, that there are three methods by which we may seek to weaken a causal claim.

BPPcolin-lsat-blog-fallacy-watch-romney-taxes
/ / / / /

LSAT Fallacy Watch: Mitt Romney and His Taxes

As we’ve discussed before, fallacies aren’t just related to the LSAT. They’re all around us. Every day you can see bad reasoning, whether it be in advertising, in politics, or on the news. Many of these arguments look like they could be right at home in an LSAT Logical Reasoning section. So today we’ll be looking at some of the attacks on Mitt Romney relating to his tax returns, and examining them to determine whether or not they hold any water. Arguments such as…

Romney won’t disclose all of his tax information. He must therefore have something to hide.

INVALID. This is something of an absence-of-evidence fallacy. We know that Romney won’t release his full tax information. Could it be because he has some nefarious tax secrets that he’s hiding? Definitely. He may have used numerous loopholes that would make him look bad, and he doesn’t want the American voters to know about this.